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"The End Game: 2012 And 2013 Will Usher In The End"

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posted on Jun, 1 2012 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by SedatedSon
 

Unfortunately no one will escape. Even the hoarders of food and weapons in the US mid-west. But panic not! The great collapse will one day arrive on all our doorsteps - but not yet! Europe has a contingency plan if Greece forecloses (which it might).
The problem anyway is not strictly debt. Debt is only money owed. The old saying that if you owe £50,000 you have a problem - however if you owe £50,00000, the lender has a problem is also true of Greece. Greece does not have the problem. The IMF and the down-line banks have the problem. The banks are not Greece!




posted on Jun, 1 2012 @ 02:14 PM
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Originally posted by biggmoneyme
so it's okay if i quit my job and just [SNIP] all day?
edit on 1-6-2012 by Gemwolf because: Removed T&C violation.


if SNIP becomes slang for you know what will you guys edit my post again?



posted on Jun, 1 2012 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


of course I do I am married to a machinist and master marksman, i know more about metal than your adv. woman. Also know most all of my fishing sinker are made of.... ta-da--lead! I am pretty bullet Proof.....here? anything You else question
me on????

it might sound arigant but most people are pretty dumb that's how we got in this financial situation in the first place, people aren't smart enough to not spend $$$ they haven't earned, that's why I welcome it, let them suffer a collapse in the world why I enjoy it....



posted on Jun, 1 2012 @ 07:47 PM
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Originally posted by biggmoneyme
so it's okay if i quit my job and just [SNIP] all day?
edit on 1-6-2012 by Gemwolf because: Removed T&C violation.


Dude, I would love to just sit home and snip all day.
Sometimes I snip 2 or 3 times in the morning before work.
I'll snip another time or two on my lunch break.
And then when I get home......IT'S ON!!!!!

I snip until I pass out.

But to be able to just sit home all day and snip?

Damn that would be fine.
All this talk about snipping has got me snippy.
I think I'll go snip right now.



posted on Jun, 1 2012 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by Mizzijr
 


I would really like to do the same! Maybe we should collaborate on those survival manuals LOL. I did go buy some fishing rods and gear recently. Hey, one can always fish when the grocery stores close. at least for a little while



posted on Jun, 2 2012 @ 10:11 PM
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I'd like to point out slide number 28:

As defaults in governments and banks come to fruition, we risk a closure of the stock markets entirely and a closure of the banking system as occured in Argentina in 2001, Russia in 1998, and Brazil in 1991...

So its happened 3 times in the last 21 years? Those countries are still here and all three are actually doing pretty good. Did I miss something?



posted on Jun, 2 2012 @ 10:28 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
I'd like to point out slide number 28:

As defaults in governments and banks come to fruition, we risk a closure of the stock markets entirely and a closure of the banking system as occured in Argentina in 2001, Russia in 1998, and Brazil in 1991...

So its happened 3 times in the last 21 years? Those countries are still here and all three are actually doing pretty good. Did I miss something?


Yes, they did not have massively over-leveraged financial institutions as the Eurozone and the rest of the world do today, and they were not locked into a single currency cooperation where their own economies were affected by and dangerous to any other economy in such a closely-linked way. The chance of contagion was much much lower, and ultimately the world bank et al had plenty of cash to bail them out (not all of them got one though).

There isn't enough cash in the entire world multiple times over to cover the failures of the banks of Europe, nor of the US or anywhere else right now. They're all stuffed to the gills with derivatives, and those bets are going to be collected from somewhere or the entire system crumbles. Most institutions don't just provide derivatives instruments either; they provide real services to real people, like AIG with its life insurance arm. If they had let it go under for its bad bets, everyone who had a life insurance policy with them would see all of their policies and contributions disappear. That goes right down to the heart of the little guy; it's never just contained to the highest echelons of finance.



posted on Jun, 2 2012 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 

I'm not saying that people would not be affected but some of the slides are labeled "the end of the world" which I think is overly dramatic and these three examples prove that it isn't the end of the world.



posted on Jun, 2 2012 @ 11:04 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by 00nunya00
 

I'm not saying that people would not be affected but some of the slides are labeled "the end of the world" which I think is overly dramatic and these three examples prove that it isn't the end of the world.


Depends on your definition of "end of the world". Literally no more civilization? Of course not. The most awful times anyone has ever seen in recent history? Absolutely.

Keep in mind, you're talking about three isolated examples that were not interlinked with the global banking sector on such a scale as today. But even still, what you saw in Argentina was unemployment at 25% and hundreds of thousands of people collecting cardboard scraps in the street to survive. In Brazil, they didn't so much default, but rather introduced a planned new currency as part of a recovery program (see if that ever happens in the US without huge chaos from the Fed). In Russia:


Russian inflation in 1998 reached 84 percent and welfare costs grew considerably. Many banks, including Inkombank, Oneximbank and Tokobank, were closed down as a result of the crisis.

[...]Many citizens were stocking up for bad times and throughout the country shop shelves were being emptied, leaving a shortage of even the most basic items, such as vegetable oil, sugar or washing powder.

[...]The confidence of crisis prevention ceased to exist as millions of people lost their life savings from the bank closures. On 7 October 1998, demonstrations were held in many cities[...] [S]elect military units were placed in a state of readiness.

[...]As the crisis deepened, regional governors had been introducing emergency measures: In Krasnoyarsk Krai in Siberia, governor Aleksandr Lebed, had signed a resolution to hold down prices "using administrative methods", a television report said. The authorities in the far eastern city of Vladivostok had banned deliveries of food to areas beyond the port city, and there had been talks of introducing rationing there.

Russia bounced back from the August 1998 financial crash with surprising speed. Much of the reason for the recovery is that world oil prices rapidly rose during 1999–2000 (just as falling energy prices on the world market helped to deepen Russia's financial troubles), so that Russia ran a large trade surplus in 1999 and 2000.

