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I make my own liposomal vit C. This stuff is frickin AMAZING!!!!!

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posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 11:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by Sabreblade
I have a question.
I have been all through the research done by Linus Pauling, Robert Cathcart, Albert Szent-Györgyi and Fred Klenner, and I haven't seen any reference to massive doses of C causing elevated acid levels in the body.
And they used some pretty massive doses.
So what is everyone worried about?
Is there something we know now that they all missed?
Did I miss something in their research?
It looks like if C elevated the acid in your body, it would eliminate it's cancer killing ability.
edit on 23-6-2012 by Sabreblade because: Is/was


There seems to be quite a bit of confusion, or perhaps fairer to say, misunderstanding about the acid/alkali thing.
Consuming acidic foods does not necessarily acidify the body, in fact, many acidic foods (fruits etc) actually alkalize the body. It's the end result that counts, not the stuff you drink or eat.

Acid/alkali has become yet another health food fad. It has some basis in reality, but has been bastardized for the purpose of profit and probably other egoic reasons.

The idea is to eat natural whole foods, as they occur in nature, and your system will naturally alkalize.
It's the processed crap (and the not so crap but still processed - like wholemeal bread and other stuff you buy in packets) that acidifies the body.

I've read many conflicting theories on this, but very little consensus that comes from quarters not invested in selling products.

Even testing for acidity is a bit of a challenge: saliva, pee, blood, when, where, etc

Does anyone have any definitive source for this kind of info so we can all educate ourselves a bit? Perhaps something done by some alternative but predominantly non-commercial organisation?




posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 11:33 AM
link   
reply to post by Destinyone
 




The LEC has made a big difference in my day to day life. I've been with this thread since the OP made his first post.

Thanks to everyone who've made this the best group experiment I've ever been involved in. I'm doing things I never thought I'd have the energy to do again at this time in my life. I feel blessed to have found this thread, and to meet the wonderful Folks who've become my LEC forum Family.

Des

Hey Des
It really warms my heart to see this thread help so many people improve their lives. Your reply put a smile on my face and really made my day. Feels good to help inform others and help out in some way. I wish we could all get along in the world the way we all united in this thread.

Awesomeness



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 02:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by kaylaluv

Originally posted by AuranVector


What's in the Buffered Vit C you ordered? I am using pure Kal C-Crystals for this purpose. But I have some Bronson C powder buffered with calcium-magnesium and potassium which I chose NOT to use for this purpose, simply because it's not part of any of the recipes.



It just lists sodium and vitamin C as the ingredients.

pureformulas.com...



Kaylaluv, you did good. This type of C is not only safe for this purpose (lipo C), but the perfect choice.
What you have is Sodium Ascorbate -- Vit C mixed with Bicarbonate of Soda.

Feel confident in proceeding with your experiment. Next time, I'm going to buy this kind of C.

AV



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 03:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by AuranVector

Originally posted by kaylaluv

Originally posted by AuranVector


What's in the Buffered Vit C you ordered? I am using pure Kal C-Crystals for this purpose. But I have some Bronson C powder buffered with calcium-magnesium and potassium which I chose NOT to use for this purpose, simply because it's not part of any of the recipes.



It just lists sodium and vitamin C as the ingredients.

pureformulas.com...



Kaylaluv, you did good. This type of C is not only safe for this purpose (lipo C), but the perfect choice.
What you have is Sodium Ascorbate -- Vit C mixed with Bicarbonate of Soda.

Feel confident in proceeding with your experiment. Next time, I'm going to buy this kind of C.

AV


Excellent! Because I bought 3 bottles of it.


Thanks for responding.



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 03:07 PM
link   

Originally posted by dominicus

It really warms my heart to see this thread help so many people improve their lives. Your reply put a smile on my face and really made my day. Feels good to help inform others and help out in some way. I wish we could all get along in the world the way we all united in this thread.

Awesomeness


one day bro'


it's also interesting to see the thread has NOT drawn the usual ATS 'debunking' peeps or the allopathy fans and apologists who love to bash anything natural that seems to work and doesn't have multiple peer reviewed papers supporting it



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 03:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by Sabreblade
I have a question.
I have been all through the research done by Linus Pauling, Robert Cathcart, Albert Szent-Györgyi and Fred Klenner, and I haven't seen any reference to massive doses of C causing elevated acid levels in the body.
And they used some pretty massive doses.
So what is everyone worried about?
Is there something we know now that they all missed?
Did I miss something in their research?
It looks like if C elevated the acid in your body, it would eliminate it's cancer killing ability.



