SpaceX Delays Rocket Launch To ISS Due To Technical Problems

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posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:20 AM
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www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/19/spacex-aborts-rocket-launch_n_1529453.html

23 hours ago ... CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A new private supply ship for the International Space Station remained stuck on the ground Saturday after rocket ...

Well what do you all make of this.
edit on 5/20/2012 by longjohnbritches because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:31 AM
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I make of this that they delayed the launch due to technical problems. Hardly anything unusual for any space program..they're always delaying launches.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


Abort for this,

SpaceX Launch Abort Traced To Faulty Rocket Engine ...
[url]www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/19/spacex-launch-abort-faulty-rocket-valve[url]...

8 hours ago ... SpaceX Delays Rocket Launch To ISS Due To Technical Problems (VIDEO). CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A new private supply ship for the ...
SpaceX Launch Abort Traced To Faulty Rocket Engine ...
www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/19/spacex-launch-abort-faulty-rocket-valve...

8 hours ago ... SpaceX Delays Rocket Launch To ISS Due To Technical Problems (VIDEO). CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A new private supply ship for the ...



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:55 AM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Here is a little on the founder of SpaceX
Is this a fast and furious rise to replace an ancient institution.
One that should have remained in the control of the military,
where there may have been just a tad of accountability?



Elon Musk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elon_Musk - Similarto Elon Musk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elon Musk (born June 28, 1971) is a South African born inventor, engineer and entrepreneur best known for co-founding SpaceX, Tesla Motors and X.com, ...

SpaceX
Talulah Riley



In seven years, SpaceX has designed the family of Falcon launch vehicles and the Dragon multi-purpose spacecraft from the ground-up. In September 2009, SpaceX's Falcon 1 rocket became the first privately funded liquid-fueled vehicle to put a satellite into Earth orbit. NASA selected SpaceX to be part of the first program that entrusts private companies to deliver cargo to the International Space Station. This contract, which has a minimum value of $1.6 billion and a maximum value of $3.1 billion, has become a cornerstone of the Space Station. In addition to these services, SpaceX's goals include simultaneously lowering the price of orbital spaceflight and improving reliability, both by a factor of ten, while creating the first fully reusable orbital launch vehicle. In the coming years,



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:56 AM
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What do we make of this?
Isn't that the part where you should put forth your views? A little bit more substance in a thread would be nice...

Anyways, many of us were disappointed as per this thread on Space X Dragon Launch (especially those who stayed up late to watch it) but understanding that this is just the way with space launches. Safety first and foremost.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by Qumulys
What do we make of this?
Isn't that the part where you should put forth your views? A little bit more substance in a thread would be nice...

Anyways, many of us were disappointed as per this thread on Space X Dragon Launch (especially those who stayed up late to watch it) but understanding that this is just the way with space launches. Safety first and foremost.


Oh well I don't loose any sleep over these things.
It did piss me off a little though when I sat on my wallet and could feel my ass bone through it this morning.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 08:28 AM
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Terrific headline!
Silly me, I was thinking that as they started to release the holddowns as the engines roared to life that some bigwig said, "Say, why don't we do this business Tuesday instead of now?"



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 09:08 AM
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Originally posted by Aliensun
Terrific headline!
Silly me, I was thinking that as they started to release the holddowns as the engines roared to life that some bigwig said, "Say, why don't we do this business Tuesday instead of now?"


Reminds me of the old days lol,
When NASA would put a hold on a launch because of an unexpected thunderstorm.
What? How the hell could that happen in the Lighting capitol of the world?

Oh, oh then they would put another hold on the launch.
Oh oh then they would reschedule it.
To bad they didn't have a weather satilite or something.LOL
edit on
edit on 5/20/2012 by longjohnbritches because: re sat
extra DIV



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 09:26 AM
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Yes, read about it this morning. Apparently it fired off but didnt leave the platform. To me it sounds like the release clamps didnt... well... release.

I bet it was some stupid mistake like some technician not removing a certain locking pin. Such gigantic human endevours are usually foiled by incompetance in one way or another. Thats just one thing you cant take away from the military, dicipline.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by Monkeygod333
Yes, read about it this morning. Apparently it fired off but didnt leave the platform. To me it sounds like the release clamps didnt... well... release.

I bet it was some stupid mistake like some technician not removing a certain locking pin. Such gigantic human endevours are usually foiled by incompetance in one way or another. Thats just one thing you cant take away from the military, dicipline.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



I sort of agree to an extent. But I think you would not hear much about the military failures as they would most likely be kept top secret. LOl


jra

posted on May, 20 2012 @ 01:58 PM
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Originally posted by Monkeygod333
Yes, read about it this morning. Apparently it fired off but didnt leave the platform. To me it sounds like the release clamps didnt... well... release.


It's part of the design. The rocket engines will fire at full thrust while being held down to allow for a systems check before lift off. This was done for the Falcon 1 rockets as well as the previous 2 Falcon 9 launches. Seems like a good safety feature to me.