Also, since Russia's economy was operating to such a large extent on barter and other non-monetary instruments of exchange, the financial collapse had far less of an impact on many producers than it would had the economy been dependent on a banking system.


Ain't no oil in Europe or the US (with any significant ability to extract it within a decade), ain't no barter either, and 2008 showed the world exactly how dependent on the banking system the Western nations are. Now take all of those countries and give them a global recession/depression to try to recover in, and tell me how the story ends.



posted on Jun, 2 2012 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by Flavian
reply to post by DaughterOfARevolver
 


You know how to smelt metals then? And then cast it to make goods? Or even which rocks to smelt with?

Not trying to put you off, just showing it isn't that simple in the vision you paint.

And that is merely one aspect of it.......


It will take decades to use up all the scrape parts metal etc. By then we will have rebuilt to a degree. Smelting is not that difficult. There will be people with those skills too. But we have 3 d printers now too those will really be an asset...



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00
 

Depends on your definition of "end of the world". Literally no more civilization? Of course not. The most awful times anyone has ever seen in recent history? Absolutely.

Well, I guess tough times isn't my definition of "end of the world".


Keep in mind, you're talking about three isolated examples that were not interlinked with the global banking sector on such a scale as today.

Actually Raoul Pal brought them up as examples in his slide presentation.


Ain't no oil in Europe or the US (with any significant ability to extract it within a decade), ain't no barter either, and 2008 showed the world exactly how dependent on the banking system the Western nations are. Now take all of those countries and give them a global recession/depression to try to recover in, and tell me how the story ends.

The US produces 1/3 of its oil domestically and the EU about 16% but they also use far less and have supplies of other fuels.

As to how it ends, well it ends with people going through rough times and many deaths because of it, but with the majority surviving and moving on.


edit on 3-6-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:21 PM
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Well, I fear a collapse, anyone who thinks after this system is destroyed that a fair and balance system will replace it is dreaming. The old saying, "Things can't get much worse" isn't exactly true, no matter what happens, they'll be sure to set themselves up even better than they already were under the current system and us commoners will struggle even more.

It is going to get ugly and we are the ones who will lose the most. The game is rigged and we're on the wrong team.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by daskakik
 


Um.....okay, so you disagree with his choice of words. Many do not.

I disagree with your choice of words in saying it will be "tough times." Oh well. Not really important. The facts still stand.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:43 PM
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Interesting how 'resetting' the system is being postulated as a nice 'Let's just clear the tables' exercise. But don't lose the sight of the fact it would mean hard-working folks who have being doing an honest day's hard graft year in & year out suddenly lose their entire accumulated just recompense. What needs resetting is the inter-bank debt resulting from out-of-control risk-taking and hare-brained financial games, such as the derivatives market. Let all such transactions be outlawed and all open transactions be declared null and void. And let the architects of said schemes be turfed out and made to do an honest day's work.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00
reply to post by daskakik
 

Um.....okay, so you disagree with his choice of words. Many do not.

True, but it doesn't make them any more accurate.


I disagree with your choice of words in saying it will be "tough times." Oh well. Not really important. The facts still stand.

Also true and as history has shown time and again, even in the worst economic times humans pull through. Not all of them but the majority. Sorry for not buying into the gloom and doom.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by FissionSurplus
reply to post by biggmoneyme
 



I can't help but think that all the publicity and television shows about the "Mayan Prophecy" and Nostradamus quatrains were done in order to prepare our psyches to accept a disaster of any kind....



Agreed. The hype surrounding 2012 is to prepare us for massive paradigm shift. Likely to include:


- - - The start of World War 3 (The USA and remaining allies vs. Syria, Iran, Russia)

- - - A global economic collapse, 'due to increasing warfare' (taking the blame neatly off the corrupt system itself)

- - - Increased isolationism in the nations - even within nations, states/ counties may strive for independence.

- - - False flag 'alien invasion/ intervention' in order to restore the chaos to an illusion of peace.

- - - The coming of a 'global teacher', uniting the world under the banner of a one world government.



People will hail the global teacher as a saviour figure for restoring civilisation; however, this celebration will prove short-lived. The NWO he leads will be corrupt to the bone, and the initial two-tier technocratic society will develop into a demonic regime of totalitarianism.

Lots to think about, and of course, there are many different theories on the table. Mine is just one of them, and is built from personal experience, Bible prophecy, and by looking at world events as they stand today, and as they have played out over the past ten years or so.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:12 PM
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all of you that think the world will soon end, send me all your worthless cash. i guess i'm just (sheeple), (can't wake up), (part of the illuminati), (disinfo agent), (dumb and stupid)...so...please help out, and unburden yourselves of that worthless cash you have...thankyou



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by jimmyx
 


Nice try, but it's not worthless yet...

The actual financial collapse may not come for some time yet - and even in the face of apparent anarchy, a fractured society might still use paper money as a trade enabling currency.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
I'd like to point out slide number 28:

As defaults in governments and banks come to fruition, we risk a closure of the stock markets entirely and a closure of the banking system as occured in Argentina in 2001, Russia in 1998, and Brazil in 1991...

So its happened 3 times in the last 21 years? Those countries are still here and all three are actually doing pretty good. Did I miss something?


Yes apparently you did, first off life got much worse in all three, and still is much worse in both Russia and especially Argentina.

Second we are not talking about isolated countries this time, we are talking about a worldwide depression, no first world country is going to come out of this unscathed. Hard to say what that could lead to, world war III certainly isn't out of the question. Yes I think we will survive, but life is likely to suck quite a bit more than now, that is the point.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by proximo
 

Someone already tried to point that out.

I don't agree but thanks for trying.



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