Vale Don Ritchie: the angel of the gap

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posted on May, 15 2012 @ 06:20 AM
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Vale Don Ritchie: the angel of the gap


www.abc.net.au

Don Ritchie, the man dubbed "the angel of the gap" has passed away, at the age of 85. He passed away peacefully and was surrounded by friends and family. Mr Ritchie lived near The Gap at Watson's Bay for over five decades and in that time he talked at least 160 people out of committing suicide.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 15 2012 @ 06:20 AM
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A true australian hero has died. Don Ritchie lived opposite the sydney headland which has been a popular suicide spot for decades. The amount of lives he has saved just by talking to people and taking them into his own house for a cup of tea with his wife is extraordinary.

3.bp.blogspot.com...



www.abc.net.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 06:32 AM
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We definitely need more folks like this Vale Don Ritchie character; he was a fine human-being as far as I can tell.



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 06:49 AM
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reply to post by bellagirl
 


It's an amazing story about an amazing human being.


abc.net.au

"Smile. Be friendly and say can I help you in some way.


Not so hard to do - and yet saved so many people in need.

R.I.P Don Ritchie.



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 07:03 AM
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reply to post by bellagirl
 


"At the time, Mr Ritchie said, "Never be afraid to speak to those who you feel are in need. Always remember the power of the simple smile, a helping hand, a listening ear and a kind word."

It's easy to forget in the hectic bustle of daily life. Mr. Ritchie remembered.

There are people who believe there are no consequences to suicide. I think there are situations where suicide is an option, such as when someone is dying in agony and there is no reasonable hope left.

But generally speaking, I don't think suicide is a good thing. Especially when one is still young -- a waste of a perfectly healthy body. The effect of suicide on the surviving relatives can be devastating, etc.

And death of the physical body is NOT the end.

Mr. Ritchie did good.



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 07:31 AM
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i heard a lovely interview with his daughter today. she was saying how when she was young and going to school, she would often get up in the morning and there would be a stranger sitting at the table with her parents. her parents would say "this is ......., our new friend". it was someone who in the early hours of the morning had gone to take their life and he had coaxed them into his house with the offer of a cup of tea and a ear to listen and a shoulder to cry on.

jeez...its not often someone like this comes along.

p.s......he was the person who fought to have a phone put at the gap with a direct line to a suicide prevention centre.



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 02:23 PM
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I'v just been reading about this, this guy is a legend.


He told his daughter an offer of help "was all that was often needed to turn people around, and he would say not to underestimate the power of a kind word and a smile," she told The Sydney Morning Herald.

Source

The world has lost a very special person, R.I.P Don
edit on 15-5-2012 by n00bUK because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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Even though I don't have a beer right now, or a cup of tea, I'll raise -

Oh wait. I have a hat on. *takes hat off* I take my hat off to this guy. Hell yes, we need more like him.

"Last of a dying breed" sound like a pretty good sentiment for this occasion. Hopefully, it'll make a comeback.

Like the 60's. Only better.





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