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WTC7, the smoking gun that just will not go away until the traitors are rounded up

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posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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Jet engines do use oil for cooling and lubrication of some parts, bearings, reduction gears etc. Don't know about it being kept under pressure to keep it cool though, from what I remember at least on the engines I worked on, T-56 series turbo-prop and J52-P-8B turbo-jet, the oil was cooled by ram air using a heat-exchanger, and the oil/fuel heat exchanger (heat from oil exchanged to the fuel). The oil is pressurized so it moves around the system.


edit on 6/10/2012 by ANOK because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK
Jet engines do use oil for cooling and lubrication of some parts, bearings, reduction gears etc. Don't know about it being kept under pressure to keep it cool though, from what I remember at least on the engines I worked on, T-56 series turbo-prop and J52-P-8B turbo-jet, the oil was cooled by ram air using a heat-exchanger, and the oil/fuel heat exchanger (heat from oil exchanged to the fuel). The oil is pressurized so it moves around the system.


edit on 6/10/2012 by ANOK because: (no reason given)


It is exactly as I said; the engine auxiliary parts are cooled by air. The oil does not cool anything, however, oil heated by the proximity to the jet compressor and combustion tunnel is pumped to an air cooled heat exchanger.


waypastvne said,


Jet engines use oil as both a lubricant and for cooling. It is kept under high pressure to keep it from boiling.


Then DrEugeneFixer plowed in the discussion and mixed it up by introducing refrigerator mechanics.

The debate is whether or not oil is used as a coolant in a jet engine. Oil which is cooled does not make it a coolant especially if it only functions as a lubricant.



In a refrigerator the air from the food area is circulated to a heat exchanger and cooled by the R22 type gas.
edit on 10-6-2012 by MI5edtoDeath because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-6-2012 by MI5edtoDeath because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


The oil does lubricate and cool bearings, carbon seals, the reduction gearbox etc.


The MOP (Main Oil Pump) delivers hot oil from the engine oil-tank to the FOH (fuel/oil heater), used to prevent fuel filter icing. From the FOH the oil travels to an oil-temperature-control-valve used for rapid oil warm-up, and clogged oil cooler bypass. Hot oil is routed from the temperature-control-valve to the surface AOC's (air-oil-coolers) located in the fan bypass duct, to the FOC (fuel-oil-cooler) located in the oil tank, then the oil filter (located in the bottom of the gearbox/oil tank). From the oil filter cooled oil is routed to the oil-pressure-regulator, then to the oil jets, engine bearings, and seals. Only 20 percent of the cooled oil is required for lubrication, the other 80 percent being used to cool the bearings and seals. Hot oil from the bearing-sumps is returned by the MOP scavenge elements past an oil-temperature-pickup and chip-detector back to the oil tank.

web.me.com...



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


Dude, you lost, give it up. You'r making yourself look like "a gibbering village ijut".

If you want to see another example of the oil exiting the engines just click link below.

www.911conspiracy.tv...

Type 21 into the "go to frame" box.

Click the "go" button.

Wait for page to load.

Click the "next" button

Wait for page to load.

Click the "previous" button.

Click the "next" button

Click the "previous" button

Repeat as necessary.



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK
reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


The oil does lubricate and cool bearings, carbon seals, the reduction gearbox etc.


The MOP (Main Oil Pump) delivers hot oil from the engine oil-tank to the FOH (fuel/oil heater), used to prevent fuel filter icing. From the FOH the oil travels to an oil-temperature-control-valve used for rapid oil warm-up, and clogged oil cooler bypass. Hot oil is routed from the temperature-control-valve to the surface AOC's (air-oil-coolers) located in the fan bypass duct, to the FOC (fuel-oil-cooler) located in the oil tank, then the oil filter (located in the bottom of the gearbox/oil tank). From the oil filter cooled oil is routed to the oil-pressure-regulator, then to the oil jets, engine bearings, and seals. Only 20 percent of the cooled oil is required for lubrication, the other 80 percent being used to cool the bearings and seals. Hot oil from the bearing-sumps is returned by the MOP scavenge elements past an oil-temperature-pickup and chip-detector back to the oil tank.

web.me.com...



How is the oil used as a coolant and how does pressurising it keep it from boiling as waypastvne said?

You cannot cool oil by pressurising it; you end up heating it and with enough pressure boiling the oil. It is the opposite of what waypastvne said.

I never said oil was not used in jet engine lubrication.
edit on 10-6-2012 by MI5edtoDeath because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by MI5edtoDeath
How is the oil used as a coolant and how does pressurising it keep it from boiling as waypastvne said?


Heat is transferred to the cool oil.

Waypastvne is wrong AFAIK. It's pressurized so it moves around the system, it is cooled by a heat exchanger.

But higher pressure does increase the boil temperature of fluids. Water for example will boil at less than 100d on a mountain top.


I never said oil was not used in jet engine lubrication.


I know. I wasn't trying to argue with anyone just wanted to add some facts to the discussion.


edit on 6/10/2012 by ANOK because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by MI5edtoDeath

you end up heating it and with enough pressure boiling the oil.


This is why so many hydraulic jacks explode from over heating. It boils the fluid and BANG!!!!

Never use a hydraulic jack to change your tire, Its dangerous.



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by ANOK
 





Heat is transferred to the cool oil.

