Oh Great Tuna comes from Japan??? OMG

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posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:13 PM
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Okay get this. I am eating StarKist Tuna right now with a little Vegenaise

I asked my wife where does this tuna come from? She read the label and said "Pittsburgh"


I said no that is where it was distributed...

Then I saw the "Product of Thailand" on the upc.

I went to Starkist's web site and found this unappetizing response:

Where is your tuna caught / is your tuna farm-raised?
All of StarKist’s tuna is wild-caught. The majority of the tuna StarKist obtains is from the Pacific Ocean and the Western Atlantic fisheries. We do not use farm-raised tuna.

link: www.starkist.com...

So then I found on Wiki:

The Australian government alleged in 2006 that Japan had illegally overfished southern bluefin by taking 12,000 to 20,000 tonnes per year instead of the their agreed 6,000 tonnes; the value of such overfishing would be as much as USD $2 billion.[38] Such overfishing has severely damaged bluefin stocks.[39] According to the WWF, "Japan's huge appetite for tuna will take the most sought-after stocks to the brink of commercial extinction unless fisheries agree on more rigid quotas".[40]

link: en.wikipedia.org...

So what the heck are we eating now? Don't tell me this stuff is free of Japan's nuclear waste.




posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:14 PM
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Japan has a huge hand in the fishing industry, I don't doubt that they are all back to work as normal.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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Albacore tuna 'toro' is gaining rising popularity at sushi restaurant chains in Japan
An article in Japan’s Minato Shimbun on Nov.10, 2009 and referenced in Seafood.com later in the week discusses a trend towards more albacore on Japanese sushi menus. The loins of tuna, often used in canning in the Americas and Europe, represent great value with very little loss for sushi bars and restaurants.

Albacore is also a popular menu item in some US Japanese restaurants. In Portland, eco-conscious Bamboo Sushi is one of the many Japanese restaurants featuring local, troll-caught albacore on the menu.

Read the full article that appeared in SeafoodNews.com below

SEAFOOD.COM NEWS [Japan Report] - November 12, 2009 - 'The albacore tuna is now valued as a material at revolving sushi restaurant chains for its good fat quality and relatively lower prices compared with other sashimi (raw) tuna commodities,' says an official of Tohto Suisan Co., a major seafood wholesaler at Tokyo's Tsukiji Fish Market.
'In recent years, its fatty part, dubbed 'bintoro' in Japanese, is becoming increasingly popular,' he added.

Basically, albacore has been known in Japan as one of red fish meat materials, along with bigeye and yellowfin tunas. The color of its meat is rather light pinkish.

Overseas, the species is widely used as material for canned tuna.

According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, the world's total catch in the 1950s stood at around 100,000 tons, of which Japan and Spain accounted for more than half. Since around the 1970s, however, its demand as canned tuna materials increased, with catch doubling to around 200,000 tons since 1980.

Its fishing grounds are found extensively in the Pacific, Atlantic and the Indian Ocean. Grounds around Japan also range from the area off eastern Sanriku, Shiogama and Kesennuma, northern Japan, to Choshi and Wakayama in central and western Japan, with both longline and purse-seine catches taking place from one area to another almost throughout the year.

Among fishermen the fish is called 'dragonfly' because it has long pectoral fins.

The central size currently distributed in the Japanese market is seven kilogram per fish. The Tohto Suisan official explained that mostly 9/15 lb (4-6.8 kg) size are imported from the United States and Canada.

Its frozen loin enjoys strong demand from revolving sushi restaurants and pub chains because it is handy to use with a very low loss rate.

Albacore processing plants, where bloody muscles are removed and loins are produced, are concentrated in Yaizu and Shimizu, Shizuoka Prefecture, west of Tokyo.

(Summarized from the Minato Shimbun, Nov.10, 2009)

link:wildalbacore.blogspot.com...



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by samlf3rd
 


Try some experiments.. Does it glow in the dark? Feed it to a bug...does it mutate?

If you leave it in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks, will it grow legs?



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


That would be cool. I would call it Steven.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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dont worry bro, the mercury will get you sooner than the Cesium.



seriously though seafood will be palatable longer then land based foods because the ocean and water itself, is a good radiation shield.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by samlf3rd
So what the heck are we eating now? Don't tell me this stuff is free of Japan's nuclear waste.


Don't worry, 90% of what we put in our bodies has worse crap in it than a little radiation. The fact that we can eat all the junk offerings in this world and live to tell about it is a testament to the resilience of the human body



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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I don't know about you guys, but if I don't have 100% conclusive proof of where seafood comes from, I'm not eating it anymore. You can bet your bottom dollar a lot of cheap packages seafood like tuna, fish stick, frozen fish filets, will come from the irradiated waters of the western Pacific near Japan, thanks to Fukushima. At rock bottom prices. Just say no. Hell no, I won't glow!

