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Dowsing Rods and Metal Detectors.

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posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 01:59 PM
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A few months ago I was walking by a tree, and I saw a branch on the ground. It was shaped like a Y and I found it to be intriguing.

Later on I was looking at it some more and I found it to look a bit like a dowsing rod. Now I have never tried using it for dowsing yet but it got me thinking. Maybe I should buy something a little more reliable to find old things buried underground: A metal detector.

I have always found metal detectors to be extremely exciting and and to me conveys a certain sense of adventure and spelunking. I was wondering if anyone owns a metal detector and would like to share their cool stories about it?

Also if you have had any success with dowsing rods, please do share.




posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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I was lucky enough to find as site along the detroit river years ago. I found uniform buttons from the
revolutionery war and war of 1812. also some coins and gold rings.
I used a $200. metal detector.
as far as dowsing rods I have been told they work for finding water or tiles
in a farm field. they sell them for gold finding but I'm under the impression they
are a scam. I think your stick would work as well



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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Perhaps dowsing rods are used in some scams, but my own personal experience says otherwise. People will say, "Well, even if you're not scamming, you are subtly moving the rods, perhaps unconsciously."

No.

A plumber taught me this. We were looking for a broken pipe underground. I used two copper rods, a bit thicker than solid electrical wire, bent in the shape of "L" You hold onto the small pieces very loosely, just enough so they don't fall out of your fists, and let the larger pieces be out level in front of you. You touch your knuckles together and walk. When the rods find something, they cross--completely of their own volition. When you find something you can back up, and the rods will un-cross themselves.

The most amazing thing about the experience was the amount of apparent energy. This was WAY MORE than just a subtle nudge, way more than gravity working on a slight tilt of your wrists. Those rods crossed with strength. Had I not personally experienced this I would never have believed it was possible.

I have no idea why this works. I just know I have personally experienced that it does.
edit on 6/3/2012 by schuyler because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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I was talking about the ones being sold as gold detectors being a scam.
Thats why I think a stick or a chrystal made on your own would work .



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:34 PM
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the ones you made are good too



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


I can attest to this , but I think only certain people are able to do it . I work in a large garage and my fellow mechanic was able to locate exactly the water lines running underneath the floor . Later on after knowing where they were , myself and a few others tried with metal rods and nothing happened . My friend did not know where the water lines were previously , and he has done this for farmers wanting to drill wells !



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by tired
I was talking about the ones being sold as gold detectors being a scam.
Thats why I think a stick or a chrystal made on your own would work .


scam

i have found over $300,000 in high grade gold in a old underground mine.
my friends in the big mine next door found over $3,000,000 with metal detectors.
www.origsix.com...
www.origsix.com...
www.origsix.com...

the three best gold hunting detectors

Gold Bug 3 good for shallow very small nuggets
whites gold master V-sat, good for larger (dime size up to a foot in hard rock)
Minelab GP extreme good for chicken egg size up at between 1 foot to 8 foot for softball+ size



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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I know I don't write properly but , I never said metal detectors are a scam, i think the
devining rods that are sold as "gold detecting " rods that peaople charge big money for are a scam.
they are just two metal rods ,some with a little box attached to one rod.
I myself have a gold nuget search head for my detectors. I'm not saying metal detectors don't find gold
I don't want to name names to discredit any of the ones I think are scams
And I do believe in dowsing rods and pendulums

edit on 3-6-2012 by tired because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-6-2012 by tired because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:11 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler
I have no idea why this works.

Its actually quite easy to explain.

1) Water will always take the easiest path through the ground whilst flowing downhill.

2) A fractured rock vein filled with positive valency minerals is easier for water to flow through than solid granite.

3) Mineral veins are often populated with copper and iron that both have a positive valency of ++.

4) This earth is one big ball of electrons where we are surrounded by static electricity.

5) As a diviner passes across a mineral vein the electrons passing through their body tries to neutralise the protons in the mineral vein. The steel rods will always cross perpendicular to the mineral vein.

6) Diviners used this method to search for mineral veins here in Cornwall at towns called Zennor and St Just back in the 18th century.

7) As we are all built with elements, certain people have more copper in them than others.

8) Sticks work in the same way as metal rods by using static. Remember lightning strikes a tree first before the ground because the tree is negatively charged when the lightning strikes.

Hopefully this makes it easier to understand.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:20 PM
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I wonder how much static electricity has to do with dowsing



If a stream of water can bend in such an "impossible" way because of a small amount of static, I don't see any reason why the "bend" can't happen at the stick-end of the equation.






