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Shipwrecks shed new light on Roman-era navigation

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posted on May, 30 2012 @ 12:19 PM
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Thought some here might like to read this.
I have seen some of the Roman artifacts from costal finds.
Is it any wonder that folks don't just bump into stuff a mile deep every day?

Shipwrecks shed new light on Roman-era navigation - The Guardian
www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/may/29/shipwrecks-greece-roman-era-navigation


1 day ago ... Greece's culture ministry says two Roman-era shipwrecks found in deep waters off the country's western coast disprove the accepted theory ...




posted on May, 30 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Link doesn't work.
2nd



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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brocken link



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 12:45 PM
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It was also on MSN. Here are two working links. Interesting find though.

OP's Broken Link

MSN Link



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 12:59 PM
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Maybe the reason they subscribed to the coastal trade navigation theory is because they never found any evidence to the contrary such as this. If the only wrecks you find are coastal wrecks, which are easier to find, then you might lead yourself to believe that ships only travel along coasts.

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
edit on 30-5-2012 by Mkoll because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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Originally posted by TheTardis
It was also on MSN. Here are two working links. Interesting find though.

OP's Broken Link

MSN Link


Sorry folks. I was asleep at the switch.
Thanks Tardis. I be link dummy ljb



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by Mkoll
Maybe the reason they subscribed to the coastal trade navigation theory is because they never found any evidence to the contrary such as this. If the only wrecks you find are coastal wrecks, which are easier to find, then you might lead yourself to believe that ships only travel along coasts.

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
edit on 30-5-2012 by Mkoll because: (no reason given)


You are correct imo. Look how deep it gets in the area.

The Mediterranean Sea has an average depth of 1,500 m (4,900 ft) and the deepest recorded point is 5,267 m (17,280 ft) in the Calypso Deep in the Ionian Sea.


The calypso Deep is a subduction zone.
Wow I never knew it was that deep, Over 3 miles.

Mediterranean Sea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mediterranean_Sea - Similarto Mediterranean Sea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by longjohnbritches
Wow I never knew it was that deep, Over 3 miles.


Whoa, neither did I... I always thought the Med was relatively shallow, nowhere capable of 3k's deep even in an isolated location.

Also, Mkoll - Gaunt's Ghosts fan?





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