From: Falcon 9 Reliability

As with the company's smaller Falcon 1 vehicle, Falcon 9's launch sequence includes a hold-down feature that allows full engine ignition and systems check before liftoff. After first stage engine start, the launcher is held down and not released for flight until all propulsion and vehicle systems are confirmed to be operating normally. Similar hold-down systems have been used on other launch vehicles such as the Saturn V and Space Shuttle. An automatic safe shut-down and unloading of propellant occurs if any abnormal conditions are detected.


So the computer detected an issue and did not release the rocket and aborted the launch. The issue was a build up of pressure in engine #5. It turns out the problem was with a turbopump valve and replacement of that valve is already being performed.
edit on 20-5-2012 by jra because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by jra


So the computer detected an issue and did not release the rocket and aborted the launch. The issue was a build up of pressure in engine #5. It turns out the problem was with a turbopump valve and replacement of that valve is already being performed.
edit on 20-5-2012 by jra because: (no reason given)


Tell me jra are you not, just seething that these folks seem to be way ahead of NASA in just SEVEN short years?



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


I think when any group reaches a critical mass you have problems. In the early years, NASA was a powering force of innovations. But over time, people grow complacent in their job, no longer worried about eagerness to impress upper echelons.
A motorbike is swift to take evasive actions, where as an 18 wheeler takes a much longer time to react.


jra

posted on May, 20 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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Originally posted by longjohnbritches
Tell me jra are you not, just seething that these folks seem to be way ahead of NASA in just SEVEN short years?


Seething? Not in the slightest, why would I be? As much as I love NASA, they have become more and more inefficient and bloated with bureaucracy which has stifled a lot of innovation. Which is typical of any Government agency. With all the red tape, cost-plus contracts, pork projects etc, it makes it hard to do anything thing affordably. Just look at the development costs for the Ares I rocket and compare it to the Falcon 9. It's insane. I'm not surprised that a small private company can be more efficient than NASA.

I'm extremely happy that SpaceX seems to be doing well and pushing ahead while keeping the development costs low. It's a good thing for NASA too. Now they can focus more on the actual exploration side of things and doing more R&D, while letting some one else focus on building, maintaining and launching rockets.

I'm all for a mix of Government and Private spaceflight / exploration.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 08:37 PM
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Originally posted by jra

Originally posted by longjohnbritches
Tell me jra are you not, just seething that these folks seem to be way ahead of NASA in just SEVEN short years?


Seething? Not in the slightest, why would I be? As much as I love NASA, they have become more and more inefficient and bloated with bureaucracy which has stifled a lot of innovation. Which is typical of any Government agency. With all the red tape, cost-plus contracts, pork projects etc, it makes it hard to do anything thing affordably. Just look at the development costs for the Ares I rocket and compare it to the Falcon 9. It's insane. I'm not surprised that a small private company can be more efficient than NASA.

I'm extremely happy that SpaceX seems to be doing well and pushing ahead while keeping the development costs low. It's a good thing for NASA too. Now they can focus more on the actual exploration side of things and doing more R&D, while letting some one else focus on building, maintaining and launching rockets.

I'm all for a mix of Government and Private spaceflight / exploration.
Ah, well then Americans should see drastic savings in their tax bills in space related projects.
Do you see this as factual? What would be the anual budget reduction?
Does it seem strange to you that SpaceX is saying they intend to put PEOPLE in space within three years. And NASA has no manned space project on the table?
edit on 5/20/2012 by longjohnbritches because: hfs
edit on 5/20/2012 by longjohnbritches because: (no reason given)


jra

posted on May, 20 2012 @ 08:58 PM
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Originally posted by longjohnbritches
Ah, well then Americans should see drastic savings in their tax bills in space related projects.
Do you see this as factual? What would be the anual budget reduction?


NASA will certainly save some money by not having to spend around $3billion on the Space Shuttle per year. I'm not sure if American citizens will notice any difference however.


Does it seem strange to you that SpaceX is saying they intend to put PEOPLE in space within three years. And NASA has no manned space project on the table?


But NASA does have a manned space project in the works. It's called the Orion MPCV. It's one of the few things that has been continued since the cancellation of the Constellation program. But it will still be a while before it's up and running. So NASA still plans to have there own spaceship to use (assuming a future president doesn't come along and cancel it), as well as using private ones.
edit on 20-5-2012 by jra because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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Repaired SpaceX Rocket Set for 2nd Blastoff Try on May 22 at 3:44am

www.universetoday.com...
spacex.com...

I can't seem to find the page for the live stream of the launch.
Anyone knows?



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 08:52 PM
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Originally posted by intergalactic fire
Repaired SpaceX Rocket Set for 2nd Blastoff Try on May 22 at 3:44am

www.universetoday.com...
spacex.com...

I can't seem to find the page for the live stream of the launch.
Anyone knows?


Hi inter,
Thanks for dropping the link.
I hope things go better this time.
cheers ljb



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Found it
www.spacex.com...

and

nasa tv
www.nasa.gov...
edit on 21-5-2012 by intergalactic fire because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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Originally posted by Qumulys
What do we make of this?
Isn't that the part where you should put forth your views? A little bit more substance in a thread would be nice...

Anyways, many of us were disappointed as per this thread on Space X Dragon Launch (especially those who stayed up late to watch it) but understanding that this is just the way with space launches.

Safety first and foremost.



Docking Ready !:







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