Unfortunately, that also include Alaskan seafood and western Canadian seafood. Sucks, because naturally caught salmon is much healthier than farm raised Atlantic salmon, but I'll take a little heavy metals in my seafood over radiation any day.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 

They got me again! No the mercury... I just want some clean unpolluted food. How can I find it?



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by samlf3rd
 





Okay get this. I am eating StarKist Tuna right now with a little Vegenaise


Yeah, I don't get it.
Isn't that a bit of a contradiction or is it just that you prefer Vegenaise over mayo?

Back on topic, though...

There's hardly anything left in this world that's safe. The food and water have been messed with and now our air is going to kill us. I've stopped worrying because the stress and worry of thinking about things like this will probably kill me faster.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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I swear, if we think about our food too much, we would all stop eating completely!
Seriously......if you look at ANY of the food we eat (unless we grow or raise it ourselves), there WILL be something bad you will find out about it. That's a fact. Look up anything...beef, chicken....anything.....and you will be losing your appitite rapidly. Food research is an EXCELLENT weight loss program.....



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 


ocean and water itself, is a good radiation shield.
false,,


HEAVY-WATER
is a good shield.true.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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Doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that tuna comes from the pacific near Japan. I have not eaten any SInce I expelled my cans about two weeks after the disaster, and will NOT touch seafood.

Either it comes from the pacific(Fukishima radiation) or the gulf (BP, corexit). Either way, don't eat seafood.....


edit on 18-5-2012 by amongus because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:16 PM
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the tuna found in cans is, usually, albacore or long fin tuna and, I believe, one of the canned tuna makers actually has "fancy albacore" on the tin.

we hauled in a few hundred pounds of long fin (and one big yellow fin) a while back and the yellow was eaten either on the ride back (sushi, still kicking, literally) or over the next day or two, in steak form. seared.

the long fine was grilled, cooked all the way thru and then turned into white meat tuna salad. it was awesome.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by amongus
Doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that tuna comes from the pacific near Japan.


nor does it take a fisherman to tell you tuna can be caught in the atlantic, right along the coast of the US, when the water temps are favorable. Tuna run north and then head back south, along the Eastern coast of the US, in the gulf stream, throughout the late summer and early fall. I have, in the past, caught small blue fin tuna a mile or so from the beach with the bigger tuna being hauled in around 50 to 100 miles off shore, or farther of course.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:31 PM
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Man it's a misnomer to say that all the tuna is caught around japan.

I live in Los Angeles. A lot of our tuna comes from the same place as it has for decades. The sea of Cortez. about 100 miles off of mexico a hair south of san diego. Nothing wrong with those fish. I go out every year on a overnighter to fish for Blue fin and Yellow Tail. Nothing wrong with those fish.

Waters almost warm enough to catch them off of Los Angles. Some are already getting them by catalina island. I'm stoked. in about a month or so I be fishin'!
edit on 18-5-2012 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by Crakeur

Originally posted by amongus
Doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that tuna comes from the pacific near Japan.


nor does it take a fisherman to tell you tuna can be caught in the atlantic, right along the coast of the US, when the water temps are favorable. Tuna run north and then head back south, along the Eastern coast of the US, in the gulf stream, throughout the late summer and early fall. I have, in the past, caught small blue fin tuna a mile or so from the beach with the bigger tuna being hauled in around 50 to 100 miles off shore, or farther of course.


Starkest tuna is mostly caught in the pacific.



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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The safer bet is to go with "Bumble Bee" tuna since their tuna is caught all over the globe. Could be Japan, but could be the other side of the world. It's like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!



Tuna is a highly migratory species that is found in all major oceans of the world. Bumble Bee sources globally, so our tuna can come from any of the oceans as well. While our tuna comes from all oceans, as a participant in International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) we are capable of tracing our tuna products from capture to plate including the name and flag of fishing vessels, fish species, ocean of capture corresponding to tuna Regional Fisheries Management Organization area, fishing trip dates, fishing gear employed, date the company took ownership of the fish and each species by weight.


www.bumblebee.com...
edit on 18-5-2012 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2012 @ 04:47 PM
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My diet consists of cans of tuna fish and hard boiled eggs. 1/2 can of tuna + 1 hard boiled egg + 1 yogurt is a meal for me, actually.

Maybe I will develop superpowers. Or cancer (again).

I'll keep you informed.



posted on May, 19 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 


ocean and water itself, is a good radiation shield.
false,,


HEAVY-WATER
is a good shield.true.


true indeed Bob, but ocean water is a good shield compared to air.





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