Tsunami Debris Hitting N. American shores-The thread

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posted on May, 13 2012 @ 10:50 AM
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As this is likely to be a major event, as the bulk of the debris begin to hit the west coast in the coming months and years, I thought it might be helpful to have a thread dedicated to info about the debris field, and the clean-up effort. Post data as it comes out here, if you desire.

Lots of reports the last few days as the debris from the Japanese tsunami are really beginning to collect along the Alaska and BC coast. More is expected to also begin to hit Washington and Oregon over the coming months and weeks, well into 2014, some 18 million tons of debris in all.

There are some noteworthy finds so far, including the shipping container holding a harley davidson, and the Japanese Fishing boat. But much of the debris now collecting is is just trash-thousands of fishing weights, bits of Styrofoam, plastic, etc.

The debris field will hit in waves over several years



"...the plume will reach the U.S. West Coast, dumping debris on Californian beaches and the beaches of British Columbia, Alaska and Baja California. The debris will then drift into the famous North Pacific garbage patch, where it will wander around and break into smaller and smaller pieces," they said.

"In five years, Hawaii shores can expect to see another barrage of debris that is stronger and longer lasting than the first one. Much of the debris leaving the North Pacific garbage patch ends up on Hawaii’s reefs and beaches."


Some are saying this will be the biggest disaster to hit the West coast of N America. 18 million tons of trash, much of it toxic, that will have to be cleaned up and disposed of. And much of this will be hitting areas of the continent that are relatively isolated. The Alaska and BC Coast and Washington islands will have to ship the trash out of their communities. Which will, obviously, cost a lot of money, and likely require a co-ordinates effort between nations.



Scientists at the University of Hawaii say a field of about 18 million tonnes of debris is slowly being carried by ocean currents toward North America. The field is estimated to be about 3,200 kilometres long and 1,600 kilometres wide (2000 mi by 1000 mi).


Will it be radioactive?

Experts (NOAA, for example) are telling us no, although evidence of testing appears to be rather minimal. But the trash most certainly will contain chemical debris, oils, paints, etc.

iprc.soest.hawaii.edu...

www.cbc.ca...

www.cbc.ca...

www.cbc.ca...

www.winnipegfreepress.com...



edit on 13-5-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)
edit on 13-5-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 13 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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Even if the timber washed over from Japan was of useful sizes, the sea salt would make it useless anyway, no win for anyone, this planet sure like to mess humans around, whenever in can, although I suppose a wood burning stove would have fuel for years to come?



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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marinedebris.noaa.gov...

Tracking Marine Debris from the Japanese Tsunami

oceanservice.noaa.gov...

www.env.gov.bc.ca...

Transport of marine debris from the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami to the west coast of Canada

www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca...



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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I have a question..

and the answer is probably simple, but,

why isn't this shiz going to the big plastic whirlpool thingy everybody is always complaining about

(the middle of the Pacific)

wut
edit on 13-5-2012 by rbnhd76 because: know reason



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 01:45 PM
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Originally posted by rbnhd76
I have a question..

and the answer is probably simple, but,

why isn't this shiz going to the big plastic whirlpool thingy everybody is always complaining about



GoodQuestion:



"In three years, the plume will reach the U.S. West Coast, dumping debris on Californian beaches and the beaches of British Columbia, Alaska and Baja California."In three years, the plume will reach the U.S. West Coast, dumping debris on Californian beaches and the beaches of British Columbia, Alaska and Baja California. The debris will then drift into the famous North Pacific garbage patch, where it will wander around and break into smaller and smaller pieces," they said.," they said.


www.cbc.ca...



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 02:07 PM
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I quoted a figure above saying 18 million estimated tons.

Sounds like that's the high end of the estimate.





Pallister states that since many federal and state agencies normally get involved in an environmental catastrophe, it will be important to plan logically in the days ahead, “Especially the agencies are loathe to say for certain this is tsunami trash, but there is no question.

We clean 17 monitoring sites every year and another 122 miles of coastline. We have a really good idea of what is coming in. What we’re seeing is magnitudes more. A tremendous amount more,” he said. He continued: “Then into the kinds of differences – cherry red fuel cans – kerosene canisters – we’ve never seen those before. All over the place – hundreds of them.”

Japan allows maritime floats consisting of Stryofoam, which is not used much by American mariners. The floats vary in size from 5-30-gallon size floats. “There are thousands of them when you look along the coast,” Pallister said. In normal times, GOAK would find maybe 20-30 of these floats. However, this year Pallister has seen more on one beach than he has seen in his entire life. “The thing that stands out to me is the amount of Styrofoam. Great big chunks – eight feet long to small broken up pieces. Urethane foam from walls that were destroyed. It’s an obscene mass. No way, in hell, that this is not tsunami debris,” he said.

Pallister also commented on the sinking of the Japanese vessel Ryou Un Maru, stating that this was a particularly unwise move by officials. He says: “That was so ill advised to sink that ship. There’s lots of fuels, Styrofoam, insulation, freezers, microwaves, all that plastic will pop to surface. It was stupid to sink it like that. It might take take 50 – 100 years, but eventually it will float to the surface.”

Read more: digitaljournal.com...


homertribune.com...



