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So, who discovered the location of the Equator? Who discovered the latitude zero? How?

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posted on May, 28 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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Okay, I want to know.

I read that a guy called Thomas Neale determined the location of the Equator in 1349. I don't believe it. People in Europe in 1349 not even knew that the world was a sphere.

So, I want to know: who REALLY discovered the location of the Equator?

The Equator is the exact distance between the North Pole and the South Pole. Who discovered it? And how?

When the first map with the exact location of the Equatorial line was published? Who published it?

When people started to know where the "Northern Hemisphere" ends and the "Southern Hemisphere" begins?




posted on May, 28 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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Good questions.
I am curious to hear some responses.



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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Okay...

I just found a map from BEFORE 1502 that has the CORRECT location of the Equator...


It's called the "Cantino planisphere":

en.wikipedia.org...


It was made in Portugal, and smuggled from Portugal to Italy in 1502 by Alberto Cantino, an agent for the Duke of Ferrara.

Look at the picture on Wikipedia.

It has a line with the name "Linha Equinocialis". And it's in the correct location of the Equator.


HOW THE PORTUGUESE DID IT?



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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People in Europe in 1349 not even knew that the world was a sphere.

Nope. Only the undeducated (and living away from a coastal region) would think the Earth was flat.
en.wikipedia.org...

Finding 0º latitude is not that difficult . Since Polaris is directly over the North Pole, the farther south you go the lower it is in the sky. When it is on the horizon, you are at the equator. Ta Da!



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by Phage

People in Europe in 1349 not even knew that the world was a sphere.

Nope. Only the undeducated (and living away from a coastal region) would think the Earth was flat.
en.wikipedia.org...

Finding 0º latitude is not that difficult . Since Polaris is directly over the North Pole, the farther south you go the lower it is in the sky. When it is on the horizon, you are at the equator. Ta Da!





So, who did it, Phage?

And when?



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by GLontra
 

Who? Any navigator who used the stars; Polynesian, Japanese, Portuguese...
When? Whenever they crossed the equator.

It's so obvious it's trivial.



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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I think you need to go back further a few years:



He was the first person to calculate the circumference of the earth by using a measuring system using stades, or the length of stadiums during that time period (with remarkable accuracy). He was the first to calculate the tilt of the Earth's axis (also with remarkable accuracy). He may also have accurately calculated the distance from the earth to the sun and invented the leap day.[4] He also created the first map of the world incorporating parallels and meridians within his cartographic depictions based on the available geographical knowledge of the era. In addition, Eratosthenes was the founder of scientific chronology; he endeavored to fix the dates of the chief literary and political events from the conquest of Troy.

Eratosthenes' calculations fostered the persistence of belief in the sphericity of the earth that ultimately allowed for the development of the concept of antipodes and an early theory of climatic zones dependent on distance from the earth's equator.


en.wikipedia.org...

Then we have Claudius Ptolemy who came up with degrees of arc:


Ptolemy's coördinates are in degrees and minutes (360 degrees to a circle, 60 minutes to a degree), just like our own. His North-South coördinates (latitudes) are measured like our own from the Equator.


penelope.uchicago.edu...

I



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by GLontra


HOW THE PORTUGUESE DID IT?

 





posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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So, Eratosthenes calculated the circumference of the Earth. OK.

But did he also determined the exact location of the axis of rotation of Earth, and thus, the exact location of the North Pole, and thus, the exact location of the Equator?



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by GLontra
 

Knowing the Earth is a sphere and seeing that Polaris remains fixed in the sky as the sphere rotates, it doesn't take much to realize that Polaris is directly over pole.



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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The European Dark Ages all but obliterated many things that had been known since antiquity. As European society emerged from those times and began the "Age of Discovery" it was, more accurately, an age of re-discovery.

The ancients knew the world was round. The ancient Greeks calculated the circumference of the Earth by measuring the length of shadows in different locations. The Persians were highly sophisticated in astronomy, geometry and surveying, as were the Chinese. The Phoenicians sailed by celestial navigation. These are just a few of the ancient cultures who knew not only that the Earth was round, but were able to calculate the geometry and use it for practical purposes. The ancient Europeans themselves, prior to those Dark Ages, knew these things.

We can't really say who first made the discovery, as the knowledge appeared to exist from the earliest times we have surviving records for.



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by GLontra
 

Knowing the Earth is a sphere and seeing that Polaris remains fixed in the sky as the sphere rotates, it doesn't take much to realize that Polaris is directly over pole.



And who was the pioneer?

I just want to know who first determined the exact latitude of Athens, in degrees, related to the Equator...

Who did it?



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by GLontra
So, Eratosthenes calculated the circumference of the Earth. OK.

But did he also determined the exact location of the axis of rotation of Earth, and thus, the exact location of the North Pole, and thus, the exact location of the Equator?


Ptolemy's equator:

Have fun reading, I never really liked math myself...



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by GLontra
 

You've sort of changed your questions as we go.
The answer to your latest is probably Hipparchus.
edit on 5/28/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:23 PM
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edit on 28-5-2012 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:23 PM
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i was reading a story in Herodotus where Phoenician's, while in the process of circumnavigating the African continent in 800 b.c., reported that while traveling west around the southern tip of the landmass, the noon Sun was on their right side.

Herodotus didn't believe the story, as in the northern hemisphere such an event is impossible.

being that real science and 'discovery' only occurs in a laboratory environment, this direct experience doesn't support the idea that they understood that they had crossed the equator, but i'd suggest someone from among them figured it out shortly after.

and because such information would easily fall within the category of a state secret...people could have known about it for more than a thousand years before it became popular knowledge.



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by GLontra
 

You've sort of changed your questions as we go.
The answer to your latest is probably Hipparchus.
edit on 5/28/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



I didn't change anything.

The title of the thread is WHO.

You answered how, but not who...



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by GLontra
 

You changed your question from who discovered the equator to who determined the latitude of Athens.

The equator was "discovered" by some unknown traveler. Undoubtedly more than one.

edit on 5/28/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:27 PM
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Originally posted by GLontra

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by GLontra
 

You've sort of changed your questions as we go.
The answer to your latest is probably Hipparchus.
edit on 5/28/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



I didn't change anything.

The title of the thread is WHO.

You answered how, but not who...


Tell us who invented fire first.

There have been a few names listed in this thread who invented mathematical models, which can be used for finding the equator, including Claudius Ptolemy who made an equator in the relative position the current place it is.

I'm not sure what you need exactly.



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 05:27 PM
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If it was discovered in Ancient Greece, I just want to know the name of genius who determined that Athens was located about 38 degrees North, and thus, the Equator was located 38 degrees South of Athens...

I never said it was aliens.

I just want to know who did it, because Wikipedia is not your friend in regard to this subject...



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