Waypastvne is wrong AFAIK. It's pressurized so it moves around the system, it is cooled by a heat exchanger.

But higher pressure does increase the boil temperature of fluids. Water for example will boil at less than 100d on a mountain top.


I agree with everything you have said and it is precisely the points I made to the two OSers.

There is nothing 'AFAIK' about what you say and don't doubt yourself. Check the veracity of your statement if you wish.



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by waypastvne
 





This is why so many hydraulic jacks explode from over heating. It boils the fluid and BANG!!!!


So how does applying pressure keep oil from boiling as you claim?



Never use a hydraulic jack to change your tire, Its dangerous.


As always reductio ad absurdum from an OSer.

The end of hydraulic jacks has been announced



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by MI5edtoDeath

I agree with everything you have said and it is precisely the points I made to the two OSers.



OMG... you have been arguing the opposite points for days!!! those most certainly are not the points you made!
edit on 6/10/2012 by DrEugeneFixer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by DrEugeneFixer

Originally posted by MI5edtoDeath

I agree with everything you have said and it is precisely the points I made to the two OSers.



OMG... you have been arguing the opposite points for days!!! those most certainly not


Double OMG! ...you never get it right. You are confused my friend and I ask you to reread your comments.

You have no reason to be ashamed of your confusion

edit on 10-6-2012 by MI5edtoDeath because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


Boiling point increases as pressure increases. Thus, to prevent a liquid from boiling, you can put it under pressure.

Ta Da!

You caught me in a typo, I caught you making up stories.



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by DrEugeneFixer
reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


Boiling point increases as pressure increases. Thus, to prevent a liquid from boiling, you can put it under pressure.

Ta Da!

You caught me in a typo, I caught you making up stories.


My observation is that you are an intelligent person who is consumed with hubris. I also do note that you have an aptitude for manipulating conversation.

Here are what I think of your pratfall setup;




Boiling point increases as pressure increases


You agree with me. Good and keep it up.




Thus, to prevent a liquid from boiling, you can put it under pressure.


You place increasingly hot oil in a containment vessel which usually functions as a heat exchanger to cool. This prevents boiling. To play your semantic games - the oil is under pressure due to its increasing temperature in a given space; please don't generalise with your 'liquid'.

You are agreeing with me again. Very good.



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 05:22 PM
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oil is used as a means of cooling parts in a jet engine. The oil is kept under pressure.

You were just making things up when you claimed otherwise.



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


So now that we are all agreed that " Jet engines use oil as both a lubricant and for cooling. It is kept under high pressure to keep it from boiling."Is there any thing else that you would like to complain about in my post ?

If you would like to know the pressure range jet engines operate at click the link below.

motors.shop.ebay.com...

Its the green ark.

Doesn't that seem like an awful lot of pressure just to move oil through the engine ?



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by waypastvne
reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


So now that we are all agreed that " Jet engines use oil as both a lubricant and for cooling. It is kept under high pressure to keep it from boiling."Is there any thing else that you would like to complain about in my post ?



I think you'll find that most people have agreed with you at all, completely the opposite. You were proven wrong on quite a few occasions, but you just don't know when you're beaten on something. Just gracefully accept, like a real man, that you are not right on everything, even if you think you are!



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by kidtwist
 


I've got a question for you Spork.

What happens to the boiling point of oil at 40,000 Ft ? Does it:

(A)... Boiling point remains the same.

(B)... Boiling point increases to a higher temperature.

(C)... Boiling point decreases to a lower temperature.

(D)... Potato.

Think Hard. Choose wisely.




edit on 10-6-2012 by waypastvne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by waypastvne
reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


So now that we are all agreed that " Jet engines use oil as both a lubricant and for cooling. It is kept under high pressure to keep it from boiling."Is there any thing else that you would like to complain about in my post ?

If you would like to know the pressure range jet engines operate at click the link below.

motors.shop.ebay.com...

Its the green ark.

Doesn't that seem like an awful lot of pressure just to move oil through the engine ?



No we do not agree.

The oil in a jet engine is not used as a coolant.

The oil is only meant to be used as a lubricant. You have to have oil hot to reduce viscosity and moved around. It is counter intuitive and this is the reason you are confused.

You will note from the image below that there are two ways oil is kept from "boiling"; through venting and with a heat exchanger. You cannot keep the oil under a closed system under pressure while lubricating a working jet engine's auxiliary parts. It will boil and cause an explosion; It has to be vented and cooled.




posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by kidtwist
 


He is mocking you because you blindly sided with the OSers when they were deliberately obfuscating their jet engine position. These things claim that jet engines are cooled with lubricating oil and you jumped on their bandwagon.

Why not cool the jet engines with gasoline...huh



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by waypastvne
reply to post by kidtwist
 


I've got a question for you Spork.

What happens to the boiling point of oil at 40,000 Ft ? Does it:

(A)... Boiling point remains the same.

(B)... Boiling point increases to a higher temperature.

(C)... Boiling point decreases to a lower temperature.

(D)... Potato.

Think Hard. Choose wisely.




edit on 10-6-2012 by waypastvne because: (no reason given)



The boiling point drops by a few degrees Spork. About 2 or 3 centigrade and your obtuse point is.....?.
edit on 10-6-2012 by MI5edtoDeath because: (no reason given)



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