That's an excellent question. I've experimented with massive amounts of raw C and had success in turning off oncoming colds/flu. The downside of massive amounts of raw C is diarrhea and sour stomach.

Lipo encapsulated C pretty much eliminates these problems. I have not had any diarrhea from Lipo C.
However, after a few days on Lipo C, I have developed a sour stomach. Taking Bicarbonate of Soda mixed with water on the side, has helped quell this problem somewhat, but not entirely.

Hence my next experiment with mixing the B of Soda (aluminum free) in with the lecithin & C before the encapsulation process.

I have a couple of books on the Acid/ Alkali issue, but don't have time to go into that now.

It's really confusing because highly acid foods (like citrus fruits) have an alkalizing effect on the body.

I'm sure there are sources online that can explain this better than I can. Later.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 07:00 AM
link   
reply to post by kaylaluv
 


Also you can make your own sodium ascorbate using baking soda and ascorbic acid.

From my research of the aluminum thing I have found that nearly all baking soda today is aluminum free. (not to be confused with baking powder - some aluminum free, some not). Arm and Hammer's baking soda doesn't say it is but people who have contacted them said the company told them it was aluminum free. Even the baking soda company (Bob's?) that advertises itself as aluminum free is going to remove that from the label because being aluminum free is now the industry standard.


edit on 25-6-2012 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 09:29 AM
link   
Hey all,

I have been on the brew for 3 weeks, here are my results:
Energy - great, better than an energy drink
Arthritis Pain is almost gone, I could hardly walk for more than a hundred feet without pain in my knees, that pain is gone!!!!. plus the joint pain in my hands and feet. I have gained more strength in my hands also. I think the inflammation is gone for which I was taking 750 mg of IBprophen every day. All my joints feel like that have more fluid around them, or a full effect, not sure what that is?
I take three ounces a day, and plan to continue. I have not been free of Arthritis pain for more than five years, this stuff works for that, I take no other pain relief medications.
Thanks for all of your posts, they have been great to read and learn from.
My mix:
3 Tbls Lecithin 1 cup cold distilled water (non soy)
Mix in Vitamix blender - 3 minutes
1 Tbls AA dissolved in 1 Cup cold distilled water
Add to blender, mix 3 minutes on high
Add to Ultrasonic for 30 minutes of cycles.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 09:51 AM
link   

Originally posted by MegaMind
reply to post by kaylaluv
 


Also you can make your own sodium ascorbate using baking soda and ascorbic acid.

From my research of the aluminum thing I have found that nearly all baking soda today is aluminum free. (not to be confused with baking powder - some aluminum free, some not). Arm and Hammer's baking soda doesn't say it is but people who have contacted them said the company told them it was aluminum free. Even the baking soda company (Bob's?) that advertises itself as aluminum free is going to remove that from the label because being aluminum free is now the industry standard.


edit on 25-6-2012 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)


That's good to know - thanks. I might try making my own when I run out of the sodium ascorbate I've already purchased. Especially if it ends up being cheaper.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by Gizmoto
Hey all,

I have been on the brew for 3 weeks, here are my results:
Energy - great, better than an energy drink
Arthritis Pain is almost gone, I could hardly walk for more than a hundred feet without pain in my knees, that pain is gone!!!!. plus the joint pain in my hands and feet. I have gained more strength in my hands also. I think the inflammation is gone for which I was taking 750 mg of IBprophen every day. All my joints feel like that have more fluid around them, or a full effect, not sure what that is?
I take three ounces a day, and plan to continue. I have not been free of Arthritis pain for more than five years, this stuff works for that, I take no other pain relief medications.
Thanks for all of your posts, they have been great to read and learn from.
My mix:
3 Tbls Lecithin 1 cup cold distilled water (non soy)
Mix in Vitamix blender - 3 minutes
1 Tbls AA dissolved in 1 Cup cold distilled water
Add to blender, mix 3 minutes on high
Add to Ultrasonic for 30 minutes of cycles.


