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Evolutionary anomalies, I think?

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posted on May, 30 2012 @ 06:39 PM
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It seems to me that evolution has a recipe that pretty much stays true to form. What I mean is, fish have scales, birds have feathers, other animals have fur or hair. The common connection is that these are all coverings. Evolution may have been responsible for the different variations, but they are still coverings.

Every species has teeth or no teeth (flies and mosquitoes have no teeth). Every species has legs or no legs. Every species has eyes.

Hard for me to put it into words, but what I'm getting at is that, for the most part, evolution creates the same traits over and over. Some creatures have small legs, others long legs. Small teeth, large fangs.

And then along comes a couple of creatures that evolved something that must have come from a totally different recipe. It's as if the DNA of one particular species said to itself, "Should I grow longer legs and sharper teeth? Oh wait, I know! I'm going to have this creature crap out a stringy substance that it can make a web out of!"

Another set of DNA said, "This creature needs a better defense mechanism. Develop claws for digging holes real fast? Wings? No, I know! I'll have this creature develop a sack that contains a stink that no creature will mess with!"

Of course these creatures are the spider and the skunk. How could evolution possibly come up with something so out of the ordinary?



edit on 5/30/2012 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 30 2012 @ 06:50 PM
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It didn't.
And how about humans who have no feathers or fur to protect them from the elements of the environmen, no long sharp fangs, no long claws, for protection, digging or killing food, and are physically weaker than their ape cousins?
Evolution didn't happen the way we were told.
More likely it didn't happen at all, at least not on Earth.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 

It seems to me that evolution has a recipe that pretty much stays true to form. What I mean is, fish have scales, birds have feathers, other animals have fur or hair. The common connection is that these are all coverings. Evolution may have been responsible for the different variations, but they are still coverings.

Hey! What about catfish and nekked mole rats?? OK. Birds I'll give you - FOR NOW - since I can't think of any scaled birds, and birds are just dinosaur remnants.

Every species has teeth or no teeth (flies and mosquitoes have no teeth). Every species has legs or no legs. Every species has eyes.

Hey! What about starfish?? And "Every species has teeth or no teeth" and "Every species has legs or no legs" is just cheap - either you've got something, or you don't. Weasel!


Hard for me to put it into words, but what I'm getting at is that, for the most part, evolution creates the same traits over and over. Some creatures have small legs, others long legs. Small teeth, large fangs.

So to quote Azeem, what you're trying to say is "Allah loves a wondrous variety"?


And then along comes a couple of creatures that evolved something that must have come from a totally different recipe. It's as if the DNA of one particular species said to itself, "Should I grow longer legs and sharper teeth? Oh wait, I know! I'm going to have this creature crap out a stringy substance that it can make a web out of!"

Another set of DNA said, "This creature needs a better defense mechanism. Develop claws for digging holes real fast? Wings? No, I know! I'll have this creature develop a sack that contains a stink that no creature will mess with!"

Of course these creatures are the spider and the skunk. How could evolution possibly come up with something so out of the ordinary?

Oh, come on now - what about the Platypus, and the various creatures that came out of the precambrian explosion that fit no known mold, or the various different types of species-linking that make no sense (such as animals which as supposedly related based on body structure or various other classification methods, but share other widely-dissimilar traits such as proteins or amino acids that only match other species FAR away from them on the "tree of life" and so forth?

Very interesting subject, thanks much for posting. The world is definitely strange, and while there might be some very good and simple explanations for these and the multitude of other complaints, I haven't yet seen them and the examples are incredibly varied.

Take care.
edit on 5/30/2012 by Praetorius because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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Nice thinking
This is a subject I'm still pondering.

Were given two choices, its evolution, or god did it all.
It's like death, were given 2 choices, it all goes black or we go to see god.

We need to get out the box and look at all possibilties.

I'm not religious so always opted for evolution. However I find there are things wrong with evolution, for example the Cambrian explosion needs some explaining if you ask me.

