The Nutrition Idea that "Saved" My Life.

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posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 06:02 AM
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Yes. If you think that sacrifices and restrictions are not required on a long-term basis...alright, then.




posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 06:08 AM
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reply to post by Isayeva
 


My bad, I was replying to the post above yours.
Don't think of it as sacrifices or restrictions, think of it in terms of cutting toxins from your diet. You wouldn't feel you were missing out on pesticides by only eating organic food, would you? This is the same, and you'll come to love the fresh taste of your food and loathe the processed stuff you think you'll miss.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 06:21 AM
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Originally posted by SprocketUK
reply to post by Isayeva
 


My bad, I was replying to the post above yours.
Don't think of it as sacrifices or restrictions, think of it in terms of cutting toxins from your diet. You wouldn't feel you were missing out on pesticides by only eating organic food, would you? This is the same, and you'll come to love the fresh taste of your food and loathe the processed stuff you think you'll miss.


Definitely. But at first these changes feel like painful restrictions, especially if their bodies are accustomed to certain kinds of foods. I've read about people on the paleo diet whose bodies couldn't tolerate beer anymore.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 06:49 AM
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reply to post by torqpoc
 


Thanks?


Why the negativity? No real need for it. I'm not pitching anything, merely presenting my own findings. And yes, I have heard of the Atkins Diet. Been there, done that. It's not sustainable and it's insanely bad for you in the long term.


-TS



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 06:57 AM
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reply to post by Isayeva
 


Isayeva, in my case, I didn't feel any of the "sugar withdrawal" symptoms that many chronic carb addicts feel, as I was never a fan of really sweet things, nor did I eat a ton of bread. Then again, before I heard about and researched paleo/primal, I had already started the process of gradually lowering my carb intake in small amounts. I was using the Diabetics' Cookbook, as my step-father has Type II. The paleo/primal thing was the permanent last step in attaining a sustainable lifestyle for myself.

You're right though; some people that switch over without any sort of lead-in time can feel some discomfort until the body realizes that it doesn't need those types of foods to operate.

Beer does have a negative effect on me, and even after one, the entire next day my body is recovering from it. I drink it for the taste now (and normally only 1-2 every other week, if that), as I'm a huge fan of craft beers (I'll deal with the lethargy the next day). A poster a few pages back mentioned gluten free beer, and I think I'll try to hunt some of that down. It sounds like an interesting type of beer.


Thanks for posting.



-TS



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by truthseeker1984
 


Nettle beer is a gluten free, strong, tasty and stupidly cheap DIY option...



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by truthseeker1984
chronic carb addicts feel, as I was never a fan of really sweet things, nor did I eat a ton of bread.


Don't forget rice, pasta, potatoes, which are by far one the most common sources of carbs in day to day life.

T



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 10:23 AM
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reply to post by truthseeker1984
 


First of all, great thread.

I have tried something like this before and was amazed with the results. Not so much in weight loss as i'm not a heavy person but more in how i feel, energy levels etc.

I am however interested in the effect it can have on cholesterol, as on the one hand it made me feel better when I did it before but it pretty much goes against a lot of advice a doctor would give.

I have just had a test and have some pretty bad scores (a ratio of around 10 and around 450 ldl) so pretty severe. I was planning to create a blog and document what changes I can make and what impact this could have on myself and my cholesterol levels over the next three months (my next test date) and this way get a true guage of what works and what doesn't work for me. And I think the primal diet will be my first experiment.

If anyone is interested in following the blog and my progress, then please let me know and I'll link you up.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by torqpoc
 


