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Tsunami Debris Hitting N. American shores-The thread

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posted on May, 24 2012 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


U.S. Senator Mark Begich of Alaska suggested last week that NOAA provide $45 million.
ok lets see if your Thread is Worth,,

$45 million,,
going once,,,

do i hear $100,,,anyone,,$ up too a 100,,,

going twice,,,

congradulations ,,u now have a card at the table.


sorry meant chair,,
edit on 24-5-2012 by BobAthome because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 24 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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I'd much rather be the recipient of the debris than the recipient of the tsunami.

No death and destruction on the clean-up side of things... just money.



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by stanguilles7
 


U.S. Senator Mark Begich of Alaska suggested last week that NOAA provide $45 million.


Yes, just mentioned that in the post before your own.

Thanks for reading!

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by Zarniwoop
I'd much rather be the recipient of the debris than the recipient of the tsunami.

No death and destruction on the clean-up side of things... just money.



Well, not as pronounced, but there is a good chance there will be some destruction involved in the arrival of debris. Much of it is likely rather toxic, full of fuels and the like. Plus, some biologists are concerned with invasive species. Not to mention the million or so tons of plastics Styrofoam, etc, that will damage ecosystems on the west coast for years to come.



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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Chasing tsunami debris




A research team from California, meanwhile, is in the middle of a two-part debris chase in the northern Pacific Ocean. Their mission is to find out exactly what is out there so they can warn coastlines about what to expect in the coming years, said expedition leader Marcus Eriksen. “In the next year, year and a half, you’re going to begin to see an increase in the amount of debris washing up,” Eriksen said. "Much of the debris that’s subsurface is a little more than halfway across the ocean by now.” Some of this debris is a risk to coastal reefs and could pose a boating hazard. “You’re going to have boat hulls overturned or a car tire still on the rim. If a small sailboat hits one of these things, or a shipping container, it can cause some significant damage,” Eriksen said. The joint research venture comprises scientists from the Algalita Marine Research Institute and the 5 Gyres Institute.

The first leg from May 1-21 took the team from the Marshal Islands to Tokyo. The second leg from Tokyo back to Hawaii leaves June 1. It takes them into the area where most of the tsunami debris is predicted to be at this time. Researchers believe there is a giant blob of debris is below the surface just north of Midway Atoll halfway across the ocean and possibly thousands of kilometres in diameter.

“We’re going to sail right through the centre off that, skim the sea surface with our nets to see what comes up,” Eriksen said. During the first leg they found bottles, Styrofoam and broken milk crates. They expect to find mostly plastics during the second leg. “The wood is gone, metals have oxidized and are gone by now, they’ve sunk, what’s left is going to be plastics, the polyethylene and polypropylene, and anything that is trapping air,” said Eriksen.


www.cbc.ca...



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 



Plus, some biologists are concerned with invasive species


Politicians?



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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Anyone think the lady that got burned by the rocks in california was the result of fukshima debris? I know the media said it was phosphorus, is phosphorus part of a nuclear reaction? Seems like something they would hide in plain sight.



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by Lord Jules
 


Pretty unlike for two main reasons. One, rocks would not likely float that far. And Two, debris has not reached that part of S. Cal, and is not likely to for a while, if ever.



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


here u go,,chair at the table remember,,so how much did they get for the cleanup?????



en.video.sympatico.ca... up


billionaire ,,wow.

u.s.-billionaire-lists-b.c.-island-hideaway-for-sale/1675571784001?sort=date&page=1

U.S. billionaire lists B.C. island hideaway for sale.
looky ,,looky,,spooky spooky,,



posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 

I dont understand your point.

Can you clarify?



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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This might be related:



Barrett-Lennard is also looking to gather stomach samples to see how tsunami debris affected the whale. “With all the debris floating in from Japan right now, all the plastic debris, phenomenal amounts of floating foam ... I’m very curious how much plastic debris these animals are accumulating in their stomach,” Barrett-Lennard said. Read it on Global News: Global BC | Fishing line that killed humpback whale in White Rock not from Canada, expert says


www.globaltvbc.com...