..WATCH also the video "Divining Rods and Electricity INFO"for more information...some theory about the "Divining Rod Phenomenon" There a two types of DRods in use. One RRod is made of two pieces of metal like i shown in my video " Divining Rod and EMField " called L-Rods they got static electrically captures like a capacitor....The other common DRod is called V - Rod...it is a closed electrical loop...it follows the princip of movement and induction...like a coil..The body of the person who use the L-Rods or the V-Rod works like biological electrical amplifier ...the signal from the ground is amplified by the nerves of the body and causes a movement of the muscles of his hand...this is not in all cases the way how it works....in my last video about this phenomenon the (one..) L-Rod moved
only by the power of the EMField...confusing ? yes it is ...!!!
but quit interesting ...the signals where comes out of the ground can be detected cy electronic devices ....but is not simple to build it...it works like a passive radar...maybe you know this kind of detection...tectonic gaps got different electrical captures the the ground beside it....


pdf from nevada.usgs.gov...
nevada.usgs.gov...

Dowsers are also known to use pendulums for locating buried objects and ground water. The idea is that the diving rods or pendulum will be charged with static electricity from the user’s body, and when an object of high electrical conductance is crossed, the rods or pendulum will react by pulling downward, crisscrossing each other, or in the case of the pendulum, begin rotating in a circular path.

just a theory, but it makes some sense...



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:22 PM
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There is something to dowsing rods. During my youth, my siblings and I were gifted with a set as a novelty by a family friend. He then tossed several coins into a wide area of thick grass and turned us loose. Not only were we able to find the coins, but also bottle caps and small odd scraps of metal. It was interesting to witness the process first hand.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by Rapha

Originally posted by schuyler
I have no idea why this works.

Its actually quite easy to explain.

1) Water will always take the easiest path through the ground whilst flowing downhill.

2) A fractured rock vein filled with positive valency minerals is easier for water to flow through than solid granite.

3) Mineral veins are often populated with copper and iron that both have a positive valency of ++.

etc...


Umm, OK. I found a 4" plastic water pipe which was not even broken. It had an obstruction in it, a piece of bakelite, part of a ship's wheel some kid had flushed down the toilet. The pipe was "welded" (You know that kind of cement, right?) but had settled a bit. The bakelite piece became wedged against the lip of the pipe where it had settled, thus backing up about a dozen toilets, sinks, etc. in a large building. The pipe was about six feet beneath a concrete slab foundation.

Now we can make some jokes, of course, but the situation was not even close to water flowing more easily through mineralized deposits, etc. Nice explanation, but I don't see how it applies in this case. Of course, I didn't lay out all these circumstances in my initial post on the subject, so you couldn't have known. Not your fault.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by SolarE-Souljah
A few months ago I was walking by a tree, and I saw a branch on the ground. It was shaped like a Y and I found it to be intriguing.

Later on I was looking at it some more and I found it to look a bit like a dowsing rod. Now I have never tried using it for dowsing yet but it got me thinking. Maybe I should buy something a little more reliable to find old things buried underground: A metal detector.

I have always found metal detectors to be extremely exciting and and to me conveys a certain sense of adventure and spelunking. I was wondering if anyone owns a metal detector and would like to share their cool stories about it?

Also if you have had any success with dowsing rods, please do share.



Hi SolarE-Souljah,

If you've got a cheap metal detector you will never go completely hungry as you can always find small change or maybe something more valuable to buy food with.

However, the reason I write this, is that in a 20 years old metal detecting magazine there was a real story that I found rather spooky and thus fits ATS to a tee.


Two guys metal detecting. To make it more interesting, they agreed to split any finds equally between them. One guy finds a few items including a few centuries old ring which as per their agreement he gives to his buddy. The following day, the guy hands him back the ring and tells him he doesn't want it. He had terrifying nightmares of trying but failing to save people drowning in a river and knew that his nightmares were connected with the rings previous owner!


It makes you want to just to buy NEW in future doesn't it!



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by neotech1neothink
 


Ooh I like that story!

Definitely believe old items store much of the energy of their previous owners.

But still, finding something old and buried from a different era definitely excites me.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler
Perhaps dowsing rods are used in some scams, but my own personal experience says otherwise. People will say, "Well, even if you're not scamming, you are subtly moving the rods, perhaps unconsciously."

No.

A plumber taught me this. We were looking for a broken pipe underground. I used two copper rods, a bit thicker than solid electrical wire, bent in the shape of "L" You hold onto the small pieces very loosely, just enough so they don't fall out of your fists, and let the larger pieces be out level in front of you. You touch your knuckles together and walk. When the rods find something, they cross--completely of their own volition. When you find something you can back up, and the rods will un-cross themselves.

The most amazing thing about the experience was the amount of apparent energy. This was WAY MORE than just a subtle nudge, way more than gravity working on a slight tilt of your wrists. Those rods crossed with strength. Had I not personally experienced this I would never have believed it was possible.

I have no idea why this works. I just know I have personally experienced that it does.
edit on 6/3/2012 by schuyler because: (no reason given)


I have the answer to this one!
Everything that flows produces an electromagnetic field. The rods are reacting to the field by crossing. It works for water pipes, electrical wires and anything else that "flows".
I actually do the activity with my Physics students when we discuss electromagnetism and they get really excited about it.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler

Originally posted by Rapha

Originally posted by schuyler
I have no idea why this works.

