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How Are Plants Aware of the World Around Them?

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posted on May, 25 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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I have searched around, but have not really found an answer to this question: Just how are plants aware of the physical world around them? Plants have survived near mass extinction events throughout the history of the Earth, and have always made a comeback, but in order to adopt to new living conditions and new animal and insect species, they need to know what is going on. What sensory capabilities to plants possess that allows them to be aware that a certain bird or insect exists? Symbiosis between plants and animals, and plants and insects, are well known. Some plants have adopted themselves so much that only a specific bird or insect can access the necter from it's flower and initiate the pollenisation process. Other plants have flowers that are especially bright within the ultra-violet spectrum. Apparently, some plants are aware that bees can see within the ultraviolet spectrum. Fascinating.
edit on 25-5-2012 by fockewulf190 because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 25 2012 @ 09:42 AM
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reply to post by fockewulf190
 


I have a plant at home that grips on things to extend itself. It goes directly to bars that are far from it, without hesitation. I should try an experiment with it and move the bars when it is close to it to see how it will react. The plant is suspended and doesn't touch the wall. How did it know where to go to get a grip on something?

I've come to think that maybe leaves are some sort of visual sensory organ. Not seeing as we do, but still seeing what is going on nonetheless.



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 09:47 AM
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www.theosophy-nw.org...

www.rawgosia.com...

my.aspb.org...

if u want more info on plants awareness just put in google plants awareness science

edit on 25-5-2012 by minor007 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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I should add that leaves are organs that absorb light. Not a far step from being able to decipher it, I would say.

And apparently, photosynthesis is done in the quantum state. Maybe plants have a consciousness residing elsewhere?

To an ATS thread!



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 09:53 AM
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i beleive there is a type of fern that if damaged or eaten it lets of a signal to the other plants which then alter their chemicals to taste more bitter.
it was on QI so it must be true lol



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by fockewulf190
 
We seem to take for granted things we see everyday and yes I agree plants are much more complex then first glance would have us believe.

My view is they do not have to know whats going on, just survive long enough to pass on its genes. It does this with thousands of seeds and fungi millions of spores. This is where I believe their strength to overcome change really lays. It is not a concious reaction but rather more like a spread bet.

The offspring that attract pollenators will go on to set more seed. If being selected for by a bee is an advantage to the bee and the plant a relationship will soon be set with the bee selecting for the most pollen and nectar which in turn means the plants that offer the most pass this on and we see the result in the sometimes very complex relationships that you mention in your OP. Akin to farmers selecting the best seed.

Most plants have roots and many actually 'defend' their plot from other plants by secreting toxins. There is also evidence that plants are sensitive to hormones/pheromones emitting from another plant that is infested with greenfly and even if the surrounding plants are not suffering an attack they to begin producing chemicals to resist insect attack.

Good subject OP Star and flag.



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by listerofsmeg
 


There is a tree in Africa that will kill you if you eat its leaves, by secreting a substance that will harden like cement in your stomach. Close trees of the same specie that are not attacked will immediately start secreting the same stuff in advance. At least, we know they can communicate.



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by minor007
 


What I am trying to find out is not their reactions to Indian musical instruments or the polygraphic results of electrodes stuck on leaves, I want to know what biological system a plant uses to identify and analyze the capabilities of animal and insect life within it's immediate vicinity. It must exist because observable symbiotic relationships between plants and other organisms proves that it does.

edit on 25-5-2012 by fockewulf190 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by fockewulf190
 


well if anyone can answer that they be having an nobel prize right now. No one really knows however if you take the gaia Theory and believe that quantum mechanics is the way our consciousness is achieved, then it is not too difficult to see how plants are aware. Quantum plays apart in all living systems and if at the quantum level everything is connected then there lies the answer to your question.

en.wikipedia.org...

www.nature.com...
edit on 25-5-2012 by minor007 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by colin42
 


Colin thanks for that reply. The plant world is full of mysteries, that is for sure.



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 07:12 AM
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Originally posted by fockewulf190
I want to know what biological system a plant uses to identify and analyze the capabilities of animal and insect life within it's immediate vicinity. It must exist because observable symbiotic relationships between plants and other organisms proves that it does.

the FLS2 receptor recognise bacterial flagellin (The "tail(s)" if you will, and is the major receptor that activates defense against biotrophic bacteria. The EFR1 receptor which recognise a bacterial elongation factor, is also quite important. CERK1 recognise fungal cell wall chitin. Loads of other receptors known of course, but those three are some of the most famous ones, due to their significance. For insects, defense relies more on the release and detection of various DAMPs from tissue that gets torn apart - SAR is quite important in that aspect.


Originally posted by minor007
well if anyone can answer that they be having an nobel prize right now.

Not really, but a few Nature papers.