Sounds like it's working great for you!! Good to hear all these positive results. I'm hoping to get more energy. I can't do caffeine at all - it makes my heart race - so I'm looking for more energy without stimulants. I'm hoping this lipo-C is the answer!



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:37 PM
link   
reply to post by AuranVector
 



More information on the acidity/alkalinity of foods:
=======================================

The issue of acid and alkaline foods is a confusing one, because there are several different ways of using these words with respect to food.

The pH of foods

In food chemistry textbooks that take a Western science approach to foods, every food has a value that is called its "pH value." pH is a special scale created to measure how acidic or alkaline a fluid or substance is. It ranges from 0 (most acidic) to 14 (most alkaline) with 7.0 being neutral. One way of thinking about it is that as you get closer to 7.0 from either end, the food becomes less acidic (6.0 vs 5.0, for example) or less alkaline (8.0 vs 9.0, for example).

Limes, for example, have a very low pH of 2.0 and are highly acidic according to the pH scale. Lemons are slightly less acidic at a pH of 2.2. Egg whites are not acidic at all, and have a pH of 8.0. Meats are also non-acidic, with a pH of about 7.0.

Many vegetables lie somewhere in the middle of the pH range. The pH of asparagus, for example, is 5.6; of sweet potatoes, 5.4; of cucumbers, 5.1; of carrots, 5.0; of green peas, 6.2; of corn, 6.3. Tomatoes fit on the pH scale toward the more acidic end in comparison to other vegetables. Their pH ranges from 4.0 to 4.6. However, this range is still higher (less acidic) than fruits like pears (with a pH of 3.9) or peaches (with a pH of 3.5) or strawberries (3.4) or plums (2.9).

Acid-forming foods

Another way to talk about food acidity is not to measure the acidity of the food itself, but the to measure changes in the acidity of body fluids once the food has been eaten. In other words, from this second perspective, a food is not labeled as "acidic," but instead as "acid-forming."

Although the idea of acid-forming foods goes back almost 100 years in the research, there's been very little research published in this area until fairly recently. In earlier publications, acid-forming foods were often talked about as key components of an "acid-ash diet." The term "ash" was used much more commonly in those days to refer to the inorganic components of a diet (mineral elements or molecules not containing carbon) that remained after the digestion and metabolism of food had occurred. This ash was also commonly referred to as a "residue" of the diet. Diets largely devoid of meat, fish, eggs, cheese, and grains were described as "alkaline-ash diets." These diets focused on consumption of fruits and vegetables and also included cow's milk. By contrast, diets containing large amounts of meat, fish, eggs, cheese and grains were described as "acid-ash diets."

Although the term "ash" is seldom used in current research studies on diet, the idea of acid-forming foods has remained a topic of research interest. A new term has been created in the research world to refer to the potential impact of certain foods on the kidneys and urine acid levels. This term is "potential renal acid load" or PRAL. For meats, a PRAL value of 9.5 has been reported by researchers. Alongside of meats in terms of high PRAL value are cheeses (8.0), fish (7.9), flour (7.0), and noodles (6.7). In contrast with these high PRAL values are the values for fruits (-3.1), vegetables (-2.8), fruits, and cow's milk (1.0).

Researchers have been concerned about one particular aspect of high-PRAL food intake, and that concern involves bone health. It's always important for our bloodstream to keep acidity under control. Our kidneys, lungs, and other organ systems work hard to keep our blood pH very close to 7.4. However, if presented with too many acids from the digestion and metabolism of food, our body will try to neutralize those acids using a process called buffering. To buffer an acid, our body needs to link the acid with another chemical called a "base." Sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium are minerals that readily form bases for our body to use as acid buffers. One readily available source for calcium is bone, and researchers have wondered whether a diet that is overly acid-forming will place too heavy demands on our bone for calcium buffers. There's some research that suggests this process may take place over the short run (60 days or less), but the long-term impact of excess acid-forming foods in the diet on bone calcium is not clear from studies to date.

============================================================

To be continued in the next post.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:37 PM
link   
reply to post by AuranVector
 



More information on the acidity/alkalinity of foods:
=======================================

The issue of acid and alkaline foods is a confusing one, because there are several different ways of using these words with respect to food.

