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The Great Animal Orchestra with Bernie Krause

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posted on May, 26 2012 @ 10:00 AM
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Bernie Krauss has been recording soundscapes for decades, documenting what he calls the 'biophony', that is, the symphony of the biological world. His recordings and discoveries are absolutely incredible. He has been able to show how in a healthy ecosystem, animals and insects (and, to a degree, plants) all sing out their individual songs to create a discernible orchestra of sounds, and that humans historically evolved within this sound-scape.

I encourage you to listen to the interviews and videos below. It's quite amazing the songs of the natural world.


Bernie Krause's fascination with sounds in the wild has inspired him to record soundscapes where the wind, the trees and the beasts create their own soundscapes, literally find their own bandwidths for what becomes The Great Animal Orchestra ….a veritable symphony that has influenced what we call music.

He has been one of the world's leading bioacoustic recorders for four decades, chronicling what he calls the biophony ... the great, unscored symphony of non-human life that buzzes, chirps, roars, clicks, rustles, croaks, trills and howls all around us if we're close enough -- and closely attuned enough -- to hear it.


This guy's recordings are absolutely amazing. You can get some great snips of it in the links below...

Listen here:

www.cbc.ca...

www.cbc.ca...



In Krause’s world, everything is seen through the lens of sound. He even maps by ear. In one fascinating passage, he surveys a Costa Rican jungle, dispensing with the “100-meter square grids,” which anyway “nonhuman animals don’t understand.” He ends up with “amoebalike shapes, each an acoustic region that, while mutable, would tend to remain stable within a limited area over time.” Yes, I thought, as irritable honks floated up Broadway and through the window of my apartment: we all live on mutating maps, in the land of the audible, whether we like it or not. Krause offers endless odes to sonic nuances: the timbres of waves crashing on the world’s beaches, the echo effects brought on by dew, the acoustics of night and day, the dry, hot rattles of deserts, the way baboons bounce their voices off granite outcroppings, to send them deep into the forest. But at the same time that he wants us to feel sound’s sensual pleasure, he wants us to respect it as an indispensable tool of knowledge. Krause records a forest, before and after environmentally sensitive, “selective” logging. Though the forest appears mostly unchanged to the eye, the soundscape is devastated; the true damage can only be heard.

the healthier the habitat, the more “musical” the creatures, the richer and more diverse their scores. Sound complexity is a measure of health. As a musician, I am vulnerable to the argument that musicality should be the arbiter of everything, though I am aware the world does not agree. Krause does not shy away from corollary judgments. He critiques all of Western music, calling it “self-referential” and complaining that we “continuously draw on what has already been done, traversing a never-­ending closed loop that turns in on itself like a snake devouring its own tail.” (Is that a bad thing?) It lacks “true holistic connections to the soundscapes of the wild.” As an alternative, Krause describes the Ba’Aka (the Babenzélé Pygmies), attuned to every rustle and croak: “The biophony was the equivalent of a lush, natural karaoke orchestra with which they performed.


Read here:

www.nytimes.com...

www.independent.co.uk...

Trees Sing







posted on May, 26 2012 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 

I'm listening to the interview (radio?). It's really interesting.


"Did you know that Ants sing?"

"We have the sounds of viruses too, go figure that one out. LOL"

This guy is pretty unique.
The elephant recordings are beautiful but short. And a Jaguar too, in stereo and close to the mics! Oh my, wailing wolves! Haunting, 2 packs of them doing it. Tears to the eyes and a lump in the throat.

He's a pretty smart cookie, definitely one to watch. Thanks for sharing.


ETA Wow, correction on "one to watch". He's been doing it since 1968 or so!
He sounds so young, I guess it must be all those hours hanging out in healthy environments.
Unfortunately he says that 50% of the places he has recorded around the world in 3 or 4 decades of work are now sonically extinct when compared to when he recorded them back in the day.


edit on 26/5/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 


Yeah, the radio interview with the clip of the Jaguar recoding was my favorite part as well. The thing sounds like a freaking Harley.

I also really like how he can show how removing just one small piece from an ecosystem dramatically effects the 'song' of the entire area.



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 

Yep, he stated he had 4500 hours of natural sound-scape recordings from around the world. He is definitely using the scientific method, despite coming from a musical angle. His approach seems unique but incisive and goes to show how much life has been "killed", at least in the countries I have lived in so far. There are just a few birds here, sometimes the odd cricket but mainly just birds with their dawn chorus and coo-coo-ing pigeons in the summer afternoon heat.

ETA The bird is the word?

edit on 26/5/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 


Glad you enjoyed. A little bummed more didnt appreciate it as well. /sad face/

Nonetheless, I'm excited to be turned on to this and will be looking into getting my hands on his recordings very soon.

Legally, of course



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 09:40 PM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 

Unfortunately that is often the way things attention-wise. The good and truly interesting stuff gets ignored in favour of the more heated topics. You tried, I saw, that at least counts for something.



posted on May, 29 2012 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 


Indeed. Perhaps the two of us can just continue to periodically bump this with our inane banter



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 

We could do that but maybe it might be better to repost it at a later date. I think (but don't know) now matter how hard we bump it it won't get back on the new topics page.

ETA There was also a thread recently in Board Business & Questions why some threads get almost zero attention and others much more. Sometimes timing is key, ATS is mainly viewed by US residents so releasing an article in the early evening when more people are online is a tactic possibly worth considering.

edit on 30/5/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA

edit on 30/5/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Typo



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