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Our Mind and Body as a Weapon - Martial Arts and Proper Training

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posted on May, 31 2012 @ 09:18 AM
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Before I choose what particular Martial Art I want to focus on studying and signing up for classes on, I would first like to somewhat get into shape. I tend to be very physically flexible for nearly 30, yet my strength is not so great. I stand 5'8"/150lbs. I can not afford at this time significant exercise or strength training equipment. Do you have any recommendations for exercise methods for someone of my stature that require little or no equipment. Such as dips with a chair, inverted push-ups, diamonds, etc, etc.?

Also, what is a good method of meditation for maintaining focus with a program? Thank you so much for your time and sharing!

Mick




posted on May, 31 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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Here you go




Besides looking awesome, her workouts really work!
edit on 31-5-2012 by greenovni because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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Tai chi is a good art to start with and doesn't require a lot of time everyday.


edit on 31-5-2012 by buster2010 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 09:28 AM
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Honestly, if you're planning on signing up for martial art classes, they will teach you everything and build you up. And they would show you the proper method for your size and weight, just sign up now and everything will work out. You will be a bruce lee!



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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You can start by standing in a "Horse Stance". You can do so by keeping your feet at shoulder length apart, back straight and then bend at the knees. This strengthens your legs and your mind. Some Martial Art tests require you do this for a length of time due to it's rigorous nature.

Martial Arts is both mentally and physically challenging but only to the extent you are willing to take it.

Most of the exercises are kicking and blocking multiple opponents at once. This is pretty much what the Kata's, Hyungs, etc. represent in a dance type form.

I don't recommend any certain Martial Art but just know that some seem to represent raw power while others represent more agility or grace. You need to decide which one fits you.



I don't recommend going as far down as this guy can if you try this. Just bend your knees until it feels like it's gonna give. Maintain the stance as long as you can. You can go further down as you get better at it.


edit on 31-5-2012 by TheLieWeLive because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by mickd1337
 


No need to wait. Start the training now, you will get in shape quickly enough. They won't give you more than you can handle.

If you are wanting a hobby, and pretty moves, and tournaments, then you have a million good choices for martial arts.

If you are wanting combat training, I would recommend Krav Maga, Kenpo, and Escrima. That is a great combination of skills that are useful in any situation. They train hard, hands on, under real conditions, which is a big plus. They don't teach you to pull punches or fight for points, but they actually teach survival skills at almost full speed.

Rather than worrying about getting stronger or in better shape, start working on balance and flexibility. Those things are harder to learn and more important than strength.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 10:22 AM
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Originally posted by mickd1337
Before I choose what particular Martial Art I want to focus on studying and signing up for classes on, I would first like to somewhat get into shape. I tend to be very physically flexible for nearly 30, yet my strength is not so great. I stand 5'8"/150lbs. I can not afford at this time significant exercise or strength training equipment. Do you have any recommendations for exercise methods for someone of my stature that require little or no equipment. Such as dips with a chair, inverted push-ups, diamonds, etc, etc.?

Also, what is a good method of meditation for maintaining focus with a program? Thank you so much for your time and sharing!

Mick


An Insanity Workout or P90X Workout will get you in some serious shape.
Without spending alot of money on workout equipment.
xtreme90workout.com...
chinup bar, workout band or dumbells.
that's it.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 10:29 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 

I agree. The martial art itself will build you up, join right away. And I agree that flexibility and balance are more important.
but don't take Kempo, it's a joke and karate is far outdated krav maga on the other hand is real and practical. I would recommend Gracie Jui Jitsu and krav maga.
edit on 31-5-2012 by XxRagingxPandaxX because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by XxRagingxPandaxX
 


I don't like jiu jitsu by itself, but I wrestled in high school, and I have some judo and roman greco style friends, so the Gracie just doesn't interest me much. It is certainly dominating the UFC/MMA at the moment, so it appears to be very effective!


The Kenpo school I send my kids to actually teaches Kajukenbo which incorporates jiu jitsu, and other styles. It is a pretty effective style. Light years better than Tae Kwon Do, or some aerobics class, LOL! When I was growing up, my training was in Goju Ryu, but I don't see many people teaching it any more. It wasn't a very sophisticated style, I wouldn't recommend it anyway.

Krav Maga is definitely the easist to learn, and most effective to use. Just a couple of classes of Krav Maga will give someone useful skills they can implement immediately.

My kids Kenpo school also teaches Escrima as part of their regular training. I think learning to use sticks and knives is VERY important to self-defense, because you can almost always find a stick or a knife to pick up and use, or you might find yourself facing someone else with one of the above.

When picking a karate school, it is important to watch a class or two, make sure they are doing a lot of practical training, and not just forms. Make sure there is a qualified instructor for every 3 or 4 students. It shouldn't be 30 students following one guy at the front. Make sure they incorporate ground work, and holds as well as strikes. Make sure they don't teach too many things that involve grabbing a Gi, because in real life, people dont' wear Gi's, LOL!



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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Congratulations on your big step into the world of Martial Arts. With your raw physique, it sounds as if a speedier discipline will be a great place to start. For myself, I have a physique poor for kicking but I have good power, speed, and balance. Learn your body, become familiar with how it bends, balances, and twists. Do proper research on what your discipline will teach. Are you getting involved for the philosophical reasons behind the eastern arts, or are you just looking to kick someone's butt? These are things you should honestly ask yourself. Fitness and peace of mind are a side-effect of the philosophy, being able to handle yourself is another benefit.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 01:07 PM
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I am twenty seven years old, and have a diet which consists of dead animals, preferably fried, but pretty much any way they come. One would therefore assume that I have forty five inch waist and no stamina. As it is I am a thirty eight inch waist, and can push a hatchback car three or so miles without even bothering to tire.

I find that a quirky workout program keeps me mobile and strong. Essentially, do Tai Chi, but instead of having empty hands, go out to a charity store, and see if they have some four kilogram weights. Holding them while doing some of the moves which involve having the hands far out from the body is great for keeping everything good and trim, as it increases the resistance against which your body is moving, and if you want a real burner, just keep those weights in your hands, and do punches, slow at first, but progressively faster... say fifty in a row, starting at low pace and working up. You do that every day for half an hour or so and you will feel like a coiled spring, I garuntee it.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 07:02 AM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


What a great advice

There is a method that goes the other way I learned from my former kickbox and karate master.

You essentialy try to punch thin hemp strings with knots. At the end, serving as a weight, there is a bowl of water attached. First you try to punch the knots on different heights with your hands without spilling water.

Later, if you get blazing fast you have more strings to fight against, even with your feet.
That´s the difficult part because if you hit the string to hard, it will trap your feet with the other hanging strings.

Its a technique for maintaining precision and body awareness. Later, if you can hit any target in any reach on spot, you can practice with weights.

Know the nerve ending points of the human body. There´s no need for brute force if you can knock out a agressor with his own force. Be fast, that´s more valuable then pure force (to me).

"Ohne schweiß, kein preis"
"Without sweat, there will be no success"
edit on 4-6-2012 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



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