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Apollo 15, Jim Irwin's historical narrative in review

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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:25 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:38 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:50 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:55 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 04:59 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:02 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:07 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by Vitruvian
 


So you are saying that astronauts cannot lift 72pounds between them are you serious..



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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Mod-Note:

The personal attacks stop now. Get back on topic without the insults.



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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Right thanx mate.

I answered your posts vitruvian with accuracy to what you asked for
You knew what i meant they the buggies themselfs weigh i said just the buggies on there own
on the moon 1/6 of the weight .

The buggies with the full shabang i gave you including the astronauts etc the weight
i was right. i was very thorough with it.

I know my math well so am i wrong then with both calculations.

1 The actual buggy weighs 462 pounds which is on the moon 72
2 the total payload capacity when full 1080 is 180
3 I am right i gave these calculations before you posted claiming i missed something.
4 I could not have missed anything as the total payload is 1080pounds therefor is 180.

I never missed anything there total meaning all i calculated and answered correctly.
moving on...

What do you think i missed?



posted on Jun, 29 2012 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by Vitruvian
 



General conclusion : It is very probable that Apollo 15 images were taken on Earth in a studio stage.


How big would the studio need to be to explain this:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 01:26 AM
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Originally posted by denver22
reply to post by Vitruvian
 


So you are saying that astronauts cannot lift 72pounds between them are you serious..


It's not a matter of a simple 72 pound lift. It's a matter of Jim Irwin, single handedly holding onto a moon buggy for an unknown duration, trying to save it from "sliding downhill", wearing ill fitting gloves, his suit is too hot, he's perspiring a lot, losing water weight, can't take a drink because his water apparatus is broken, his heart beat is too high, he's having a case of bigeminy, Dr. Crank Berry said Irwin should be intensive care,



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 02:16 AM
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reply to post by SayonaraJupiter
 



It's not a matter of a simple 72 pound lift. It's a matter of Jim Irwin, single handedly holding onto a moon buggy for an unknown duration, trying to save it from "sliding downhill", wearing ill fitting gloves, his suit is too hot, he's perspiring a lot, losing water weight, can't take a drink because his water apparatus is broken, his heart beat is too high, he's having a case of bigeminy, Dr. Crank Berry said Irwin should be intensive care,


im not 100% sure, but i dont think they complained at all of being hot and sweaty, their suits might have been on intermediate cooling not sure so would have had been able to go higher if they were getting warm.. but i dont think this is where Irwin had his heart troubles.. the cooling in the suit was quite good often too good.

and its not like Irwin is holding the full 72lbs he is only stopping the very slight movement.


jra

posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 03:58 AM
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Originally posted by SayonaraJupiter
It's not a matter of a simple 72 pound lift. It's a matter of Jim Irwin, single handedly holding onto a moon buggy for an unknown duration, trying to save it from "sliding downhill",


The duration is known. Simply read through the transcripts and you can see how long they spent there. Also from the transcripts from ALSJ this was mentioned in the commentary by Dave Scott:


[Scott - "And, in my mind, that's one of the better pictures of the mission, because it tells so much. (A) there's some great geology on that boulder; (B) there's the tongs; (C) there's the Rover; (D) we're on a hill; and so on. It's got a good story behind it. But the Rover was so light when we got off it, it was sliding down the hill, probably not only because of the slope but also the looseness of the material."]


I don't think it took much effort to simply keep it in place.


wearing ill fitting gloves


Which was solved by cutting his fingernails.


www.femsinspace.com...
In the six days since launch the fingernails had grown, and they had been immersed in sweat for the last seven hours. The pressure was on the end of each nail. And our gloves fitted tightly against the end of the fingers so we could have some feel thorough the heavy material. I took my scissors and cut my nails just as far as I could. From then on, on the next EVA, there was no problem at all.



his heart beat is too high, he's having a case of bigeminy, Dr. Crank Berry said Irwin should be intensive care,


Dr. Berry said he should be in ICU if he were on Earth.


Heath problems on Apollo 15
Dr. Charles Berry stated to Chris Kraft, deputy director of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) at the time: "It's serious, if he were on Earth. I'd have him in ICU being treated for a heart attack." Endeavour's cabin atmosphere was 100% oxygen (when in space), so it was decided that he was in no serious danger by Dr. Charles Berry. Specifically "In truth,...he's in an ICU. He's getting one hundred percent oxygen, he's being continuously monitored, and best of all, he's in zero g. Whatever strain his heart is under, well, we can't do better than zero g."



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:34 AM
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Originally posted by SayonaraJupiter

Originally posted by denver22
reply to post by Vitruvian
 


So you are saying that astronauts cannot lift 72pounds between them are you serious..


It's not a matter of a simple 72 pound lift. It's a matter of Jim Irwin, single handedly holding onto a moon buggy for an unknown duration, trying to save it from "sliding downhill", wearing ill fitting gloves, his suit is too hot, he's perspiring a lot, losing water weight, can't take a drink because his water apparatus is broken, his heart beat is too high, he's having a case of bigeminy, Dr. Crank Berry said Irwin should be intensive care,

No it isn't, it is a matter that i never refered to the moon buggy rolling down the hill.
It is a matter of if and when they decided to lift it they could .





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