The pH of foods

In food chemistry textbooks that take a Western science approach to foods, every food has a value that is called its "pH value." pH is a special scale created to measure how acidic or alkaline a fluid or substance is. It ranges from 0 (most acidic) to 14 (most alkaline) with 7.0 being neutral. One way of thinking about it is that as you get closer to 7.0 from either end, the food becomes less acidic (6.0 vs 5.0, for example) or less alkaline (8.0 vs 9.0, for example).

Limes, for example, have a very low pH of 2.0 and are highly acidic according to the pH scale. Lemons are slightly less acidic at a pH of 2.2. Egg whites are not acidic at all, and have a pH of 8.0. Meats are also non-acidic, with a pH of about 7.0.

Many vegetables lie somewhere in the middle of the pH range. The pH of asparagus, for example, is 5.6; of sweet potatoes, 5.4; of cucumbers, 5.1; of carrots, 5.0; of green peas, 6.2; of corn, 6.3. Tomatoes fit on the pH scale toward the more acidic end in comparison to other vegetables. Their pH ranges from 4.0 to 4.6. However, this range is still higher (less acidic) than fruits like pears (with a pH of 3.9) or peaches (with a pH of 3.5) or strawberries (3.4) or plums (2.9).

Acid-forming foods

Another way to talk about food acidity is not to measure the acidity of the food itself, but the to measure changes in the acidity of body fluids once the food has been eaten. In other words, from this second perspective, a food is not labeled as "acidic," but instead as "acid-forming."

Although the idea of acid-forming foods goes back almost 100 years in the research, there's been very little research published in this area until fairly recently. In earlier publications, acid-forming foods were often talked about as key components of an "acid-ash diet." The term "ash" was used much more commonly in those days to refer to the inorganic components of a diet (mineral elements or molecules not containing carbon) that remained after the digestion and metabolism of food had occurred. This ash was also commonly referred to as a "residue" of the diet. Diets largely devoid of meat, fish, eggs, cheese, and grains were described as "alkaline-ash diets." These diets focused on consumption of fruits and vegetables and also included cow's milk. By contrast, diets containing large amounts of meat, fish, eggs, cheese and grains were described as "acid-ash diets."

Although the term "ash" is seldom used in current research studies on diet, the idea of acid-forming foods has remained a topic of research interest. A new term has been created in the research world to refer to the potential impact of certain foods on the kidneys and urine acid levels. This term is "potential renal acid load" or PRAL. For meats, a PRAL value of 9.5 has been reported by researchers. Alongside of meats in terms of high PRAL value are cheeses (8.0), fish (7.9), flour (7.0), and noodles (6.7). In contrast with these high PRAL values are the values for fruits (-3.1), vegetables (-2.8), fruits, and cow's milk (1.0).

Researchers have been concerned about one particular aspect of high-PRAL food intake, and that concern involves bone health. It's always important for our bloodstream to keep acidity under control. Our kidneys, lungs, and other organ systems work hard to keep our blood pH very close to 7.4. However, if presented with too many acids from the digestion and metabolism of food, our body will try to neutralize those acids using a process called buffering. To buffer an acid, our body needs to link the acid with another chemical called a "base." Sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium are minerals that readily form bases for our body to use as acid buffers. One readily available source for calcium is bone, and researchers have wondered whether a diet that is overly acid-forming will place too heavy demands on our bone for calcium buffers. There's some research that suggests this process may take place over the short run (60 days or less), but the long-term impact of excess acid-forming foods in the diet on bone calcium is not clear from studies to date.

============================================================

To be continued in the next post.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:39 PM
link   
reply to post by Kerberos007
 


More info on the acidity/alkalinity of foods" Continued:
=========================================================================

One of the factors that high-PRAL foods have in common (with the exception of grains) is their high protein content. Meat, fish, and cheese are all high-protein foods. Because protein is composed of amino acids, and because amino acids can be easily converted in the body to organic acids, it makes sense for high-protein foods to be treated as foods that can increase potential renal acid load. When present-day researchers try to model the potential acid-forming nature of a diet (meaning the potential for a diet to increase the acidity of our urine and acid load upon our kidneys), they always factor in the protein density of the diet. Potassium content, calcium content, and magnesium content are also typically factored in because these minerals readily form bases that can be used to help buffer acids. Sometimes researchers also look at the ratio of a potentially acid-forming component like protein to an available buffering mineral like potassium.

