It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Have Fruits and Vegetables Become Less Nutritious?

page: 2
12
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 10:09 PM
link   
_______________________

Info that everyone needs to know if they
don't already :

avoid fruit and veggies with stickers that have
5 numbers and start with the # 8



Those stickers on fruits and veggies tell you quite a bit !
-4 numbers mean that they were grown conventionally.
-5 numbers, starting with the # 8 means that they are
genetically modified (GMO).
-5 numbers, starting with the # 9 means that they were
organically grown.


_______________________________



edit on 3/6/12 by ToneDeaf because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 10:10 PM
link   
reply to post by ToneDeaf
 


Thank you for that information !!! I didn't know that. I'd wondered what those numbers meant. Now I'll be checking them very carefully. Thanks again.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 12:01 AM
link   
Trying to find a good honeydew melon in Alberta seems to be pretty hit and miss for me. Sometimes they are great and super sweet, at others bland and watery and most often thrown away



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 12:08 AM
link   
reply to post by RedbeardedFoo
 
Chicken poo seems to work great for our garden. We condition the soil with that (have 5 egg laying chickens).

Kill two birds (hope the chickens dont take offense) with one stone.



posted on Jun, 5 2012 @ 02:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by ezekielken
Trying to find a good honeydew melon in Alberta seems to be pretty hit and miss for me. Sometimes they are great and super sweet, at others bland and watery and most often thrown away


Probably because at this time of year in Alberta, they are being shipped in from California or Mexico and are picked before they are even ripe.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 09:31 PM
link   
reply to post by stanguilles7
 


I can tell by my own experiences that this is true....although it deals with mostly flowers and lawns.
When we moved to our home and for the first few years...the lawn and front yard got nothing by inorganic fertilizers like Scotts and MiracleGro.
When the soil dried out...it was like dust...and there were no earthworms.
It was dead.

The back was better, but mostly compacted top soil.

I did some research and switched to using compost and organic fertilizers and soil conditioner for my gardens and planted earthworms. In the front, I also used liquid humus.
The soil improved dramatically and I needed to water much less.
My tomato plants are huge....with good yields.

My husband used liquid humus on the lawns and finally agreed to use a good organic fertilizer ...it was amazing.
The ground is much better after a few seasons...the lawn is a better green, needs much less water....the dirt is reviving.

Inorganic fertilizers do feed the plants...but does nothing to replenish the nutrients in teh soil....eventually killing it.
Now I understand the Dust Bowl.



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 10:49 AM
link   
reply to post by stanguilles7
 


Nutrition data on fruits and vegetables does show declines in the last 100 years. Increased flavor seems to be a hallmark of increased nutrition, hence the renewed popularity of heirloom strains of fruits and vegetables, which have much better flavor and digestibility than the hybrid forms. One case in point is pinto beans, hybridized to get a greatly increased yield, but now has a much blander taste, and has increased levels of oligosaccharides, which are the indigestible sugars in beans. The oligosaccharises create a hard foam on the top of the water when the beans are cooked ... that's why the natural foods cookbooks advise skimming off the foam during the first part of cooking beans.

A non-bottled fertilizer option is seaweed. Here's the seaweed fertilizer that I buy. The company is on the coast of Maine, and their products are checked for ionizing radiation levels by a physicist at the University of Maine:

www.theseaweedman.com...



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 10:51 AM
link   
reply to post by ezekielken
 


Go for the ripe organic honeydew and you will not be disappointed. Ripeness is indicated when the rind feels slightly fuzzy to the touch.



new topics

top topics



 
12
<< 1   >>

log in

join