Personaly I'm coming round to the idea that life on earth was at some point messed with.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 

The reason these things happen is because the animals need them, for whatever reason. for example, snakes once had legs, then they did not need them, now some snakes can be found with legs again. Also, not all species have eyes, there was a species found in a cave somewhere that had no eyes, only small spots where eyes should be. The reason for this is because they were exposed to no light, therefore, over several generations, they lost their eyes.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:17 PM
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What I find fascinating is how we all face one direction, and how one side of our bodies is mirrored on the other side. There are few animals on this planet that are exceptions to this rule.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 07:34 AM
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Originally posted by circlemaker
What I find fascinating is how we all face one direction, and how one side of our bodies is mirrored on the other side. There are few animals on this planet that are exceptions to this rule.

It's called bilateral symmetry and like many other common traits, it's due to hox genes. The trait first appeared ~570 million years ago, and it clearly provided an evolutionary advantage as > 99% of modern animals belong to Bilateria lineage..
edit on 31-5-2012 by rhinoceros because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by VoidHawk
However I find there are things wrong with evolution, for example the Cambrian explosion needs some explaining if you ask me.

Could you be a little bit more specific?



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by Praetorius
Oh, come on now - what about the Platypus, and the various creatures that came out of the precambrian explosion that fit no known mold, or the various different types of species-linking that make no sense (such as animals which as supposedly related based on body structure or various other classification methods, but share other widely-dissimilar traits such as proteins or amino acids that only match other species FAR away from them on the "tree of life" and so forth?

Are you talking about convergent evolution? What about it?



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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Originally posted by jiggerj
Hard for me to put it into words, but what I'm getting at is that, for the most part, evolution creates the same traits over and over.

No. No. No. For the most part, the same traits are around because of common ancestry.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by Praetorius

So to quote Azeem, what you're trying to say is "Allah loves a wondrous variety"?


That's exactly what I'm NOT saying. Creatures may look different but what they all come down to is legs, teeth. limbs, eyes, or none of the above. Even that poor platypus has the same physical accoutrements as all other species.

Then along comes the electric eel and we have to say, "WHOA, how did that happen in evolution??" How did the DNA recipe build an electric generator wrapped in meat?

How could DNA be that smart???



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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Originally posted by rhinoceros

Originally posted by VoidHawk
However I find there are things wrong with evolution, for example the Cambrian explosion needs some explaining if you ask me.

Could you be a little bit more specific?


Kind of a big bang when animals exploded onto the scene from simple organisms. First there were none, and then BOOM, complex organisms everywhere.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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Great topic, really makes you think.

It seems the spider has always been around as an insect killer. Keeps their population under control it seems.
About the skunk, I really can't think of any ancient organism that it could have stemmed from. I start thinking of the octopus, but it's a totally different body structure, but it has a similar defense mechanism.

A couple of posters have replied with seemingly correct answers. Studying evolution shows that the traits that are present today, have been needed by those organisms. It creates a balance on Earth.
The skunk uses it's spray to ward off it's predators. The spider creates a web from it's butt to catch food. The eel uses electricity to both shock and stun it's prey.

Those all seem weird, until you look at us Humans. Most are basically controlled by our ego (which seems like a flaw, because it creates a whole lot of psychological problems, most noted BIGOTRY!!!!). We have a lot of "weird" traits about us.

Too bad spiders and skunks don't have forums, or they'd be bashing us for our constant needs and our dependence on emotions (which are electro/chemical signals in our brain, that we attach labels to once we are taught connections to those emotions)



posted on Jun, 1 2012 @ 06:38 AM
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Originally posted by jiggerj

Originally posted by rhinoceros

Originally posted by VoidHawk
However I find there are things wrong with evolution, for example the Cambrian explosion needs some explaining if you ask me.

Could you be a little bit more specific?


Kind of a big bang when animals exploded onto the scene from simple organisms. First there were none, and then BOOM, complex organisms everywhere.