The table below summaries primary higher PRAL and lower PRAL food groups

Food Group PRAL Higher or Lower PRAL
Meats 9.5 Higher
Cheeses 8.0 Higher
Fish 7.9 Higher
Flour 7.0 Higher
Noodles 6.7 Higher
Fruits -3.1 Lower
Vegetables - 2.8 Lower
Cow's Milk 1.0 Lower
Source: Barzel US and Massey LK. (1998). Excess dietary protein can adversely affect bone. J Nutr 128: 1051-1053.

Acid-alkaline and the World's Healthiest Foods

Although the impact of foods on our kidneys and urine acidity is definitely an important topic from the standpoint of diet and health, it is still one very narrow component of our body's acid-base balance. All of our bodily fluids have their own characteristic degree of acidity, and our metabolism works in thousands of ways to protect acid-base levels in all of our tissue. So we would not want to draw any hard and fast conclusions about how to eat from studies on urine acidity and the PRAL value of foods. However, I do believe that research in this area supports our basic approach to healthy eating at the World's Healthiest Foods. We place our greatest emphasis on daily intake of vegetables and fruits, and in this urine acidity research, we discover that vegetables and fruits have lower PRAL values than any other food groups. We also encourage moderation throughout our website with respect to consumption of meats and believe this recommendation is in keeping with urine acidity research that places meats at the top of the PRAL list with a value of 9.5. While the PRAL research was not a factor in our initial construction of the World's Healthiest Foods list, we are reassured to see that our Healthiest Way of Eating is one that should result in little risk with respect to potential renal acid load.

Other approaches to acid-alkaline and diet

On other websites, especially websites interested in macrobiotic eating, Asian medicine, and energy medicine, you'll find detailed discussion of acid-forming and alkaline-forming foods that do not follow this Western science research involving urine acidity and PRAL values. Instead, these approaches typically look at whole body acid-base balance (rather than acidity of one body fluid like the urine) and they talk about "toxic acidic conditions" or the need for a slightly alkaline condition in the body as whole. To find out more about these alternative ways of approach acid-base balance in the body and dietary choices, you may want to visit one or more of the following websites:

www.gomf.macrobiotic.net... (The George Osawa Macrobiotic Foundation)

www.kushiinstitute.org...&%20Healing (The Kushi Institute)

www.ppnf.org... (Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation)

==============================================================================



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 03:33 AM
link   
Thanks for posting that info. That's a good starting point and illustrates that it is waaaay more complex than "acid is bad and alkali is good and pH is all you need to worry about"


We've been using the SunFlower Lecithin mix now for a while and the wife had decided she actually likes the taste, so another one for your weird taste bud club MegaMind


Personally, i find the SFL just as disgusting as the Soy Lecithin, just in a slightly different way!

Wonderful to hear about the success with arthritis pain Gizmoto - it's time to get Mum on the juice

edit on 26-6-2012 by RogerT3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 04:20 AM
link   
Glad to see everyone is still going strong


So I'm hitting my 4th week now, it's great it's helped me change my life dramatically, my fiancée and I are now on a healthy diet of steamed spinach, beans, broccoli, carrot, asparagus and silverbeet, and steamed chicken and raw undated nuts

I've already lost 6 kilos in the past 3 weeks it's fantastic, the lipo C is still working great, I have plateaued somewhat, I no longer get the "buzz" from it but I still feel good everyday and sleep fantastically every night! So nothing has changed basically haha, still loads of energy, sex drive is still great and I'm also taking a zinc supplement by swisse, my partner has lost a steady kilo the last 2 weeks and 3 centimeters off her waist! She was hesitant at taking it at first, and today she NAGGED ME to make more as we have run out haha!

I guess the biggest thing to note is that the dramatic change in my diet has also two folded the effects, if only I had discovered this 5 years ago! Wow!



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 08:16 AM
link   
reply to post by AlanQaida
 
Great going Alan!

My wife and I have had similar stories and experience with LipoC. We are in our 3rd week and the benefits have been outstanding, to say the least. We both sleep well at night but when my wife told me she no longer has that nagging pain in her left knee, it made my day. She can bend down and stand up quickly and her pain is non-existent. Nor does she have it when she does her gardening or walking. That, to me, is a good news story, if I ever had one.