I never liked those things very much either.
I guess I lump bread into the "all carbs" category, as pasta and stuff like that could count as a sort of bread considering the source of the food is the same. Potatoes are also off my personal list and have been replaced by Sweet Potatoes (right from the ground, not the canned Yams, as they contain a VERY high sugar content). Either way, the results will be the same for someone who was a "carboholic." There will be a slight withdrawal period in which some people may feel some discomfort. It subsides rather quickly, from what I've read.

~~~

And on another topic, I've found that in my own personal experience, that the cravings will come for certain foods when you least expect them to. Being that I was never a huge fan of fast food, my cravings usually consist of crunchy, salty foods such as: fish and chips, deep fried mushrooms, etc. Considering that these foods normally use a bread or beer based batter, they are huge no-no's. I've found that lightly sea-salted nuts such as walnuts, peanuts, almonds, and pistachios actually help with those cravings.

This morning I had an intense craving for anything deep fried. When I realized that my body was screaming "Give me some sort of fat!" (which is basically what the deep fried stuff is), I fried a small 4 oz. porkchop in a saute pan and topped it with some button mushrooms and zucchini. That killed the craving, and gave me a great brunch to fill me up for the rest of the busy day.



-TS



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 12:32 PM
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reply to post by TylerKing
 

Thank you Tyler. I have read about the Ms Recovery Diet by Dr Wahls and have been considering it. I am trying to get into doing a 20, 30 or even 60 day raw juice fast to reset my system, after I do that I am looking for a diet that will work long term. I already did a 100% raw 21 day diet November last year that worked wonders for my MS and me in general but it is not something I feel I can keep up for ever.

So now that I have a recommendation for the Wahls diet first hand I will seriously study it for when I am ready.
Thank you so much for sharing and I hope you stay symptom free. MS is a pain in well just painful and I actually feel it is completely uneccesary so I'm planning to get rid of it ;P

My Neuro always laughs when I tell him this time next year he will have lost a patient to a clean bill of health.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by IAmD1
 


Hey I don't know what your diet consists of in general, but I read before that soft drinks can be a cause of MS. Also you need to get rid of that inflammation, go to the store and buy some tumeric, it's supposed to be near the top on the list for diminishing inflammation, for MS, Arthritis pain etc.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 01:44 PM
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Originally posted by dkf89
reply to post by IAmD1
 


Hey I don't know what your diet consists of in general, but I read before that soft drinks can be a cause of MS. Also you need to get rid of that inflammation, go to the store and buy some tumeric, it's supposed to be near the top on the list for diminishing inflammation, for MS, Arthritis pain etc.


Thank you. I am one of the few people who actually do not like soft drinks too much. Never really have since my teens. I prefer fresh fruit juices and water. And yes I use turmeric alot in my cooking and raw food concoctions. I think my problem is sugar and carbohydrates mostly. I can seriously live without meat but try to keep me from baked goods is a much harder thing. :/

I was never really over weight so didn't consider just how bad my eating was. My eating habits were always very irratic. Some days I would forget to eat all together. But in general my health has always been good, hardly ever ill, perfect blood pressure good blood sugar levels. So for me I really believe sugar and vitamin D deficiency are the main culprits and maybe some viral infection along the line to kick it off.

I really think I can be rid of MS symptoms if I only get on track with a good stable diet. I already see the benefits of being mindful of what i eat. But the big hurdle is finding a diet that works in the day to day. Juicing is great but try finding time to make several litres of fresh juice every morning on your way to work. I don't. And grazing on nuts all day long at my desk doesn't always work out well either. So fitting a healthy 'special' diet into stressful day to day is my biggest issue right now.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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reply to post by IAmD1
 


Well you seem to be doing pretty good with your diet, things like juicing are what you need to keep doing, just try to stay away from the carbs and any highly proccessed food that has 100 chemicals in the ingredients list. Oregano and cinnamon seem to be other potent anti-inflammatory herbs, and I also use them daily, www.worldhealth.net...

Eggs are a high source of vitamin-D, or you can also buy a non-synthetic natural vitamin-D supplement online www.naturallydirect.net...



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by IAmD1
 


Broccoli can help with your Vitamin-D and inflammation, I'm eating some out of my garden right now hehe, believe me it doesn't taste all that great but I'm just one of those people that prefers being healthy,

"Broccoli may help us solve our vitamin D deficiency epidemic. When large supplemental doses of vitamin D are needed to offset deficiency, ample supplies of vitamin K and vitamin A help keep our vitamin D metabolism in balance. Broccoli has an unusually strong combination of both vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene) and vitamin K. For people faced with the need to rebuild vitamin D stores through vitamin D supplements, broccoli may be an ideal food to include in the diet." whfoods.org...



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by dkf89
 


One of the things I like to eat in place of something like salted nuts, is some natural trail mix, it does have a ton of fat cals, and keeps me full too.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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Originally posted by dkf89
reply to post by IAmD1
 


Broccoli can help with your Vitamin-D and inflammation, I'm eating some out of my garden right now hehe, believe me it doesn't taste all that great but I'm just one of those people that prefers being healthy,

"Broccoli may help us solve our vitamin D deficiency epidemic. When large supplemental doses of vitamin D are needed to offset deficiency, ample supplies of vitamin K and vitamin A help keep our vitamin D metabolism in balance. Broccoli has an unusually strong combination of both vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene) and vitamin K. For people faced with the need to rebuild vitamin D stores through vitamin D supplements, broccoli may be an ideal food to include in the diet." whfoods.org...


I love broccoli so that is not a problem for me - although getting good quality fresh broccoli is hard, it seems to always be a little dry out of the stores. Broccoli I've researched is best steamed so that is one of my favourite substitutions for hot food. Steamed broccoli and haricort verts with lime olive oil and some sea salt. Yummy!

Yes I agree with the juicing and smoothies, I just find it becomes a stress some days to find time to juice enough in the mornings, and carrying all that juice with a computer and a bag is a pain, especially because one of my MS symptoms is weak arms and legs. Carrying all that some days feel like running a marathon. But I'm stubborn so I will get it into the routine eventually.


Oh and thank you OP for starting an important discussion and well done on your progress



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by truthseeker1984
 


They have some great carrot, beetroot, swede crisps (chips to the US members) over here that I like to snack on when I crave salty snacks, I believe they are dehydrated rather than deep fried too. Maybe see if you can find some where you are.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by MrSelfDestruct
 


Do you know if you have familial hypercholesterolemia? That's an extremely high LDL count.

Also, I would suggest getting some real numbers. Was that a guess on LDL cholesterol or was it an exact measurement of LDL particles?



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 04:02 PM
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Originally posted by wavemaker


The OP said no grains. He didn't say no rice. I'm just pointing out that eating grains is not bad. Asians eat grains (rice) everyday and they don't become fat due to eating grains.


Go see what kind of grains they're eating (the species and how they were processed) and how much. Then you'll see where the difference is between US consumption vs. Asians (and I'm not sure what Asian you're referring to).



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 04:16 PM
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Can I just point out that peanuts are legumes, they aren't paleo and you shouldn't eat them if you're trying to be paleo.
It sometimes gets a little confusing, I know, what with all the conflicting advice about different foods, but peanuts are a definite no-no.





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