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Bolivia’s president talks of nationalizing all natural resources

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posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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Article from The Raw Story
By Agence France-Presse
Sunday, June 3, 2012

Bolivia’s president talks of nationalizing all natural resources
 

Somebody is jealous in Bolivia.

Their Ultra left Wing President Evo Morales is talking about "nationalizing" natural resources so "the People" have control.

He has apparently done this already with some utility companies.

He says that many things should not be private businesses.

Bolivia is believed to have more than 50 percent of the world’s lithium reserves.

Lithium is a key part of high tech batteries.



TIQUIPAYA, Bolivia — Bolivia’s leftist President Evo Morales, who has nationalized some utility companies, raised the possibility Sunday of making all natural resource-related industries property of the state.

“Another policy ought to be how we recover, or nationalize, all natural resources, so they are in the people’s hands under state administration,” Morales told a social summit.

The socialist leader of South America’s poorest nation said that “utilities (such as electricity, water and telecommunications) never should be private businesses.”



I wonder who is "backing" Evo Morales ?

And who buys lithium from Bolivia ?
 



related story from March 2010:

In southern Bolivia, there is a mountain called Cerro Rico—“the hill of wealth.” It is a pale, bald rock, crisscrossed with dirt roads that climb the slope like shoelaces. More than four thousand mining tunnels have so thoroughly riddled its interior that the mountain is in danger of collapse. Its base is ringed with slums that spill into the old city of Potosí, a World Heritage site. Evo Morales, the President of Bolivia, recently told me that he and his countrymen see Potosí as “a symbol of plunder, of exploitation, of humiliation.” The city represents a might-have-been Bolivia: a country that had capitalized on its astounding mineral wealth to become a major industrial power. Such a Bolivia could easily have been imagined in 1611, when Potosí was one of the biggest cities in the world, with a hundred and eighty thousand inhabitants—roughly the size of London at the time. Although Potosí began as a mining town, with the saloons and gaming houses that accompany men on the frontier, it soon had magnificent churches and theatres, and more than a dozen dance academies. From the middle of the sixteenth century until the middle of the seventeenth, half the silver produced in the New World came from Cerro Rico. Carlos Mesa, a historian who served as Bolivia’s President from 2003 to 2005, told me, “It was said throughout the Spanish empire, ‘This is worth a Potosí,’ when speaking of luck or riches.” Potosí is now one of the poorest places in what has long been one of the poorest countries in South America.

Can Bolivia become the Saudi Arabia of the electric-car era?




related story from July 2011:

“In the near future and with our production at such a high level, Bolivia, Argentina and Chile will control the lithium market,” said Rodolfo Tecchi, the director of the technology and science promotion division of the Argentine Ministry of Science and Technology. “They could do it with a sort of OPEC-like arrangement,” he added.

The three countries, which Forbes magazine calls the “Saudi Arabia of lithium,” would establish “control mechanisms for the sale of lithium carbonate, avoiding the lower prices that come with overproduction” he indicated.

Argentina is promoting the idea of an OPEC-like for lithium



Looks like South America is a hotbed for the green energy battery business




posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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Good on them!
I hope they do this so they can set an example for others.

Why should foreigners benefit so greatly from what belongs to every Bolivian when millions of them are starving to death?

There is absolutely no reason why they should be getting some large corporation to do the work and throw them crumbs from the giant cake when they can easily do it all themselves, and we all know its bound to be better for the environment. A group of trained monkey miners would be less damaging to the environment then these large corporations.

CONGRATULATIONS BOLIVIA! (If they actually do it)



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 07:11 PM
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And Argentina just nationalized most of their oil industry.

Nationalization is the way of the future.

Nationalization will save the western economies.

Imagine what billionaire mega rich jerks think of nationalization.

Nationalization is what the corporatists fear the most.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 07:19 PM
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I think those are good news. Bolivia has the right to find its own way to progress, without undesired foreign intervention. They lost their access to the Pacific Ocean during a war with Chile from 1879 to 1883, making very difficult any commercial exchange with other countries. I visited Bolivia years ago, it's a beautiful country and I wish them the best.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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reply to post by Germanicus
 


Regarding Argentina, I mentioned in one of my "not too popular" threads here (maybe you want to take a look) :



Yacimientos Petrolíferos Fiscales (YPF; English: "Fiscal Petroleum Fields") (BCBA: YPFD) is an Argentine oil company.


www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 07:53 PM
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How would monopolizing power in the hands of a government be any better than monopolizing power in the hands of a corporation?



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by Mkoll
How would monopolizing power in the hands of a government be any better than monopolizing power in the hands of a corporation?

Well lets face it, it couldn't be much worse.
I think the best way to do it would be to show people where the money is going.
Give them a list of projects and tell them how much they will cost so that they know the money is going back into the community.
At the end of the day its still going to be a lot better even if someone does profit a little bit.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 07:59 PM
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I think that's an awesome idea. The people should own all the worlds natural resources. Who really gives corporations the right to declare a natural resource their property. If the government was in charge of drilling and refining, the resource should be given to the people for free.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by HumanCondition

Originally posted by Mkoll
How would monopolizing power in the hands of a government be any better than monopolizing power in the hands of a corporation?

Well lets face it, it couldn't be much worse.
I think the best way to do it would be to show people where the money is going.
Give them a list of projects and tell them how much they will cost so that they know the money is going back into the community.
At the end of the day its still going to be a lot better even if someone does profit a little bit.


And after the government are given control of half the worlds supply of a very important strategic resource, as well as all the other resources in Bolivia, just what will they owe the people? So much power will suddenly be thrust into their hands that if I were in their leader's shoes I wouldn't feel beholden to anyone below me in my country.

And if they take control of the economy, where will they feel their control over the population stops? In practical terms they will control the people totally. If you control the distribution of resources to the people you control the people. It is that simple. Most humans I know wouldn't be able to resist the temptation and I think that Bolivia isn't statistically more likely than any other country to have a government staffed by saints.
edit on 3-6-2012 by Mkoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 08:17 PM
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I wouldn't be surprised if there is an assassination attempt on him now, or some sort of incited rebel uprising or something.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by CB328
 


If I were a Bolivian I know I would be trying.

Am I the only freaking person who thinks that this could be a bad thing?



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 08:38 PM
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Originally posted by Mkoll
reply to post by CB328
 


If I were a Bolivian I know I would be trying.

Am I the only freaking person who thinks that this could be a bad thing?


I tend to agree that a Marxist style agenda would be a problem.

The people at the top are at the top whether it's a corporation or a government.

The definition of corruption does not change.

One strange thing about Bolivia is that the Marxist regime has been in power since 2006.

Yet as the one article states, they still have huge poverty among "the people".
Even after some nationalizations have already happened.

I would think they would have equalized "the people" by now since the money is going to the government.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 08:45 PM
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sounds good at first, but with no market competition, efficiency can suffer, and costs can go up.

but in a dream scenario, with good people in charge, you'd like to think a nations natural resources would be the peoples resources



posted on Jun, 5 2012 @ 02:52 AM
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Originally posted by Mkoll
reply to post by CB328
 


Am I the only freaking person who thinks that this could be a bad thing?


Bad for who?

They have the right to control all their natural resources, instead to put them in careless foreign hands that destroy the ecosystem for money. Bolivians have maybe more respect for Mother Earth, as heritage from ancestors, remember "Pachamama".

The overexploitation of natural resources by their own people, when that happens, is because the lack of work, food and other basic needs of a human being. Multinationals have no justifications for the same acts.

South America can't go back in time and repeat the same karma, when spaniards took the gold in exchange for religion, rats and diseases.



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