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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reply to post by fockewulf190
 


Most of you answers are from evolutionary thinkers. I am not one of them. I would forward the notion that plants did not develop a system but were endowed with a system that allows them reactions to the enviornment. Some plants have retained this ability.
You may ask the mechanism for this system. I would ask what is the mechanism for your awareness of the ennviornment? Plants also sense and retain information only they don't have a centalized area to do so. It is diffused throughout the plant. That would make sense since plants can be cloned by cuttings.
We have vocal chords and other complicated mechanisms to allow speech, plant communication is on a much more basic level. IMHO scientist won't find it because they are not looking for it. I would speculate that is may be as basic as subatomic. If plants release a barage of yet undiscovered paritcles, or if quarks escape with messages, who would ever suspect the plant of doing anything? Just a thought, but I love the many examples of plant awarness listed here. '
Plants may also have souls. There is some research the shows missing parts of plants still appears in the energetic signature, just a missing humans limbs do...



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by listerofsmeg
 


i beleive there is a type of fern that if damaged or eaten it lets of a signal to the other plants which then alter their chemicals to taste more bitter.

I've read the Acacia plant does this. When one if getting nibbled by giraffe? It gives off a signal and all the Acacia downwind turn their leaves very bitter and poisonous to some extent.

AMAZING STUFF THAT!

I'll try to find the info and post it.

peace



posted on May, 27 2012 @ 01:58 AM
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Be careful with the implications of personificated consciousness/awareness in plants. Even bacteria can sense environment (including light), respond in complex ways and communicate. Are they conscious?



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 06:58 PM
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Plants aren't aware of anything. They don't even have nervous systems.

They can react to environmental cues, but these aren't conscious choices. Plants can react to things like phototropism (grow towards a light source) or geotropism (growing in regards to gravity). They can also react to damaged tissues through chemical release systems.

However, they are not aware of these effects.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 07:04 PM
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could it be because they are actually connected to the world? Or all they do is 'watch' the world around them. They've only ever been part of the world never trying to disconnect, they help make this world.

Its all part of the unconscious everything is created for special purposes, each end up helping the big picture even if they are unaware at the time.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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They are connected to the source field that holds us all in and eyes that see are not corporal. Spirit sees as well, in fact, Spirit/Soul coded the school and they can only the programs of sight sound hearing feelings emotions that they knew and understood. The programmers put themselves in the program. So trees have many capacities, plants, they sense when anything dies, and scream on a lie detector, but they are very sensitive to human input, so it has to be isolated. At night they will react even to bacteria being killed when you dysinfect. And they identify who is who. For example the one who mows the lawn is remembered in future meetings, even if they are pretending to be an artist and tree hugger.
edit on 7-6-2012 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 07:08 PM
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I believe they have a distributed network of electo-magnetic and electro-chemical sensors and nerve cells, rather than a central system.. our mistake is in trying to identify animal traits in plants...we must look for plant specific traits and functions.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 07:11 PM
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Originally posted by listerofsmeg
i beleive there is a type of fern that if damaged or eaten it lets of a signal to the other plants which then alter their chemicals to taste more bitter.
it was on QI so it must be true lol


I was just thinking of this.

It's the acacia plant that knows when Giraffes are approaching, or when one plant is being eaten it releases a chemical signal to warn all surrounding plants and they each respond by increasing a chemical compound immediately in their leaves to make them taste bitter.

I looked into this after I saw it, and I read that plants even respond out of wind path, so whatever signal they release it reaches out in all directions and is not carried on the wind.

It's fascinating, it proves awareness and communication, and it could even be argued that it indicates awareness of a community too. Why warn other plants? Does that indicate some form of emotive response?



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 07:25 PM
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I had to switch to a more friendly keyboard.

There are a lot of proven instances of plant communication and plants being able to identify other plants with a similiar genetic makeup IE clones vrs. other plants of same species but different parents.

If you think about it from an evolutionary standpoint, if plants are always eaten, trampled, torn by wind, ect....any being that has chosen to remain fairly stationary will need a genetic response to allow that. It would make sense not to invest one's nervous systems or sensing capabilities in a centralized location, but rather, to put it in nodes that are replaceable.

Now, we've got, IMO, a big problem in science with looking at nerve communication.

For instance, if L. Turin's theory of Vibration is correct for olfactory sensing, and I do think it is, then how does an insect communicate olfactory smell to their brain? IE if there are no dendrites, how does this communcation take place?

We've just got a lot of work to do but first we have to have scientists that really get quantum effects and neural networks - and, well, IMO too many of our scientists are graduating too fixed on their field of study....when what would really blow things open, IMO are more scientists and thinkers with more exposure to other sciences, because, IMO, everything is coming together. Biology/chemistry/physics/information theory.

Then there is a problem of access to this information. IE there's a text book on plant communication I'm drooling over, but it's 250 bucks.

I'm fascinated with it. Once I sat at an amusement park and realized that the trees were all bending away from the rides where there was a lot of screaming. I pointed it out to my party and then everyone could see it. A lot of times I can see plants doing things others do not noticed. I love them. I guess that is why, I dunno.
edit on 7-6-2012 by hadriana because: I put Lurin instead of L. Turin



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