Besides that, the energy boost is still there. We have not had any upper respiratory ailment (knock on wood) and we don't complain at all about bedroom business (ahem). So, things are fabulous!


edit on 26-6-2012 by Jaellma because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 07:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by MegaMind
reply to post by kaylaluv
 


Also you can make your own sodium ascorbate using baking soda and ascorbic acid.

From my research of the aluminum thing I have found that nearly all baking soda today is aluminum free. (not to be confused with baking powder - some aluminum free, some not). Arm and Hammer's baking soda doesn't say it is but people who have contacted them said the company told them it was aluminum free. Even the baking soda company (Bob's?) that advertises itself as aluminum free is going to remove that from the label because being aluminum free is now the industry standard.


Yes, you’re right that Arm & Hammer baking soda does NOT contain aluminum. The flap about aluminum came about by confusing Baking Soda with certain kinds of Baking POWDER.

However, Bob’s Red Mill Baking Soda is made differently from Arm & Hammer:

What is the difference between Bob's Red Mill Baking Soda and regular Baking Soda?

"Some other companies chemically produce their baking soda by creating a chemical reaction between soda ash and carbon dioxide (like Arm & Hammer).” *

“Our (Bob’s Red Mill) Baking Soda is from Sodium Bicarbonate which is naturally occurring in northwestern Colorado. In the mining process, water is used to extract the sodium bicarbonate and no chemicals are used.”

* "ARM & HAMMER® Baking Soda is made from soda ash, also known as sodium
carbonate. To make ARM & HAMMER® Baking Soda, the soda ash is mined in the form
of an ore called trona. The soda ash is then dissolved into a solution through
which carbon dioxide is bubbled and sodium bicarbonate precipitates out, forming Baking Soda. "

I want the purest product for the purposes of Lipo Encapsulaton. It’s up to you, but remember this stuff is going directly into your blood.

www.mulondon.com...

www.enotes.com...

The infamous Baking POWDER (like “Clabber Girl”) which contains sodium aluminum sulfate:

“Baking powders that contain both fast- and slow-acting acids are double acting; those that contain only one acid are single acting. By providing a second rise in the oven, double-acting baking powders increase the reliability of baked goods by rendering the time elapsed between mixing and baking less critical, and this is the type most widely available to consumers today. Double-acting baking powders work in two phases; once when cold, and once when hot. Common low-temperature acid salts include cream of tartar and monocalcium phosphate (also called calcium acid phosphate). High-temperature acid salts include sodium aluminum sulfate, sodium aluminum phosphate, and sodium acid pyrophosphate.”

en.wikipedia.org...

AV



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 07:23 PM
link   

Originally posted by Kerberos007
reply to post by AuranVector
 



More information on the acidity/alkalinity of foods:
=======================================

The issue of acid and alkaline foods is a confusing one, because there are several different ways of using these words with respect to food.

The pH of foods

In food chemistry textbooks that take a Western science approach to foods, every food has a value that is called its "pH value." pH is a special scale created to measure how acidic or alkaline a fluid or substance is. It ranges from 0 (most acidic) to 14 (most alkaline) with 7.0 being neutral. One way of thinking about it is that as you get closer to 7.0 from either end, the food becomes less acidic (6.0 vs 5.0, for example) or less alkaline (8.0 vs 9.0, for example).

Limes, for example, have a very low pH of 2.0 and are highly acidic according to the pH scale. Lemons are slightly less acidic at a pH of 2.2. Egg whites are not acidic at all, and have a pH of 8.0. Meats are also non-acidic, with a pH of about 7.0.

Many vegetables lie somewhere in the middle of the pH range. The pH of asparagus, for example, is 5.6; of sweet potatoes, 5.4; of cucumbers, 5.1; of carrots, 5.0; of green peas, 6.2; of corn, 6.3. Tomatoes fit on the pH scale toward the more acidic end in comparison to other vegetables. Their pH ranges from 4.0 to 4.6. However, this range is still higher (less acidic) than fruits like pears (with a pH of 3.9) or peaches (with a pH of 3.5) or strawberries (3.4) or plums (2.9).

Acid-forming foods

Another way to talk about food acidity is not to measure the acidity of the food itself, but the to measure changes in the acidity of body fluids once the food has been eaten. In other words, from this second perspective, a food is not labeled as "acidic," but instead as "acid-forming."

