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Experiment In Sleeping, And Lucid Dreaming

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posted on May, 19 2012 @ 07:42 PM
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I have had this basic idea for a while, but never actually put it into action. I had an experience in lucid dreaming today that showed me that this would nearly definitely work as I planned, particularly if I put effort into it, so I think I have decided to really do it. What showed me is that I actually went 6 hours after waking up to taking a nap, and this easier slipping into the lucid state after getting some sleep, which I will mention shortly, still occurred, which combined with past experiences shows me that my mind, whether or not it is like this to this degree with other people, is able to maintain this state where it is receptive to the lucid dreaming state for an extended period of time. The idea is that I will sleep multiple, perhaps 3 as a baseline, times per day, in shorter intervals, as opposed to one long block of sleep each night. The main purpose behind the experiment is this. When you sleep some, then wake up, then go back to sleep, your odds of lucid dreaming skyrocket. I'm basically at a point where I can lucid dream whenever I want in that situation, if I have the intention. Given this sleep schedule, then, I could be in a state of perpetual lucid dreaming. Every time I sleep, I could lucid dream.

Expanding on this benefit, I actually developed a technique a while back where I could consciously enter a dream, meaning lay down to go to sleep and maintain awareness until I was in a dream, and then proceed with my lucid dream. This technique is largely dependent on having gotten some sleep prior to attempting it. If I stick to this sleep schedule, and resume working on my technique, I could actually consciously enter a lucid dream every single time I sleep. This means that I would never actually lose consciousness, if I so chose. As I continued to dream like this, my awareness of my dreams would continuously improve, and my 'dream time' would continue to expand. Each moment of dreaming is far larger than the corresponding perception of time in our waking lives. Typically we only remember very little of our dreaming, and we falsely correspond this dream time to waking time, and think we dreamt for that long. In actuality, we are remembering a tiny fraction of our dreams. This means that, if successful, I could potentially lucid dream for incredible amounts of 'time,' and continuously improve my abilities at making that experience go how I want.

There are a couple further benefits, one seems clear to me, and one is somewhat theoretical and vague. The clear one is that through having this continual experience of lucid dreaming, I would be able to increase a sense of 'detached joy' in my waking life, making me more free and joyous. It would also continuously improve my sense of seeing reality as being essentially no different than dreaming, which is a somewhat long-standing 'belief' of mine that grows the more I lucid dream. If my theories in this regard are correct, this change in perception could lead to a continuous improvement to my level of 'control' over reality. There is also a theoretical benefit, not necessarily tested scientifically yet but that makes sense, and as a side note I believe Leonardo Da Vinci may be testament to. Perhaps the main benefit of sleeping is dreaming. We cannot go without dreaming, or we go insane. Despite this, we only dream perhaps half of the time we sleep. With my sleep schedule, I would dream the entire time I slept. This would be at least doubling the amount of dreams I have. Theoretically, it makes sense that this could result in some unforeseeable raising in the abilities of my consciousness. If not dreaming makes you crazy, more dreaming probably raises your levels of consciousness. Beyond this, my dreams would be lucid, which I imagine has even more benefits for your consciousness.
edit on 19-5-2012 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 19 2012 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


I understand you man,i mean,but then again,wouldnt Astral projection and lucid dreaming have amajor connection due to the events that take place?

I meditate frequently and find that i place myself in another place,is meditation basically setting yourself to sleep and lucid dreaming the slow way?

If so,why can you do this?because if im correct,doesnt time slow down when you sleep?or speed up,i cant remember,but when you dream,you feel like you can stand over the day your about to have create what youd like to happen or which way you would like it to go.

Ill say i was meditating the other night,cross legged on my bed,im a standard burger king worker trying to make it in places with talents,so dont expect an albert einstein out of me,but i will say im rather wise,and well as i was hitting a certain 'point' my whole body went numb then my body fell to the side,or so i thought,i opened my eyes and my body was still sitting in the same position..and no,i wasnt sleeping -_-

Fascinating really

edit on 19-5-2012 by Winged-Sphinx because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 08:10 PM
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I constantly have lucid dreams. As the OP suggests, the key is to go to sleep multiple times. I have an almost total control of my dreams and happily remember them when Im awake. In fact, it is as if I have a second life or reality when I dream. But, as far as having more control over my reality when I wake, I feel that I do not. For me, they are two completly different worlds. Black or white, in one world the laws of physics do not apply to me anymore, etc...

