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Who Here Is CPR Certified?

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posted on May, 21 2012 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by ILikeStars
 


Ya, I think so too, I just took big skips for the sake of brevity. I remember 12 to 1 and 15 to 1 as well. I also remember seeing different instructors teaching different things on the same weekend, LOL! The morning instructor teaching 8 to 1 while the afternoon instructor was teaching 15 to 1. Now they say not to worry about the breaths at all, unless you have a partner to administer the breaths, and then it is 50 to 1...... I think.




posted on May, 21 2012 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


The current ratio is 30 chest compressions to 2 breaths for one-rescue and two-rescue on an adult. The ratio is 15 to 2 for children. I believe the ratio was last changed to the 30:2 in November of 2005 by the American Heart Association/2005 AHA Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

Source/Reference can be found here on page 9:
Highlights of the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for CPR and ECC



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by ILikeStars
 


Yep, it appears you are correct. I found this tidbit...


Conventional CPR consists of chest compressions and rescue breathing. The American Heart Association continues to support this approach to CPR, but recent research demonstrates that rescue breathing may be unnecessary and potentially detrimental in cases of cardiac arrest. In the interest of presenting complete information, however, ACEP is including instructions on how to provide rescue breaths in this guide for laypersons who choose to employ them.


How to Perform CPR.

Also found This one which has a very quick and easy guide that can be printed and posted, and it has illustrations. It recommends the 30 to 2.

Mayo Clinic also says 30 to 2 for trained CPR people, but it says to give only chest compressions if you are a novice or untrained. That is where I got my number 100 from I guess. It says to give about 100 chest compressions per minute.

This is all great info, and making it out to a weekend course is a great idea for anyone. Doing actual compressions on a dummy is very, very useful information that will not be forgotten.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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Was first aid St John's Ambulance trained for 12 years.
First time I had to use it besides cuts and bumps was on my wife. She collapsed, later found out it was a PE (embolism)
Gave the full CPR for 11 minutes 'til paramedics came and took over. When it's your wife all your training etc goes autopilot.
I was knackarred, by the time they arrived; she died.
Hope I never have to use it again.

Am going to make sure my kids are trained though if they express an interest.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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With the nature of my job, I am required to have Advanced First aid, and CPR with AED. My job also requires me to have H2S Alive. TDG, WHIMIS, and a few other courses. Thinking about it, I have to renew them all again this summer, guess I will be spending some time in a classroom soon.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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In my health class, one of the requirements for the class was gettingCPR certified. I've got that, first aid, AND I took some certified babysitter course.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 05:36 PM
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Yup... fully certified...

That was the most boring day of my life too...



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 05:45 PM
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Because I work on an ICU I have to follow Advanced Life Support every 6 months (defib, cardioversion, intubation, medication etc.). It's so critical that so many people learn CPR. I had to use it a couple of times on the street when I wasn't at work. If the delay (time from beginning of the cardiac arrest till the beginning of compression on the sternum) is more then 3 minutes the brain is already taking too much (irreversible) damage. If the paramedics are the first that give CPR, the prognosis is very bleak because it usually takes more then 10 minutes before they arrive from where I live.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 05:53 PM
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I am. BLS and ACLS certified.

2nd



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 05:59 PM
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Didn't they change it...

1 rescuer CPR is all compressions and no breaths...the amount of o2 you are actually putting into someone is negligible, unless you happen to have a bag valve mask and a o2 tank. But then again that might be for 1st responders and EMTs only...don't remember.

Either way...
Current CPR
Current EMT in 2 states
Currently taking Paramedic...
As well as a slew of military combat lifesaver teaching and experience.

On a side note, some of the places out here are 45 minutes or more from a hospital...
Compressions for 45 minutes + on the ride to the hospital = 1 exhausted, sweat covered person by the time you get to your destination. I personally had 4 saves last summer...good feeling knowing someone is alive because of me and my partner!!
edit on 21-5-2012 by Acid_Burn2009 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by therealdemoboy
 


i am CPR Certified along with other first aide training. I am a first responder on my current job. I have never had to use it and hopefully never will.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 06:50 PM
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I have been to so many of those classes...Even wilderness first aid with the scouts before Philmont.