Oh I know what the Cambrian explosion was. It didn't happen like "BOOM" but over a ~100 million year period. That is a long time. Look what happened to mammals in just 65 million years, from mouse-like ancestors to humans, whales, tigers, bats, rhinos, elephants, etc..
edit on 1-6-2012 by rhinoceros because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 01:06 PM
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Great topic OP, One thing has always bothered me about evolution, I can thoroughly understand that animals need to adapt their bodies to their surroundings for food and climate ( fur, feathers, claws, teeth etc...) but the thing that I cant wrap my head around is camouflage. How did the genes develop the process or understanding ( I’m not saying they are sentient by the way) that certain patterns and colours will blend into the background? How did stick insects learn how to become sticky? Butterflies and moths having the patterns of large eyes on their wings to put off predators.

What i'm trying to say in my weird had to many beers way is, how did nature develop complex camouflage techniques? Is there any evidence in the evolutionary system to show how this developed? [



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Cool topic!


Virus' have always fascinated and amazed me. They aren't considered a life form, but yet they need a host to survive and they reproduce. They seem to be intellegent, given how rapidly they mutate. Without them, we wouldn't be here.


The origins of viruses in the evolutionary history of life are unclear: some may have evolved from plasmids – pieces of DNA that can move between cells – while others may have evolved from bacteria. In evolution, viruses are an important means of horizontal gene transfer, which increases genetic diversity.[7]
en.wikipedia.org...


T biologicphage


Influenza


HIV



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 01:37 PM
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Originally posted by windword


HIV



Good stuff, Wind! And this masterpiece was formed by unintelligent, unthinking evolution? I don't think so.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 01:44 PM
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Originally posted by windsorblue
Great topic OP, One thing has always bothered me about evolution, I can thoroughly understand that animals need to adapt their bodies to their surroundings for food and climate ( fur, feathers, claws, teeth etc...) but the thing that I cant wrap my head around is camouflage. How did the genes develop the process or understanding ( I’m not saying they are sentient by the way) that certain patterns and colours will blend into the background? How did stick insects learn how to become sticky? Butterflies and moths having the patterns of large eyes on their wings to put off predators.

What i'm trying to say in my weird had to many beers way is, how did nature develop complex camouflage techniques? Is there any evidence in the evolutionary system to show how this developed? [



As for those eye patterns, the moth's DNA had to know what eyes look like, had to decide to put one eye on each wing, and put them in exactly the right place on each wing to make them look like a genuine set of eyes. That's a whole lot for evolution to do without any intelligence behind it.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 

Just read the ' First Residents of Eden', well done sir, enjoyed it. have you wrote anything else?



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by jiggerj

Originally posted by windsorblue
Great topic OP, One thing has always bothered me about evolution, I can thoroughly understand that animals need to adapt their bodies to their surroundings for food and climate ( fur, feathers, claws, teeth etc...) but the thing that I cant wrap my head around is camouflage. How did the genes develop the process or understanding ( I’m not saying they are sentient by the way) that certain patterns and colours will blend into the background? How did stick insects learn how to become sticky? Butterflies and moths having the patterns of large eyes on their wings to put off predators.

What i'm trying to say in my weird had to many beers way is, how did nature develop complex camouflage techniques? Is there any evidence in the evolutionary system to show how this developed? [



As for those eye patterns, the moth's DNA had to know what eyes look like, had to decide to put one eye on each wing, and put them in exactly the right place on each wing to make them look like a genuine set of eyes. That's a whole lot for evolution to do without any intelligence behind it.

You just don't understand how evolution works. The moth doesn't know what eyes look like. It doesn't know it has eye patterns in its wings. Its DNA certainly isn't aware of it. The moths that happened to have something that resembled eyes on their wings were less likely to have been weeded out by predators. There's natural variation in their progeny. Repeat this selection over and over and you end up with a pattern that looks more and more realistic. There's a crab species in Japan that has a pattern on its back that looks like a face of a samurai. The reason for this is, that over generations fishermen have tended to release the crabs that have the samurai marking. That's how these traits evolved over time..
edit on 3-6-2012 by rhinoceros because: (no reason given)



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