The only advantage I can see is that I can train for particular situations in my dreams, where I would respond one way to an event and if I do not apreciate the outcome I created, I can kinda rewind it and respond differently untill I get my desired outcome. Then when im awake, it is as if I pretrained my brain to respond instinctivly in the real life situation the way I practiced it in my dreams..

Now, as I read my post once more, I realise that the OP is also right about having more control over my awake moments. lol, since I can pretrain my instinctive rsponses.

Sorry for the confusion, I hope everyone understands.



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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I would give you a flag, but I dont know how



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 08:23 PM
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OP what your describing has been practiced for some time, It's called the "Uber Man Sleep Cycle" and relies on regular 30 minute naps to induce intense REM (rapid eye movement) rebound cycles where you fall almost instantly into REM sleep and experience incredibly vivid drams then wake easily and refreshed half an hour later.
Many people use this to increase productivity, with the dreams being considered a side effect, as you spend far less time sleeping than you would normally and as such have much more time for work or play.
I have a fair amount of experience with the practice and lucid dreaming techniques and would be glad to help you out.
If you decide to try it be aware that initially adapting to the cycle can be very challenging for several weeks before your body adjusts and that once you become used to it missing one or more of your scheduled naps can have negative effects of the same magnitude as missing a day or two of normal sleep. You must be disciplined with your naps and determined to succeed as a sustained effort at establishing the cycle that ultimately fails can be very disruptive to your bodies natural processes and rhythms. It's also necessary to lead a lifestyle that allows you to sleep for half an hour every few hours so full time jobs can present a problem.
If you can't work around this pattern something else commonly practiced that historical evidence suggests used to be far more common place is to wake very early in the morning and get up for an hour or two to read a book or partake in some other gentle recreational activity or even sex before going back to bed for a few hours (1-4).
Some experts believe this is far more natural than a single long, uninterrupted sleep period.
I hope you find this information usefull.
edit on 19-5-2012 by Arkady because: (no reason given)


edit on 19-5-2012 by Arkady because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 08:30 PM
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I practiced this method a while back, seems to work.

And your correct about the reality loosing its realness.

I got to the point where this just felt like a game and the real world was when i was asleep!



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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Here's another exercise that also produces very interesting results! It is based around the transition from deep sleep to waking state.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 10:03 PM
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In the past, I had one particular period where I was constantly having lucid dreams, but they were more than lucid dreams as well. I actually had some very insane experiences during this time, but to briefly sum it up it was as if my dreams were being occupied by very intelligent beings who were trying to teach me. In some of my dreams, I entered into their reality I suppose, and had various amazing experiences. A constant theme was that they were trying to teach me how reality could be essentially like a dream. How I could take the principles of lucid dreaming and turn that into my 'real life.' In my dreams, one of the main messages they constantly gave me was that I could do ANYTHING that I wanted, and that there were no restrictions whatsoever. They basically said I should use that time to do absolutely anything that seemed enjoyable to me, because I needed to realize that there were no restrictions in this space.

It was like they were preparing me for something that was coming in the 'real world,' by letting me experience it a. of time in my dreams. A world in which I could have anything that I wanted, and everyone in my reality wanted exactly the same thing. During this time, it was DEFINITELY like my dreams and reality were merging...more and more throughout this period the distinctions blurred. This eventually 'stopped,' though, but some aspects of it have been returning again in my recent dreams.
edit on 19-5-2012 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 10:25 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 

I find that if you suggest to yourself that you are going to have a Lucid dream, when relaxing in preparation for sleep. There seems to be some part in your Psych that responds to the suggestion, and the dreaming isnt random.In fact it gets really interesting, but the suggestion must be fairly precise.
I guess its the same thing as telling youself that you have to do a certain thing at a certain time in waking life, suddenly you remember to do it when the time is right, having not had to think of it every minute of the day.



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 10:39 PM
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Although I do not yet totally believe, I have always wondered if lucid dreaming could benefit in one's attempt to manifest their own reality, little by little. The law of attraction, as it is called, seemed logical to me just from everyday experiences I have had personally, and have seen with others' behaviors, but there was always something nagging at me as to why it wouldn't work. Or couldn't work.