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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Here in the Northwest, we are hearing about tsunami debris every night on the local and regional news. I do not have any articles, but they mentioned a washer and dryer, another small dock, some type of large metal container, and various other things.

Last weekend, I was out at the coast, and many people had little souvenirs from Japan that they found, like water bottles and other small things.

What are they going to really do about the cleanup? Our state, Oregon, does not have enough money in the annual budget to remove the large dock that wound up on a beach in southern Oregon. I read that they are thinking of just making the dock a tourist attraction, and leaving it on the beach, so people can come and see it. That might be alright, but what about everything else?

The west coast of North America will be dealing with this problem for years, and I hope that our states and Canada can work together to come up with some sort of plan for waste removal. What a mess!



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by PacificBlue
 


Thanks for the update from your area. I found an article about that dock here



If this does truly get too big for the states to manage, i suspect the Fed will step in. That seems to be what most local and state reps are pushing for.



In Oregon, U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici held a meeting in Cannon Beach Friday to try to better coordinate a federal response to the crisis. Cannon Beach leaders announced Monday a plan to recruit volunteers so they don’t have to wait for other agencies to react.


Some Kayakers found the remains of what they suspect was a house



Three kayakers with the Ikkatsu Project wrote in a report this week that they found the remnants June 12 near the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula, about 120 miles (193 kilometers) west of Seattle. They discovered a lumber pile mixed in with driftwood and seaweed. Some of the lumber was stamped with a serial number they traced to a mill in Osaka - the Diawa Pallet Housou Co., the kayakers wrote.


Invasive species could ride tsunami debris to US shore


www.phillyburbs.com... ticle_6b6d5ca8-c31c-52b3-ad2c-3f78895cdbcb.html



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


Thanks for the reply, and the picture and information about the dock. I thought it was already mentioned here, or I would have included a link. I always (well almost always) read the thread before replying.


There have been many requests for volunteers from different organizations, and I think that is how a lot of this trash will be removed. People here love the outdoors, and will probably be happy to help out when they can. If I can get any good pictures, I will try to share them, but last time it was just water bottles, and junk, not very interesting stuff at all.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 12:07 AM
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Massive Debris En Route

Some interesting quotes:



Massive debris en route The concerns of locals are shared by Vancouver Aquarium CEO John Nightingale, who recently returned from Haida Gwaii, where he had surveyed a debris field from a boat off the coast. “Never before had we been out there and just stand on the deck of the boat and see identifiable floating pieces of plastic as far as the eye can see,” Nightingale said.

Haida administrators like John Disney are concerned that light debris that's been blown by the wind is only a hint of the mess ocean currents could bring in the coming months, perhaps as early as October.

“What we didn't realize ... until we started monitoring satellite imagery, is how big the debris field is that is coming. That's the heavy stuff that's affected by ocean currents, and that's just massive,” Disney



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 08:42 AM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by stanguilles7
 


here u go,,chair at the table remember,,so how much did they get for the cleanup?????



en.video.sympatico.ca... up


billionaire ,,wow.

u.s.-billionaire-lists-b.c.-island-hideaway-for-sale/1675571784001?sort=date&page=1

U.S. billionaire lists B.C. island hideaway for sale.
looky ,,looky,,spooky spooky,,



Interesting, now if he takes the proceeds and buys a nice 9,000 acre ranch in Paraguay what might that tell you? Seems like someone else bought one not too long ago,,,,,hmmm,,,,,,,



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 08:55 AM
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Originally posted by stanguilles7
reply to post by BobAthome
 

I don't understand your point.

Can you clarify?


Use your right hand to pick things up, and the geiger counter in your left hand to check them first.

Maybe our billionaire buddy expects more Fuku fun heading our way and due to the jetstream BC gets it's dose pretty quickly. There are any number of things that could still spiral out of control over there. I would not be surprised if a billionaire had some inside information and wanted to get something for it before it got too contaminated.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 02:39 PM
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Originally posted by KaiserSoze

Originally posted by stanguilles7
reply to post by BobAthome
 

I don't understand your point.