Its actually quite easy to explain.

1) Water will always take the easiest path through the ground whilst flowing downhill.

2) A fractured rock vein filled with positive valency minerals is easier for water to flow through than solid granite.

3) Mineral veins are often populated with copper and iron that both have a positive valency of ++.

etc...


Umm, OK. I found a 4" plastic water pipe which was not even broken. It had an obstruction in it, a piece of bakelite, part of a ship's wheel some kid had flushed down the toilet. The pipe was "welded" (You know that kind of cement, right?) but had settled a bit. The bakelite piece became wedged against the lip of the pipe where it had settled, thus backing up about a dozen toilets, sinks, etc. in a large building. The pipe was about six feet beneath a concrete slab foundation.

Now we can make some jokes, of course, but the situation was not even close to water flowing more easily through mineralized deposits, etc. Nice explanation, but I don't see how it applies in this case. Of course, I didn't lay out all these circumstances in my initial post on the subject, so you couldn't have known. Not your fault.

There was still an electromagnetic field due to the pressure of the water in the pipe. It wasn't flowing past the obstruction, but there were eddies and currents even with the obstruction due to it being a liquid. You might think of it as a .... u-turn of sorts. The water flows in and out up to the obstruction and back out, then continues on its way through the rest of the "plumbing".



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by Rapha

Originally posted by schuyler
I have no idea why this works.

Its actually quite easy to explain.

1) Water will always take the easiest path through the ground whilst flowing downhill.

2) A fractured rock vein filled with positive valency minerals is easier for water to flow through than solid granite.

3) Mineral veins are often populated with copper and iron that both have a positive valency of ++.

4) This earth is one big ball of electrons where we are surrounded by static electricity.

5) As a diviner passes across a mineral vein the electrons passing through their body tries to neutralise the protons in the mineral vein. The steel rods will always cross perpendicular to the mineral vein.

6) Diviners used this method to search for mineral veins here in Cornwall at towns called Zennor and St Just back in the 18th century.

7) As we are all built with elements, certain people have more copper in them than others.

8) Sticks work in the same way as metal rods by using static. Remember lightning strikes a tree first before the ground because the tree is negatively charged when the lightning strikes.

Hopefully this makes it easier to understand.


not exactly, but close enough for government work

It doesn't matter about mineral deposits, it's the flow of the liquid (also happens with electrical lines underground) producing an electromagnetic field.
Mineral deposits can be used in other situations, but in the situation she is referring to, it's the electromagnetic field created by the flow of the liquid.
The reason lightning strikes the trees is because the trees are the highest point in most cases as the lightning takes the shortest path of least resistance. Lightning rods attached to your roof need to be higher up then the highest tree in your yard or the lightning is going to strike the tree, not the rod.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by 1825114
I wonder how much static electricity has to do with dowsing

It's the interaction between the static electricity on the baloon and the electromagnetic field of the flowing water. It needs a very close proximity to produce the desired effect. It may not be useful for dowsing, but does show that there is a field with the flowing water as well as static on the baloon.

But....not a bad theory at all with the information you had. Great job at inductive reasoning!
edit on 3-6-2012 by PurpleChiten because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by maria_stardust
There is something to dowsing rods. During my youth, my siblings and I were gifted with a set as a novelty by a family friend. He then tossed several coins into a wide area of thick grass and turned us loose. Not only were we able to find the coins, but also bottle caps and small odd scraps of metal. It was interesting to witness the process first hand.


Probably had to do with the iron levels of the rod you were using. If they were wood, there are iron deposits in the ground water and those get absorbed by the tree and spread throughout. The branches used need to be as close to a 90 degree angle as possible, but a smaller angles work as well but not as strong. Again, it's the electromagnetic field produced, this time, between the two prongs of the dousing rod (flow of electrons in the "metal" deposits) , that are attracted to the metal through magnetism



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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Originally posted by SolarE-Souljah
reply to post by neotech1neothink
 


Ooh I like that story!

Definitely believe old items store much of the energy of their previous owners.

But still, finding something old and buried from a different era definitely excites me.


Hey SolarE-Souljah,

Glad you like the story!


Don't get me wrong, I completely agree with you that finding something old and buried from a different era definitely excites me also! The story I read of the ring didn't put me off, but was spooky nonetheless!

Here's another intriguing tale from an old metal detecting magazine (in my own words). ..


A retired english police officer of quite high rank took up metal detecting as a hobby. In a layby next to a road he found a metal box of old bank notes from the 1960's worth £1million! Detecting beneath some nearby trees he found another identical box of cash worth £1million! They said that he kept one box and the government got the other box. He cleared off into the sunset somewhere!


IMHO - He must have combed through old police cases looking for un-recovered loot or got a tipoff - IMHO


Nice thread OP. Star and flag! Great to read a fun topic rather than doom and gloom. Take care.



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