Don't want to do it ever again.

Every year they change some little detail, so right off I am doing it wrong from memory.

Let the young parents go, CPR is for kids, drowning, stuff like that.

Old people have a heart attack, better to let them go. Unlikely to do any good, only prolongs agony.

Last class I went to it was mostly all about the shock machine which since I am old can not remember the proper name for it just now. But the actual CPR was de-emphasized in favor of the machine.
edit on 21-5-2012 by kawika because: corectolated spel'n err

edit on 21-5-2012 by kawika because: add text



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 07:12 PM
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reply to post by PutAQuarterIn
 


Yes, this is true. The procedure may have changed since some of us had last been certified. I got my first certificate in 2006. I recertified in 2011. It had changed. You are correct that the breaths are not considered as important as the chest compressions. It is always good to know this. One never knows when it will be needed.
This link still shows a couple of breaths for every 100 chest compressions. I would state that it would depend on how comfortable you are in doing this if you do not have a barrier kit.
depts.washington.edu...


Have a good one.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 07:37 PM
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do it for your kids

my son got a piece of food lodged in the throat when he was sitting in his high chair. he had a complete airway obstruction. I grabbed him up, turned him feet up (like they teach in the CPR For children/infants) and gave him one back blow. No need to finger sweep because the piece of food flew straight out.

First aid is good to know too.

He's 19 years old now



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by kawika
I have been to so many of those classes...Even wilderness first aid with the scouts before Philmont.

Don't want to do it ever again.

Every year they change some little detail, so right off I am doing it wrong from memory.

Let the young parents go, CPR is for kids, drowning, stuff like that.

Old people have a heart attack, better to let them go. Unlikely to do any good, only prolongs agony.

Last class I went to it was mostly all about the shock machine which since I am old can not remember the proper name for it just now. But the actual CPR was de-emphasized in favor of the machine.
edit on 21-5-2012 by kawika because: corectolated spel'n err

edit on 21-5-2012 by kawika because: add text
AED: automatic external defibulator
This is the best first responder tool out there.

PS the little yearly changes are annoying. Having a good working knowledge is what important. Not knowing the little changes dont matter much if any to a succesful outcome. IMO
edit on 21-5-2012 by grubblesnert because: add PS



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 07:45 PM
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I get certified every 3 years, I'm current right now but I will have to go next year to get keep current. Nice thread, I like it!



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by novemberecho
In my health class, one of the requirements for the class was gettingCPR certified. I've got that, first aid, AND I took some certified babysitter course.
My daughter did all of the things you did and was the "go to" baysitter in our part of town.
Make up a flyer with your credentials to give out to the moms and dads with "babies needing sitting" you'll have an edge.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 08:12 PM
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In a survival/SHTF situation, CPR will be mostly if not totally useless.

The majority (vast majority) of heart failure is caused by ventricular fibrillation. The only way to save the person is to shock the heart (defibrillate). CPR only keeps blood circulatiing tuntil the paramedics get there with the debibrillator to shock the heart. If the paramedics aren't coming, CPR is not going to help.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by grubblesnert
 


Thanks!
My cousin is certified like myself, and she's one of te most asked for babysitters in town.



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 08:27 PM
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Originally posted by therealdemoboy
I haven't seen much about this discussed - so I thought I'd put out a little reminder that the Red Cross hosts CPR classes that are either sponsored, so they don't cost you anything - or are available at a nominal cost. Certainly worth the $$$ if you ever need to use it. CPR, First Aid, or for those who want to spend more time and money - an EMT course could prove invaluable in a SHTF scenario.


I am certified and what might interest you ( and make you look differently next time you are hospitalized) is that the cadence used for the heart massage is done to the beat of "another one bites the dust"

It is the perfect rhythm though...




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