It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

big fat bee

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 12 2012 @ 04:52 AM
link   
These guys are great,they came back even though crops were slow.....I lost an apple tree and a pear dammit.


they don't sting,so let them fly

edit on 12-5-2012 by SarnholeOntarable because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 12 2012 @ 05:35 AM
link   
sight for sore eyez havent seen regular bees yet just bumbles, horseflies and MOSQUITOs already, its crazy.

were they very young or very old trees?

odd if they are middle aged and perished. its been warm and drought has eased up some.

sadly with all the radiation, ive noticed most our tender species of plants are succumbing to lots of fungal and other parasitic/viral diseases and/or mutated growth




posted on May, 12 2012 @ 05:51 AM
link   
reply to post by SarnholeOntarable
 

Aww that was to short. You just can tell those bees are wallowing in exactly what they love and need. I was mesmerized by that. Thank you for bzzzinging them.



posted on May, 12 2012 @ 08:30 AM
link   
Those are carpenter bees, true bumblebees nest in the ground. As for being stingless you're half-right - the males have no stinger but the females who excavate wood to make her nest come fully equipped.



posted on May, 12 2012 @ 02:46 PM
link   
reply to post by BiggerPicture
 


Radiation?? From where. Do you live near Chernoble?????



posted on May, 12 2012 @ 02:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by Asktheanimals
Those are carpenter bees, true bumblebees nest in the ground. As for being stingless you're half-right - the males have no stinger but the females who excavate wood to make her nest come fully equipped.

Carpentar bees are very large and mostly black. They have a little yellow on the thorax but the abdomen is completely black and shiny. See them work here...

www.carpenterbees.com...



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 08:51 AM
link   
reply to post by SarnholeOntarable
 


Fear not, a beekeeper in the US Pacific Northwest found a wild bee colony that has developed immunity to a fungal pathogen called Nosema Ceranae, which is being investigated as one possible cause of Colony Collapse Disorder. Here's a link to that report in the NRDC OnEarth magazine:

www.onearth.org...



posted on May, 16 2012 @ 08:56 AM
link   
BEAUTIFUL!!!

And now that you started Bee videos... I'll probably regret this - but - I'll share mine.

Added note? I have no problem with bees here - honey bees are doing great in Sicily!

Beyond that? I just had to 'nest' my orange tree - sometimes it's not the bees fault - sometimes your older trees need to be lopped off and grafted. I'll make sure and send you a heads up when I post the pictures of easy home grafting!


So, bee-tween now and then? Here's my lil'buddies!



Please don't make me regret posting this, lol!

Peace


edit on 16-5-2012 by silo13 because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join