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World IPv6 Launch June 6 2012

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posted on May, 23 2012 @ 08:50 PM
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"On 8 June, 2011, top websites and Internet service providers around the world, including Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, Akamai and Limelight Networks joined together with more than 1000 other participating websites in World IPv6 Day for a successful global-scale trial of the new Internet Protocol, IPv6. By providing a coordinated 24-hour “test flight”, the event helped demonstrate that major websites around the world are well-positioned for the move to a global IPv6-enabled Internet, enabling its continued exponential growth."



Major ISPs, home networking equipment manufacturers, and web companies around the world are coming together to permanently enable IPv6 for their products and services by 6 June 2012.


If you wish to test your IPv6 readiness? Use this test

(Source)
Worldipvslaunch2012.org
edit on 23-5-2012 by Daedal because: Grammar




posted on May, 23 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by Daedal
 


Thanks. I'm good to go on a five year old computer with a ten year old modem on a DSL account. I imagine my newer computers on Cable Broadband with new modem and router are as well.

This must have more to do with the ISP than the age of the equipment? I have a new router sitting here as I though I might need it. Apparently not. Wasted my twenty bucks at the sale.



posted on May, 23 2012 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by Daedal
 


funny how that 6 also looks like a lock doesn't it

got to love that 128 bit hexadecimal address
edit on 23-5-2012 by digital01anarchy because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2012 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 

Don't feel bad, I'm on a 10+ year old PC.
IPv6 works just fine here but it did need a little manual configuration. My ISP had a help page with instructions for all 3 major operating systems and provides the service or so-called "6-4 tunnel" that gives me my own IPv6 address and complete connectivity. For people that do not get it from their providers there are Tunnel Brokers on the net that can do the same, no idea if it is free though.

Even if the modem or your connection doesn't support it natively as is the case with mine (the modem is way newer than the PC I should add, but given "free" when you sign up for a year) the 6-4 tunnel makes it all work anyway. You do still need to run both protocol stacks though due to the number of sites that aren't IPv6 enabled yet.

edit on 23/5/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Typo



posted on May, 23 2012 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 


At work all I need is a functional computer that will run XP or beyond and play on the Internet during the boring times. At home I keep up to date as I use lots of cutting edge graphics and 3D modeling software and I'm constantly upgrading my computer. Office = cheap, Fun = expensive seems to be the equation.



posted on May, 23 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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Your IPv4 address on the public Internet appears to be xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Your IPv6 address on the public Internet appears to be xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Your IPv6 service appears to be: Teredo

The World IPv6 Launch day is June 6th, 2012. Good news! Your current browser, on this computer and at this location, are expected to keep working after the Launch. [more info]

You appear to be able to browse the IPv4 Internet only. You will not be able to reach IPv6-only sites.

Your IPv6 connection appears to be using Teredo, a type of IPv4/IPv6 gateway; currently it connects only to direct IP's. Your browser will not be able to go to IPv6 sites by name. This means the current configuration is not useful for browsing IPv6 web sites. [more info]

Your DNS server (possibly run by your ISP) appears to have no access to the IPv6 Internet, or is not configured to use it. This may in the future restrict your ability to reach IPv6-only sites. [more info]


Will someone please translate this for me?



posted on May, 23 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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I was off the net 15 months because the old 52kbs dialup was useless. My area didn't even have any cable, satellite or faster "stuff". We FINALLY (after 10 years of community effort) got dialup modem DSL.

My NEW 9 month old ISP - dialup modem DSL - supposed high speed WINDSTREAM connection just FAILED that test. I checked the Windstream ISP web pages and all we have so far are empty promises.
edit on 23/5/2012 by Trexter Ziam because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by N3k9Ni
 

I will try to translate.

Teredo, the company seemingly supplying your IPv6 service apparently has a few limitations. I must say I don't know much about Teredo though.

Then.

Your ISP does not have an IPv6 enabled name server. All queries will return an IPv4 address only, even if there is an ipV6 website record present. So when you type "www.google.com" in your browser it will always direct you to the IPv4 address. You might be able to get round that by using a free DNS service such as OpenDNS or similar though.

Hope it helps.



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 01:48 PM
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reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 


Can someone explain this ^ please?? lol

I was with the guy above, and now I am more confused.....



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by Chrisfishenstein
 

OK. Attempt number 2. Most people connected to the internet have an IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4) address. This is quite normal. The Internet runs on IPv4. However, due to the growth of the internet, the available addresses or, an analogy if you will, the available telephone numbers for new subscribers are almost depleted. IPv6 addresses this problem completely by increasing the available number of unique addresses by...exponential fold. It goes from a 32 bit address space to a 128 bit address space. The 2 versions are inter-operable but not "backwards compatible" so a period of technical change must take place, if you will. Still awake? Good!

DNS (Domain Name System) servers are the glue that makes the internet work. When you type an address into your browser such as google.com, it needs to be resolved, or, in English, the name you type needs to be translated into the IP address (think telephone number) of the server in question with the site on it you want. For me, google.nl resolves to 173.194.78.94. Without that number, internet doesn't work and most people remember names easier than numbers.

If it's still not clear, do please respond.


ETA Think of it as 2 internets, the existing and the new and improved version. They both run over the same cables and equipment but it is not available as standard to everyone that connects. So, in the case of DNS queries, or "What is the IP address of site X?", both the computer you are using and the DNS server of your ISP both need to be "IPv6 aware and/or enabled". It's not yet an "out of the box experience". I should have worked in marketing...
edit on 24/5/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Typo



posted on May, 25 2012 @ 04:47 AM
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reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 



Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
reply to post by N3k9Ni
 

I will try to translate.

Teredo, the company seemingly supplying your IPv6 service apparently has a few limitations. I must say I don't know much about Teredo though.

Hope it helps.


Teredo is not a company but an IP4 translation technology. Teredo tunneling enables you to tunnel across the IPv4 network when the clients are behind an IPv4 NAT. Teredo was created because many IPv4 routers use NAT to define a private address space for corporate networks.



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