Can you clarify?


Use your right hand to pick things up, and the geiger counter in your left hand to check them first.


You make as much sense as Bob.


Maybe our billionaire buddy expects more Fuku fun heading our way and due to the jetstream BC gets it's dose pretty quickly. There are any number of things that could still spiral out of control over there. I would not be surprised if a billionaire had some inside information and wanted to get something for it before it got too contaminated.


Possibly. Except, of course, that island has changed hands a dozen times in the last 40 years, and this last owner only had it for a few years. SO the far more likely situation is, he bought an island and a few years later realized he never actually used it, just like the guy before him, and before him. Plus, it was used as a bomb factory in ww1, so if someone was concerned with a poisoned environ, they probably wouldnt have bought it n the first place.

Sorry to get context in the way of your blind speculation. Have fun talking to Bob in cryptic broken english.



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 01:12 AM
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It looks like they will be removing the dock from the beach in Oregon after all, but leaving part of it to build a memorial.

Seattle company to remove tsunami dock


A Seattle company will remove the 66-foot long dock that washed away in the 2011 Japan tsunami and drifted to the Oregon Coast earlier this month. The Vancouver, Washington branch of Ballard Diving and Salvage will dismantle the dock on shore and remove it for $84,155.

Since washing ashore on Agate Beach north of Newport, Oregon, the dock has become a tourist attraction. Some have suggested leaving it on the beach. The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department said portions of the dock will be used for a local memorial.


I am only speculating, but if it costs over $80,000 to remove one large object, the cost of the cleanup will be substantial. However, a lot of the trash will be small enough to be picked up and hauled away, so that is a good thing.

However, the worst problem might just be the invasive species that are coming with the debris. The dock had over 50 different organisms attached to it. Invasive species were already a problem before this happened. Also, it will much more difficult if not impossible to remove marine life.

Link


One of the major concerns with tsunami debris is its potential to bring invasive foreign animals and organisms to the West Coast. Early fears that debris would be radioactive have proven false, but scientists continue to identify potentially invasive organisms attached to the floating dock near Newport.



“The floating dock can be considered a wakeup call that conveniently arrived on the beach within five miles of a leading marine science center,” Jessica Miller, an OSU marine ecologist who was one of the first scientist to examine the organisms, said in a news release. “This provides us with a spectacular opportunity to understand the overall invasion process and the risks associated with tsunami debris fields to come.” According to the release, the Northern Pacific seastar, the Japanese shore crab and a species of brown algae came attached to the dock and have a high potential for successful invasion. Fifty other organisms have been identified on the dock.
edit on 24-6-2012 by PacificBlue because: add text



posted on Jun, 24 2012 @ 11:53 AM
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reply to post by PacificBlue
 


Wow. 80,000 dollars to remove something that doesnt need to be removed? Really? Seems like quite a waste. Why not just leave it there?

Looks like these companies are looking to make a good bit coin off this whole disaster cleanup:



Ballard Diving, along with others, is positioning itself for more contracts with West Coast states and local governments where debris washes up. Both Oregon and Washington have asked for federal help to pay for the cost of removing not only the tsunami debris, but even more items expected to wash up in coming months.


And now Washington State has announced they are setting aside $100,000 for clean up. Obviously that wont go very far, will it?



Washington state Gov. Chris Gregoire announced this week the state has set aside $100,000 for cleanup and could dip into a $700,000 emergency fund if needed.

Washington state is also seeking federal assistance.

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has set aside $600,000 for the cleanup so far, but the states of Oregon and Alaska, also affected by tsunami debris, have said more money will be needed.

Read more: www.vancouversun.com...
l


And, yeah, the amount of living invasive species floating over from japan is quite interesting as well. I notice they had to use a blowtorch to kill many of them off the dock.
edit on 24-6-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)






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