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Stunning view of Lyrids Meteor Shower Timelapse Seen from the Space Station

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posted on May, 20 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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Just as the Lyrid Meteor Shower was peaking on April 21, 2012, astronaut Don Pettit captured this incredible timelapse sequence from the International Space Station. Of course you can see the familiar view of cities sweeping beneath the station as it orbits the Earth, but if you watch carefully, you can see the bright flashes of meteors burning up in the Earth's atmosphere. The timelapse was made up of 310 individual frames captured during that evening, which were then stitched together into a single video.




Check out this stunning view of Lyrids at night!! Interestingly, it seems that the meteor are somewhat together over certains areas.

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edit on 20-5-2012 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 20 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


You might be mistaking lightning for Lyrids.

I've watched the timelapse a handful of times, and only spotted one or two meteors.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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Pretty cool video. Did you see the triangle lights leaving earth in the last few seconds of the clip in the bottom left of video? Just like the ones in numerous videos taken from earth?


jra

posted on May, 20 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by FireballStorm
You might be mistaking lightning for Lyrids.

I've watched the timelapse a handful of times, and only spotted one or two meteors.


Same here. The majority of the flashes would have been lightning, thus why you see it flashing in various localized areas. But I too thought I saw a few streaks from meteors in there.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Question ?

How do none of these hit the ISS ?

How is that possible ? Are these showers that predictable ?



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 07:51 PM
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reply to post by LucidDreamer85
 


I had the same question recently.

Apparently the ISS is well protected from these little particles.


“I have no concerns about the space station. Even if the Draconids were a full-scale meteor storm I would be confident that the space station program would take the right steps to mitigate the risk,” Cooke said.

...Also, some spacecrafts are well protected for such issues. The International Space Station, for example, is heavily armored against orbital debris. “We don’t expect anything to go wrong there,” said Cooke.


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posted on May, 20 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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Originally posted by LucidDreamer85
How do none of these hit the ISS ?

How is that possible ?


Like the vast majority of annual meteor showers, there are very few meteors, and lots of physical space between them. Quite simply, during an annual shower like the Lyrids, there is much more chance of nothing hitting than there is of the opposite.


Originally posted by LucidDreamer85
Are these showers that predictable ?


Yes, and no...

Yes, meteor showers are predictable. In fact, the most recent computer modelling techniques have been shown to be able to predict the peak of an outburst to within a few minutes (Asher and McNaught 2001).

However, the predictions are only as good as the observations/raw data used to make the predictions, and in cases where the parent body of a meteor shower (usually a comet) is not known or is poorly observed, it's difficult to get accurate predictions.

The same is also true the older a dust trail (the debris/meteoroids that comets leave behind in their wake) - the older the trail, the less accurate at predicting where a given meteoroid will end up in space.

So although our annual meteor showers are not considered a significant threat to the ISS, there is always the chance of running into an unexpectedly dense dust trail, where the chances of a hit are significantly increased.

Having said that, it's unlikely, since the most dense trails tend to be trails that were laid down recently, and comet observations have been scientifically recorded for a few centuries, so we have a fairly good idea what is to come.

The other thing we can't predict is a new comet swinging by our orbit and making a new trail, but once spotted we can work out if it will come close enough to make a new meteor shower.



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