It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Kodak Facility in New York state housed Underground Nuclear Reactor

page: 2
18
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 16 2012 @ 07:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by BMorris
If you bother to read the original source, it wasn't a reactor, it was a neutron source for Kodak's research in to neutron imaging, and other projects.

The quantity of Uranium it housed was too small to produce power or go critical.

Please stop with the anti-radiation fearmongering.


Perfectly said.


I have been inside Kodak Park quite a few times, watched it deteriorate and is sad to see from what it was. They have there own fire department and know a fire fighter that works there if I see him I have to ask if he is/was trained for any nuclear or radiation type of accident.
edit on 16-5-2012 by Laxpla because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-5-2012 by Laxpla because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 16 2012 @ 07:54 PM
link   
www.amateurphotographer.co.uk...



The fridge-sized reactor contained three-and-a-half pounds of ‘highly-enriched' uranium, reported the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.

The reactor was decommissioned in 2006, but the uranium wasn't removed until November 2007, according to the paper. This was five months after Kodak used explosives to trigger demolition of two buildings by controlled ‘implosion', according to an AP article published in July 2007.

The firm scrapped Building 23 and Building 9 on Lake Avenue, Rochester, saying they were no longer needed after the move to digital imaging.

The first of the explosions was watched by up to 3,000 people (see picture above).

The reactor was located below basement level in Building 82 along Lake Avenue, according to the Democrat and Chronicle, which learned of its existence when a Kodak employee happened to mention it to a reporter.

At the time, it was reported that Kodak had demolished more than 80 buildings on the site over the previous decade.





Commenting on the demolition, the contractor said at the time: ‘Bianchi will ignite over 350 pounds of explosives using stick dynamite and linear-shaped charges, similar to those used by NASA for severing fuel tanks on the space shuttle.


They blew up the building above this thing with 350 pounds of explosives while the highly-enriched uranium was still in it and let up to 3,000 people watch with out telling them about the dangers.



edit on 16-5-2012 by JBA2848 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 07:57 PM
link   
i remember a you tube video of teslas tower being on a kodak site you could still see the base in it .dont know if this storys true but if you go near any jewish embassy in the world a guiger counter will go haywire makes you wonder



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 08:25 PM
link   
No wonder Americans have the highest cancer rate in the world.... just sayin



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 08:46 PM
link   
reply to post by JBA2848
 


Where does it say the building it was housed in? I'd think they would state that clearly if true. I think they are talking about other buildings located at that site.



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 08:55 PM
link   
University of Texas operates a 1.1 Megawatt TRIGA nuclear reactor at the JJ Pickle Research Center in North Austin....not many people know about this and to be honest I'm not sure what they use it for or if it could be a threat to anyone....just thought I would add my 2 cents.
edit on 16-5-2012 by Smitty5150 because: (no reason given)


I just WIki'd TRIGA...here's what it says: TRIGA is a pool-type reactor that can be installed without a containment building, and is designed for use by scientific institutions and universities for purposes such as undergraduate and graduate education, private commercial research, non-destructive testing and isotope production.

The TRIGA reactor uses uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH) fuel, which has a large, prompt negative thermal coefficient of reactivity, meaning that as the temperature of the core increases, the reactivity rapidly decreases. It is thus highly unlikely, though not impossible for a nuclear meltdown to occur. TRIGA was originally designed to be fueled with highly enriched uranium, but in 1978 the US Department of Energy launched its Reduced Enrichment for Research Test Reactors program, which promoted reactor conversion to low-enriched uranium fuel.[1]

So it's "highly unlikely" for a nuclear meltdown.
edit on 16-5-2012 by Smitty5150 because: Researched TRIGA



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 09:10 PM
link   
reply to post by JBA2848
 


I'm pretty sure uilding 82 was not one that was demolished. Kodak is huge you have to remember, they had there own train tracks. The reactor was dismantled in 2006. Demolition did not start till 2007.

Kodak went down because everything went digital.



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 09:51 PM
link   
Add Texas A&M to the reactor list.


There are two nuclear research reactors that serve the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center. The older of the two is the AGN-201M model, a low-power teaching reactor. The newer reactor, the TRIGA Mark I, is focused strongly towards research.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 10:23 PM
link   






Kodak Y12 plant for producing Uranium 235.




Dr. Robert J. Schrader is a chemical engineer with Bachelors and Masters degrees from Purdue University and a Doctorate from MIT. At MIT he held the Eastman Kodak fellowship. In February, 1943, several months before receiving his Doctorate, he was asked by Eastman Kodak to work at a new, war time project in Oak Ridge, TN. Dr. Schrader represented Eastman Kodak in work with Stone & Webster Engineering and Construction Co. on the design and construction of the “Y-12 Area” chemical plants, and then was responsible for their operation. These plants produced Uranium tetrachloride feedstock for the Alpha Cyclotrons and recovered salvage from the Beta Cyclotrons. At the end of WW-II he had been promoted to Superintendent of the Y-12 Chemical Engineering Dept. After WW-II Dr. Schrader continued to work for Kodak in a number of positions in Kingsport, TN and in Longview, TX. Dr. Schrader retired from Eastman Kodak Co. in 1983 as Vice President and Works Manager of Texas Eastman Co. and President of Caddo Construction Co., a Kodak subsidiary.


www.mphpa.org...

Seems Eastman Kodak was part of the Manhattan Project. Did they do part of this work at there headquarters in New York? That would explain why they created Kodak Air Resources Evaluation System 2000 (KARES 2000).

proceedings.esri.com...

Maybe theres more to this story then they are telling us.
edit on 16-5-2012 by JBA2848 because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-5-2012 by JBA2848 because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
18
<< 1   >>

log in

join