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Tsunami Debris Hitting N. American shores-The thread

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posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 06:43 PM
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Originally posted by stanguilles7

Originally posted by hp1229
Eventually the fishing boats/ships will make plastic runs for collecting plastics for the recycling industry


Perhaps. But it will take decades for the price to be at a place where its profitable for ships to scavenge plastic at a profit.


Greetings:

As our friend, esteemed member this_is_who_we_are, would say:

Really?


Are we going to wait until these debris

islands invade the Hawaiian Islands and

then the West Coast of North America all

the way from San Diego to Vancouver, B.C.?


Or, are there any ideas to meet this challenge on the high seas before possible irreparable damage is done to the fragile eco-culture that now flourishes on the West Coast of America?

We thinks it was perhaps a few pages back where we suggested a floating materials recycling facility (MRF). Replace the dump truck with a few purpose-fitted tugboats (that towed the MRF-on-a-barge to American Resource Island One), pull up alongside the resource debris island, and go to work.



Here's a MRF for the recycling of domestic waste.

Materials recovery facility - Wikipedia


Or something like this:


The Materials Recovery Facility uses single stream technology to automatically sort the paper, plastic, cans and glass collected at curbside in San José.




1. As incoming material moves along a conveyer belt, workers pull out large items, cardboard and plastic bags and toss them into bins. Unusable trash is thrown away.

2. The recyclables move into a double-deck screening machine that separates newspapers, mixed paper and containers into separate streams. Material bounces over rows of square wheels spinning 1,000 times per minute. Blasts of air dislodge cans and bottles from newspapers. Gaps between rollers allow smaller items to fall onto conveyer belts.

3. Workers again pull out any trash and discard it.

4. Next is the trommel-mag - a large, rotating tube with small holes in the sides and an electromagnet at one end. Small items such as bottle caps fall through holes. The electromagnet snags tin cans. Then it's on to the air classifier, where a powerful fan blows lightweight aluminum and plastic onto one conveyer, and heavier glass falls onto another. Workers sort glass and plastics.

5. An electromagnetic device diverts aluminum cans into a storage bin.


Garbage & Recycling - Materials Recovery Facility (MRF

Or even just a few balers for plastic and process the bales back on the mainland.







Let's suppose you can get $0.30/Lbs for Scrap Plastic.

A 10” cylinder baler would produce at the minimum 1,400 lb. bales of LDPE @ $420/bale; 1,000 bales =

$420,000.





and probably 1,000+ lbs. bales of HDPE; @ $300/bale; 1,000 bales =


$300,000.


2,000 mixed bales = approximately


$750,000.


One would be willing to bet that there are some very big players thinking about this with that kind of money on the table.


Wonder what the legal aspect of a venture of this type would be.

Can one just "claim" all or part of a debris island?

Do the laws of the high seas apply and it can be claimed as salvage?

Can one even find it?







How big is your transport ship?




How many bales fit in a container?


Something... anything pro-active.


How about a team of like-minded individuals to look into this as an opportunity to provide a much-needed service that should actually be more than self-sustaining?

After all, we start with (free) resources being delivered closer to our shores everyday.

By natural selection, won’t these islands will have “organized” themselves into like-masses, if you will?

Please add your ideas here in this thread so that others may see the light and help to implement [color=Chartreuse]THE PLAN TO SAVE AMERICA FROM FUKUSHIMA (again).






Peace Love Light
tfw
[align=center][color=magenta]Liberty & Equality or Revolution[/align]




posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 06:51 PM
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I live in AK and work in remote locations all along the Alaskan coast. I have seen quite a bit of debris in the Bering Sea, but in relatively normal amounts and I do not think any of it was Tsunami related. I have a friend on Kodiak Island and he has found some definite Tsunami debris, but not tons. On a different note, I was on St George Island doing some work for NOAA and there was a Environmental Scientist there at the same time to do some drinking water tests for the Native Tribal Health Group in the state. The local tribe asked him to bring a Geiger Counter to check some of the debris there. He found nothing above normal background levels.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by thorfourwinds
 


I think it's an interesting idea. And i think you're right, people are probably crunching the numbers. But i think the biggest mistake in your reasoning is to believe it will be a simple task collecting all the plastic. It's not an 'island'. It's a gyre, of sorts. And its not all collected in one place, its spread out in a very thin, in some places nearly microscopic layer. That would mean a LOT of effort into collecting, which likely would be very cost preventative. Not to mention the cost of producing the massive floating factory you describe.

The real 'plan' so far seems to be that the US and Canada will wait it out to see what happens, and hope for the best. If and when a lot shows up, they plan to possibly even ship it back out to sea to dump it. It's rarely profitable to think long term.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 10:18 PM
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Here is how Oregon is handling the trash that is washing up on our beaches.

Tsunami Debris Response


In response to what is becoming an unprecedented amount of marine debris in Oregon, SOLVE has taken a leading role with partners Surfrider Foundation, Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition, Oregon Sea Grant and Washed Ashore, in forming a plan for a coordinated response.



A network of 32 drop-off sites on the Oregon coast are now ready to receive beach debris washing ashore from the tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011. The drop-off sites are free and are a combination of state parks and independent recycling and transfer stations located in every county. Visitors and residents can call 211 (or 1-800-SAFENET) to report tsunami debris they see on the beach.


