It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Norway's Pleasant Prison Philosophy - The Holiday Version of Alcatraz

page: 2
5
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 25 2012 @ 06:55 PM
link   
It's really as simple as "if you don't heal the wounds, they will likely fester."

I am sure that there are numerous ways in which a society can effectually heal most deep wounds of uncivil activity. Ideally, a good judge would apply different methods for different crimes and different personality types, etc.

Nevertheless, bad judgment normally breeds bad judgment.
For judgment to be orderly, it must be considerate.
For judgment to be charitable, it must be effective.




posted on May, 26 2012 @ 10:36 AM
link   

Originally posted by LifeIsEnergy
Human rights is for humans, period. Not "good" humans, not "wealthy" humans, or "Israeli" humans, or "worthy" humans, but HUMANS, period. If someone is a danger to society, as I said before, they should be separated from society. But even they should be given the chance at compassionate and effective methods of rehabilitation, unless of course they don't want it. If they don't want rehabilitation, and are a threat to society, then sure, lock them up with minimal means for survival. But to spend $40k a year on each prisoner, many whom have the potential to be rehabilitated, to just lock them up in warehouses where violence, aggression and fear are the only means of rehabilitation, is not only illogical, but destructive to our society as a whole. These guys/gals come out even harder, more pissed and ready to do damage than they did before they went in.


Well said!

reply to post by CynicalDrivel
 


If you look at LifeIsEnergy's post above you should get a glimpse into whey a system along the lines of Norway's is the better way when compared with the prison system in America.
I am not thinking of a Norway system though for mass murderers or rapists as they are typically (most) high-level threats that should not be put in such a "free" prison system. I'm talking about the numerous people in prison for low level crimes that are resulting in overfilling prisons here in the US. Of course people along the lines of a Ted Bundy should not in my opinion be going into such a system.


Originally posted by Dasher
It's really as simple as "if you don't heal the wounds, they will likely fester."

I am sure that there are numerous ways in which a society can effectually heal most deep wounds of uncivil activity. Ideally, a good judge would apply different methods for different crimes and different personality types, etc.

Nevertheless, bad judgment normally breeds bad judgment.
For judgment to be orderly, it must be considerate.
For judgment to be charitable, it must be effective.


Well said as well! Don't think I could have put it better and in a simplistic way.
edit on 5/26/2012 by theUNKNOWNawaits because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 05:46 PM
link   
reply to post by NowanKenubi
 


I agree with your sentiment. My point was that they need to habitually repeat those same behaviors just to survive, hence they are not rehabilitated. Remember, all of us humans have those traits to some extent, but most of us are fortunate enough not to have to resort to that behavior. I'm not saying that the inmates were forced to do whatever they did to get sent to prison, but ought we not try to teach them a different way of living and decision making? Actions become an addiction once you've done said actions many times over. Putting them in a place where this kind of behavior and decision making is crucial to existence only reinforces their addiction to their way of thinking.



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 07:56 PM
link   
reply to post by brukernavn
 


Definitely, the way of living and decisions making prisoners need to survive in the American prison system, get indoctrinated into them after a certain amount of time. It may even be a quicker indoctrination, since a good number of prisoners most likely already were conditioned to this type of behavior/culture in prisons. It may even enhance these behaviors and this type of culture as the way to live.

Yes, your right. Actions if they have been indoctrinated in the person for a long time come to be like addictions in that they are habit's that seem natural to the person (like smoking). So, if their are prisoners who already were conditioned by their culture outside of prison similar to the ones needed to survive in American prisons, then why are we not indoctrinating behaviors into them that are truly rehabilitative by reflecting the proper and humanistic ones necessary for them to readjust back into society after a period of time (the point to prison, I thought)?

In those terms, Norway's system is better by far than the prison system in America. They are attempting to indoctrinate a humanistic way of living and making decisions, instead of indoctrinating or enhancing negative lifestyles and behaviors (America). Norway's system is truly the one attempting harder to find the best way to rehabilitate prisoners, while it seems the whole point of the American system is to not rehabilitate you and let you suffer with this indoctrination.

I still think there are some flaws in Norway's system that would need to be modified in creating the most effective prison system possible. But when these flaws are compared to the US prison system, in my opinion it is plain to see it would be most effective to develop a system more along the lines of Norway's, then America's.
To my eyes, there are some major core components necessary when constructing a new system, that are in Norway's. To my eyes, there is really not much I would transfer to a new system. America's system needs to get better, in my opinion.
edit on 5/26/2012 by theUNKNOWNawaits because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/26/2012 by theUNKNOWNawaits because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2012 @ 11:11 PM
link   
reply to post by theUNKNOWNawaits
 


I agree with you 100%. My country handles it's prisoners differently than yours, and although my country seems to deal with them better, it is not perfect. I think that a system where they are treated as valuable humans (every human is of value in my opinion) is the only way to go. I do feel that the prisoner needs to suffer, to a degree, for his/her actions. Although the need to rehabilitate is the most important factor, they need to realize what they did was wrong and pay a certain price for what they have done. Unfortunately in your country, most of those in prison are there for victimless crimes. The US has 5% of the world's populations, yet has 25% of the world's prison population? That does not compute in my mind. I mean no disrespect to you. You seem like a very intelligent guy whom I would likely be friends with if I lived by you. Ha det bra.



posted on May, 27 2012 @ 11:48 PM
link   
reply to post by theUNKNOWNawaits
 


Numbers don't lie, and clearly it's working...so I see no reason why they shouldn't at least start some pilot projects. The US prison system is awful, and it couldn't get much worse anyway.



posted on May, 28 2012 @ 10:56 AM
link   
reply to post by brukernavn
 


Agreed, those numbers do not compute in my mind either. They really should be eye openers for some people in the US though, that do not realize the problems going on with our system here in America. Changes are needed.

No worries my friend, no disrespect has been taken. I am not really in favor of any type of system here in America, when compared with those of Western Europe or Canada. Their seems to be a lot of things here that needs to be changed, but those in power sadly will never let it happen, unless it makes them money. They do not think in terms of humanistic concerns, but in concerns of how much money they'll make or power they'll get from the situation

Thanks for the complement brukernavn, and the same goes for you.

reply to post by MrXYZ
 


You are right it would be smart to try out at least a few pilot projects along the lines of the system in Norway. At least to see if the benefits Norway's is experiencing can work here in America. I think they would work.

Agreed, I do not think our system could get any worse. However, like I said before I do not think the leaders want to make it better. I personally feel they like it the way it is, for their own personal reasons.

Sometimes this country makes me feel terribly ill.



new topics

top topics



 
5
<< 1   >>

log in

join