It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Urban and Rural Survival Tactics and...what is your choice for a go-bag/bug-out bag items

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 12:06 PM
link   
Greetings, ATSers! Lately I've been studying some Urban Survival (Anonymous actually released a thorough guide [available at thepiratebay.or]) along with my normal Rural and Military tactics. Go-bags/Bug-out bags are planned according to an individuals interpretation of an emergency event. Out of curiosity, what are your ideas of an emergency you imagine and items you include in your idea of a bug-out bag? Thanks for sharing!

~Mick




posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 10:47 PM
link   
reply to post by mickd1337
 


Mick,
It depends on your location. It depends on how many people will be living out of this bag. How long to you intend to live out of it? Do you have a destination picked out? I have done this for sometime. Let me know your plans (not too much detail, Big Brother is watching), and I could probably give you a few suggestions...

5pooky



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 12:10 PM
link   
hello , may we just say 1 person for 1 bag for a day or separate bags for diferent items i.e bag of "seeds" or bags of "slugs"



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 11:12 AM
link   
To me, a BOB (bug out bag) is all about getting me to my home and my loved ones, should something happen while I'm at work.

I commute about 50 miles to work, so my needs are a bit different than most. So, I planned my bag to pretty much last me for 6 days (and that would be a really crappy hike...)

My wife's BOB, on the other hand. She's rarely more than 20 minutes from the house, so in her truck, her BOB is planned for two days (and has items specific to her needs). 2 Days is a more typical BOB. Supplies in my wife's bag, some are doubled, as we typically use her truck around town, on evenings and weekends, so both of us are in it...or our ranch hand gal may be with her, so I want both ladies to be able to get back to the ranch.

__________________________________________________________________

BASIC SUPPLIES: (in backpack or each truck), things in the truck, we simply grab if we have to abandon the vehicle. The backpacks are the type that have small wheels and a handle, so you can pull them if able to. (such as along the highway).

Food = Mainstay 3600 Calorie Food Bar (6 600 calorie servings, they taste like lemon cookies), a folding sterno stove, couple cans of food, tuna-fish cracker packs (mine has a little more food), can opener, multi-utensil (spoon, fork, knife)

Water = 5 Gallon Jug (in truck), Metal Water Canteen (in bag) - I know I'll hear some groaning on this, but without water, you die. Pure and simple. Drag it if you have to, but needs to come with.

Communication - Wavelength Emergency Radio, Charger (for cell phone) & Flashlight combo (cranking). Also, an emergency cell battery pack, and one of those mini walkie talkies (up to 3 mile range). (we have a set plan on how to use these, as approaching the house, etc.)

5-in-1 Survival Whistle (has matches, compass, mirror, flint)
Flashlight (with batteries)
Camo Snuggie (funny, but instant cammo and warm)
Multi-Tool (Gerber)
Map (marked with ideal locations, loot points)
TP (flattened), Moist Wipes
Comb, Soap, Washcloth, Deodorant, Toothbrush Kit (add makeup for her, add her meds and feminine supplies)
Mini First Aid Kit
Machete (to be strapped to leg)
K-Bar Survival Knife
Firearm and spare ammo (.22 cal revolver) (small ammo, so easy to carry a lot) - I'd like to upgrade these though
Tarp (in truck, along with bungees and twine)
Lighters
Garbage Bags (lots of uses for these, from ponchos, carrying things, waterproofing, shelter)
Duct Tape (lots of uses)

There may be other things I think of, or see, to throw in there, but these are the current items in the bags, as best I recall them. I know I'm forgetting some things. Note, looting would only be an option if a) the SHTF scenario was a long-term one, b) was out of food and/or water/gas.


edit on 18-6-2012 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 12:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by Gazrok
To me, a BOB (bug out bag) is all about getting me to my home and my loved ones, should something happen while I'm at work.

I commute about 50 miles to work, .....

My wife's BOB, on the other hand. She's rarely more than 20 minutes from the house...

__________________________________________________________________

Food = Mainstay 3600 Calorie Food Bar (6 600 calorie servings, they taste like lemon cookies), a folding sterno stove, couple cans of food, tuna-fish cracker packs (mine has a little more food), can opener, multi-utensil (spoon, fork, knife)

Water = 5 Gallon Jug (in truck), Metal Water Canteen (in bag) - I know I'll hear some groaning on this, but without water, you die. Pure and simple. Drag it if you have to, but needs to come with.

Communication - Wavelength Emergency Radio, Charger (for cell phone) & Flashlight combo (cranking). Also, an emergency cell battery pack, and one of those mini walkie talkies (up to 3 mile range). (we have a set plan on how to use these, as approaching the house, etc.)