SOLVE

The debris seems to be spread out for now anyway. At least Oregon is not waiting around for help from the federal government. Many people are planning on picking up debris during their summer trips to the coast.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 10:31 PM
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Oregon is going to try to return personal property to Japan.


People should be especially mindful of items that might have sentimental value or personal significance to someone in Japan, officials said. When such items wash up, Oregon will work with the Japanese consulate to return them


Washing ton Post Article


I was not aware that there is a tsunami debris removal company in Oregon. We have not really had a tsunami since the 1960's, so this might be a new side business for this company.


Pacific Coast Tsunami Debris Cleanup

Alaska - BC - Washington - Oregon- California - Hawaii
Eliminate Tsunami Debris Right on the Coastline
No Drying Out - No Grinding - No Metal Parts Concerns No Trucking - No Landfill Tipping Fees
Most cost efficient and environmentally friendly method.


Air Burners Inc.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 10:27 AM
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This link: www.youthink.com... is to a thread on a diff site (obviously) about a floating dock that has washed up on a oregon beach. There's a couple pics as well. You don't have to join to see it.



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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barge off the coast of washington that they now cant find. Suspect its going south:



WESTPORT, Wash. -- Officials are monitoring a large piece of possible tsunami debris about 25 miles off Washington's coast near Westport.

Grays Harbor County Emergency Management Deputy Director Chuck Wallace tells KBKW that it appears to be a barge, about 25 by16 feet, that could have been torn away by the March 2011 tsunami in Japan.

He says the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been tracking the debris move along the coast for about a week. Officials don't when or where it might wash ashore.


www.sacbee.com...



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by PacificBlue



I was not aware that there is a tsunami debris removal company in Oregon. We have not really had a tsunami since the 1960's, so this might be a new side business for this company.


Pacific Coast Tsunami Debris Cleanup

Alaska - BC - Washington - Oregon- California - Hawaii
Eliminate Tsunami Debris Right on the Coastline
No Drying Out - No Grinding - No Metal Parts Concerns No Trucking - No Landfill Tipping Fees
Most cost efficient and environmentally friendly method.


Air Burners Inc.



Yeah, that's an interesting mobile incinerator they got there. Seems like overkill, but i suppose it could actually be very useful. i wonder what one of those things costs to manufacture?



posted on Jul, 27 2012 @ 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by stanguilles7

Yeah, that's an interesting mobile incinerator they got there. Seems like overkill, but i suppose it could actually be very useful. i wonder what one of those things costs to manufacture?


Most of the tsunami debris on the Oregon coast is pieces of wood. I also wondered if it was really necessary to burn it. Could it be just be placed somewhere far enough away from the coast, so that invasive marine life would not be an issue? I wonder what the cost of hauling it was vs. the cost of using an air burner.


NOAA makes $250,000 in grants available to states impacted by tsunami debris



July 17, 2012
Today, NOAA announced that $250,000 in grants has been made available through its marine debris program to five states impacted by debris from the March 2011 Japanese tsunami. Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Hawaii will receive up to $50,000 each to use toward marine debris removal efforts. The funds could be released as soon as the end of July


noaa.gov

This will not go very far towards cleanup, however, at least we are getting some help.

The dock that is still on the beach in Oregon, that was discussed previously, has not been removed. They keep moving up the removal date. It has become a tourist attraction and the merchants in Agate Beach, where it is located, said that they made as much revenue this year by July 4, as they would make in an entire summer. I heard a rumor that the businesses in Agate Beach are asking the state to leave it there until summer is over, but I can not be sure that is true. If true, I can't say that I blame them, as I was there, and Agate Beach was much more crowded than in the past.

At first, I thought it should be removed, but after some thought, it does not really look that bad, and we do not know what else might show up. It would have been better to wait, as $80,000 is a lot of money to spend on one item.



posted on Jul, 27 2012 @ 03:03 PM
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Does anyone want to go live off the grid? Just hitch a ride in those mobile homes!



posted on Jul, 27 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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Originally posted by PacificBlue

Originally posted by stanguilles7

Yeah, that's an interesting mobile incinerator they got there. Seems like overkill, but i suppose it could actually be very useful. i wonder what one of those things costs to manufacture?


Most of the tsunami debris on the Oregon coast is pieces of wood. I also wondered if it was really necessary to burn it. Could it be just be placed somewhere far enough away from the coast, so that invasive marine life would not be an issue? I wonder what the cost of hauling it was vs. the cost of using an air burner.


Yes, it comes across as more of a scam/cash grab than a viable need. But it's still an interesting piece of technology.

At the same time, if invasives really were a concern of large magnitude, then measures like this would be far more thorough than just sending it out to sea.

But i dont think the woody debris will be a real problem. Heck, they could just bonfire them.




The dock that is still on the beach in Oregon, that was discussed previously, has not been removed. They keep moving up the removal date. It has become a tourist attraction and the merchants in Agate Beach, where it is located, said that they made as much revenue this year by July 4, as they would make in an entire summer. I heard a rumor that the businesses in Agate Beach are asking the state to leave it there until summer is over, but I can not be sure that is true. If true, I can't say that I blame them, as I was there, and Agate Beach was much more crowded than in the past.

At first, I thought it should be removed, but after some thought, it does not really look that bad, and we do not know what else might show up. It would have been better to wait, as $80,000 is a lot of money to spend on one item.


I dont understand why they feel they need to move it. They already removed the species of concern. Seems like a great tourist attraction/place of interest.
edit on 27-7-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)






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