Although the idea of acid-forming foods goes back almost 100 years in the research, there's been very little research published in this area until fairly recently. In earlier publications, acid-forming foods were often talked about as key components of an "acid-ash diet." The term "ash" was used much more commonly in those days to refer to the inorganic components of a diet (mineral elements or molecules not containing carbon) that remained after the digestion and metabolism of food had occurred. This ash was also commonly referred to as a "residue" of the diet. Diets largely devoid of meat, fish, eggs, cheese, and grains were described as "alkaline-ash diets." These diets focused on consumption of fruits and vegetables and also included cow's milk. By contrast, diets containing large amounts of meat, fish, eggs, cheese and grains were described as "acid-ash diets."

Although the term "ash" is seldom used in current research studies on diet, the idea of acid-forming foods has remained a topic of research interest. A new term has been created in the research world to refer to the potential impact of certain foods on the kidneys and urine acid levels. This term is "potential renal acid load" or PRAL. For meats, a PRAL value of 9.5 has been reported by researchers. Alongside of meats in terms of high PRAL value are cheeses (8.0), fish (7.9), flour (7.0), and noodles (6.7). In contrast with these high PRAL values are the values for fruits (-3.1), vegetables (-2.8), fruits, and cow's milk (1.0).

Researchers have been concerned about one particular aspect of high-PRAL food intake, and that concern involves bone health. It's always important for our bloodstream to keep acidity under control. Our kidneys, lungs, and other organ systems work hard to keep our blood pH very close to 7.4. However, if presented with too many acids from the digestion and metabolism of food, our body will try to neutralize those acids using a process called buffering. To buffer an acid, our body needs to link the acid with another chemical called a "base." Sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium are minerals that readily form bases for our body to use as acid buffers. One readily available source for calcium is bone, and researchers have wondered whether a diet that is overly acid-forming will place too heavy demands on our bone for calcium buffers. There's some research that suggests this process may take place over the short run (60 days or less), but the long-term impact of excess acid-forming foods in the diet on bone calcium is not clear from studies to date.

============================================================

To be continued in the next post.


Thank you, Kerberos007, for posting this info. This is the clearest explanation of the acid/alkali issue I've read yet.



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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I thought I would post my status. Now im not sure if i missed a step or maybe im younger than most on this forum, but I didn't get any real noticeable changes. The first day I took just the one teaspoon and got like a fuzzy head feeling. I was focused but no energy jolt. 2nd day tried two teaspoons and was about the same. My only guess is that i missed a step in there somewhere. I will try to make another batch to see if my results change. I did however try just the AA one tablespoon stirred in juice and I felt amazing for the entire day..Any advice as to what i may have done wrong.

I did
3 tablespoon lechin(non gmo), blend for about 3 mins in 1 cup hot water
1 tablespoon of Now AA, dissolved completely in 1 cup room temp water
Blended both together then ran in the ultra cleaner for a good 30 mins.

I noticed i had a good bit of orange color in my mix and a good bit of that settled near the bottom. Just sitting there i get a milky look. Am I to stir this before I drink some? Any advice would be awesome.. Thanks ats



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by LerroyJenkins
 

Was your lecithin granular or liquid? Some have had trouble with liquid (soy) lecithin not dissolving well. Otherwise, not sure! Many of us will also let the lecithin soak in its water for at least 30 minutes too. Sounds like you did everything right. I can't say that I get a lot of extra energy, per se, from the mix. As someone else has noted, it's more a clarity of mind and ability to focus, hence we can seem to get more done in a shorter amount of time. Plus, since my joints feel better, I feel more like moving around. Sounds like achy joints are not an issue for you!

I think the mental perks largely come from the lecithin, as it is very good for the brain and nervous system. But, I'm sure the C doesn't hurt matters there either. I'm convinced somehow the formula gets past the "blood brain barrier" and is very good for the brain.

I've just made my first batch to GIVE away to my sister-in-law who has a lot of pain in her knee. In fact, she's going in for a knee replacement in August. She said she has to take 3 500 mg pills of vit. c everyday anyway, so she is up for trying this. Sure would be cool if it could bring her some pain relief. I was inspired to do this after reading about Jaellma's wife and the relief she has gotten for her knee pain. So, thanks for sharing, Jaellma! Keep the stories coming!



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