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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This may be a silly question, how come after the tsunami that hit Sumatra etc. this was not an issue? They had massive amounts of buildings etc washed away, yet we heard nothing about floating debris going anywhere. Where did it all go and how have the countries that it washed up on handled it?

Is all this publicity because the Japanese debris is headed toward us? Would there be as much concern if it were headed toward say Africa?
edit on 13-5-2012 by Iamschist because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by Iamschist
This may be a silly question, how come after the tsunami that hit Sumatra etc. this was not an issue? They had massive amounts of buildings etc washed away, yet we heard nothing about floating debris going anywhere. Where did it all go and how have the countries that it washed up on handled it?

Is all this publicity because the Japanese debris is headed toward us? Would there be as much concern if it were headed toward say Africa?
edit on 13-5-2012 by Iamschist because: (no reason given)


Well, the Japanese Tsunami was far larger than the Sumatra one, and the area of Japan that it struck was far more developed, so it is more than likely there is a far greater amount of debris. But, yes, it also makes sense that the N. American press is going to cover the issue more if it effects N america than if it effects an area in Indonesia or Africa.


The Great Sumatra Tsunami on 26 December 2004 generated large amounts of debris and waste throughout the affected coastal region in the Indian Ocean. In Banda Aceh—Indonesia, the tsunami flows were observed carrying a thick muddy sludge that mixed with all kinds of debris from the destroyed buildings, bridges and culverts, vehicles, fallen trees, and other flotsam. This waste and debris was mostly deposited inland, but traveled both onshore and offshore. Numerical dispersal modeling is carried out to simulate the transport of debris and waste produced by the tsunamis during the event. The model solves the Lagrangian form of the transport/dispersion equations using novel particle tracking techniques. Model results show that understanding the pathway and distribution of the suspended materials and flotsam caused by tsunamis is important for a proper hazards mitigation plan and waste management action, and to minimize serious long-term adverse environmental and natural resources consequences.


researchcommons.waikato.ac.nz...



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by pikestaff
Even if the timber washed over from Japan was of useful sizes, the sea salt would make it useless anyway, no win for anyone, this planet sure like to mess humans around, whenever in can, although I suppose a wood burning stove would have fuel for years to come?


I think the bigger concern is plastics, Styrofoam, etc.

not wood.

Maybe we could make a giant ball of stuff and catepault it back to Japan?



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 07:32 AM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


Look on the bright side. This will create a lot of "found art". Movies shot on the beaches will have interesting props to play with. Some yuppie will gather debris and sell it on fancy plaques with gold-etched writing commemorating/bemoaning the Earthquake. Children will find toys! Yay! And people that like garage sales will have a field day sorting through the debris for just the right item that others missed. I can't wait!



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 09:09 AM
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Eventually the fishing boats/ships will make plastic runs for collecting plastics for the recycling industry


The buildup is huge without the Tsunami. Garbage disposal and shipping accidents from around the world is the cause.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 01:29 PM
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Very interesting topic. Stars and flags OP!



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by hp1229
Eventually the fishing boats/ships will make plastic runs for collecting plastics for the recycling industry


Perhaps. But it will take decades for the price to be at a place where its profitable for ships to scavenge plastic at a profit.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 06:11 PM
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my guess is that wherever the garbage pile goes, so does fukashima.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by cloaked4u
my guess is that wherever the garbage pile goes, so does fukashima.


I thin that is more or less accurate, as well. Although it can be argued it dissipates more than, say, a plastic bottle or a fishing ship.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 08:27 PM
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trash from japan hits shores of alaska. What a huge mess, with pics on the news. here it is. youtu.be... wow. and this is only some of the stuff.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 08:45 PM
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Originally posted by cloaked4u
trash from japan hits shores of alaska. What a huge mess, with pics on the news. here it is. youtu.be... wow. and this is only some of the stuff.


Here you go:




posted on May, 15 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by stanguilles7

Originally posted by hp1229
Eventually the fishing boats/ships will make plastic runs for collecting plastics for the recycling industry


Perhaps. But it will take decades for the price to be at a place where its profitable for ships to scavenge plastic at a profit.

Unless until if its government sponsored effort?



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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Interesting article about scientists studying the tsunami debris.



Scientists want to know how the swirling vortex of currents contaminated with pollution is affecting the marine ecology.

There's been a relatively recent shift in perception where we've gone from looking at plastic as a litter problem to looking at plastic as a pollution problem when it's in the environment," Mr Sharp said.

"So we're really trying to gather data that will support that, to help us speed change in the way we use plastics, so we can stop it getting out there in the first place."

One of the key goals of the expedition is to measure the level of toxins in the floating plastics.


Australian to embark on tsunami debris mission

www.abc.net.au...



posted on May, 24 2012 @ 08:31 PM
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The cleansing project slated to start on Friday on Montague Island is expected to last a couple weeks, and organizers say it marks the first major project in Alaska to collect and dispose of debris from the tsunami

With more debris headed for the West Coast, questions about cleanup costs remain unanswered. Those expenses could be high in Alaska because of geographic and weather challenges.

U.S. Senator Mark Begich of Alaska suggested last week that NOAA provide $45 million as an initial outlay to fund what is expected to be a sustained and difficult beach cleanup.


www.reuters.com...

Toxic tsunami debris will flood Alaska shores Read more here: www.adn.com...=cpy

www.adn.com...





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