I also believe that physics can support these ideas, although mainstream science has yet to catch up with the theories and the math, or rather they haven't put two and two together yet. I believe in "action at a distance" in where particles do not have to be next to each other to affect one another. One can have no physical connection to another particle, yet they are still able to trigger action within one another. In this way, thoughts may be able to manipulate reality.

There would have to be more than just this mechanism, or there would have to be more advanced parts of this same mechanism, to explain how this manifestation would occur, but I think it does or can occur nonetheless. The reason I think that lucid dreaming may make it easier, as you suggest in this thread, is because you are to some extent harnessing subconscious parts of the human mind, as well as conscious parts, and this is done to a much higher degree than is possible for most while fully awake.

That pretty much sums it up, although in a pretty simple way, lol. I just thought I would mention this because it seemed to be something you were interested in, and since we basically are in agreement on the possibility of manifesting reality through lucid dreaming, I though it would be a good idea to validate your ideas...I think they are feasible. Personally, I cannot lucid dream well at all, so attempting to develop a method of manifesting a slightly better reality via experiment is as of now out of the question.

I would really love it if you could attempt an experiment while lucid dreaming that focuses on improving or manifesting something on a very specific level. I assume that in the most advanced stages, physical matter could be manifested, but I doubt anyone on earth has the understanding and ability to do as much. But, generating thoughts, feelings, emotions, ideas, etc., should be within the reach of just about anyone who can lucid dream as well clearly lay out their ideas while dreaming. It seems that one would have to develop the skills to maintain both conscious and subconscious concentration, or "centering" or "combining" the two, to successfully manifest parts of their own reality.

This is just a really cool subject, and I like your ideas...I like mine too, lol, and hopefully something will come out of this. If you like my other ideas, you are more than welcome to send me a message if there is anything you want to discuss about this theory. Thanks, and have a great day.



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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I read " Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming " by Stephen LaBerge from cover to cover about twenty times when I was in high school. It took me 8 years to have a lucid dream but I wasn't very devoted. That was the best dreaming book I could find I have about ten. It says to place a reminder or a sign in your room before going to sleep. It also stressed reality testing by looking at your watch and if time is going forward or you're not in a dream you're watch will work. It also said when you notice things during the day ( ex. a red shirt ) do the reality test so you can wake up and become self aware in a dream or train yourself.

It talks or writes about falling asleep consciously and entering a dream, keeping a dream journal for recall and not moving your body when you wake up so you can rewind and remember the dream. You seem very knowledgeable about the subject already, hope this helps. In the book he talks about waking up in naps to help your chances of becoming lucid.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 02:20 AM
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reply to post by anonentity
 

I'm coming to the conclusion that we have two states of concousness, ie. sleeping and awake.The dream environment is so detailed and complex that it almost seems to be another objective reality.Depending on the degree of lucidity.Or pheraps are we piggybacking on another persons conciousness.Either way it makes for an interesting field of study.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 04:57 AM
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Originally posted by anonentity
reply to post by anonentity
 

I'm coming to the conclusion that we have two states of concousness, ie. sleeping and awake.


dun dun dun! no s*** sherlock!

I'm really sorry, I had to do it.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 04:57 AM
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Originally posted by anonentity
reply to post by anonentity
 

I'm coming to the conclusion that we have two states of concousness, ie. sleeping and awake.


dun dun dun! no s*** sherlock!

I'm really sorry, I had to do it.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 12:45 PM
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I've done this before and had the ability to control my dreams or have several ones at a time by slightly waking up and thinking about a certian subject, like one time I was thinking about the simpsons and I like created a whole episode it was crazy and funny looking back.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by Arkady
[mor
True Watson.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 05:49 PM
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I wonder if the effects of stimulant class oneirogens like Artimisia vulgaris or Calea zacatechichi might be potentiated by a practice that forces intense REM rebound like this. For that matter I wonder how non stimulant oneirogens like Silene capensis might be influenced by it. Somebody should find out.



posted on May, 20 2012 @ 06:07 PM
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reply to post by Arkady
 

One shouldn't really need stimulants...but there are a list of commonly used ones in the vaults at "Earth clinic".



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