5-in-1 Survival Whistle (has matches, compass, mirror, flint)
Flashlight (with batteries)
Camo Snuggie (funny, but instant cammo and warm)
Multi-Tool (Gerber)
Map (marked with ideal locations, loot points)
TP (flattened), Moist Wipes
Comb, Soap, Washcloth, Deodorant, Toothbrush Kit (add makeup for her, add her meds and feminine supplies)
Mini First Aid Kit
Machete (to be strapped to leg)
K-Bar Survival Knife
Firearm and spare ammo (.22 cal revolver) (small ammo, so easy to carry a lot) - I'd like to upgrade these though
Tarp (in truck, along with bungees and twine)
Lighters
Garbage Bags (lots of uses for these, from ponchos, carrying things, waterproofing, shelter)
Duct Tape (lots of uses)






Lots of excellent material.

The first time I packed my Alice pack, I could not walk more than 50 feet with it. Too darn heavy. I had to decide what was really important to get to my destination. Your route-plan and threat scenarios should help here. Where will you walk if your travel is interrupted at any point along your route? Are you going to walk along a highway in the open or are you gonna walk thru the woods? Will you be cutting across subdivisions or farm land? Are you facing a total traffic tie up, zombie horde, alien invasion or nuclear plant meltdown?

I like the Mainstay and other survival bars for shelf life and low weight. I favor hydration bladders and canteens for portable water with the understanding that I will mass hydrate from jugs in the truck before hoofing it. Cell phone and walkie talkie. Compass and map. Radio with ear bud. Military ponchos. Bear spray (large size).

Military surplus gear frequently offer the best bang for the buck. Do some hiking to check your physical condition and consumption of supplies.



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 12:54 PM
link   
reply to post by jcarpenter
 


That's why I have the canteen (military surplus store bought) and the 5 gallon bottle. The latter is what I'd like to be able to take with me, but depending on the scenario, and needed speed of exit, I may have to leave it (but still have the canteen).


Your route-plan and threat scenarios should help here. Where will you walk if your travel is interrupted at any point along your route?


Hence the map.
It's something you have to think about. Your normal route home may not work. (mine even involves a pretty long bridge...but there are alternate bridges)


Are you going to walk along a highway in the open or are you gonna walk thru the woods? Will you be cutting across subdivisions or farm land? Are you facing a total traffic tie up, zombie horde, alien invasion or nuclear plant meltdown?


Depends on the scenario, and surrounding environment at the time. Also depends on where I'm at enroute, when I have to abandon the truck (which I'd really be loathe to do, as it's the perfect SHTF vehicle).

The interstate pretty much is my only good route (either truck or hoofing it), as it's a pretty straight path. But, I could (if needed) still use it for navigation, while staying mostly hidden by skirting it a bit.

I have 3 good alternate routes indicated on my map (2 driving, one foot). I've driven all of these routes, so fully know what landmarks there are (and wrote these on the map), etc.

Mostly, the real threat for me is something like a Hurricane, etc., but it all works no matter what the scenario.

Bear Spray? I used to live in Kodiak, Alaska. Can't imagine this working, but then again, never tried it. Here in FL, not really an issue though. Did remind me of something else in our bags....small spray can of Deep Woods OFF! (insect repellent). Just the travel size one. I have a lot of little travel sized stuff in there.

My first attempt at a BOB was insane and huge. It was my old hiking backpack (full frame, etc.). It was just way too much room in the truck. Not to mention, I'd be damn tired real quick lugging that thing. So, I had to really think about the essentials. That's why I did it in categories...

FOOD
WATER
COMMUNICATIONS
WEAPONS
SHELTER
OTHER

I've also put some pretty good pdf manuals and maps on my phone. (I can use the crank charger to access them, if I have to). Easier than lugging a bunch of actual survival manuals.
edit on 18-6-2012 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 07:46 AM
link   
Wow, thanks to everyone that posted here. This was a great wealth of knowledge to me and my friends, and I hope to post my bag soon. Bug spray didn't even cross my mind, but that could prove extremely useful in a stuck in the woods type scenario. My friends and I have started "getting back to nature" and have planned a few camping and hiking trips, I was curious if you could shed some light on gear we should buy to wear, and also things we should learn for instance making fire etc. At the moment we are going through heavy conditioning to prepare our bodies if SHTF and although physically and mentally prepped, I don't feel like we have the experience or knowledge to truly last. Sorry for my rambling, thanks in advance!

Edit:
Allow me to add I'm no novice to the woods are high pressure situations. Been an avid airsofter for 5 years and counting and this has sharpened my survival instincts in regards to defending myself, but any and all information will be welcomed with open arms.
edit on 22-6-2012 by NTellect because: I'm not naive ?



new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join