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The Blue on the Marble

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posted on May, 9 2012 @ 12:55 PM
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Through the years we have seen our fair share of reports on water. It is said a bubble of water 860 miles wide is all we have. Does this bring a sense of urgency to your mind. How about this one, plan for the SHTF scenario, store water. Or, Municipal water sources just taste bad, but water from the local pure watering hole is choice. No matter how you slice it water is being attacked, but in this way. For Sale !!! Yeah, you heard me , more and more water is for sale. Isn't water a truly free resource?

Here is AJ on one of his benders,


here is the Japan crisis and water


this one gets to some of the point


Bottom line it that for millions of years our Big Blue Marble is just that, Blue.
But could the hording of water for the purpose of greed create the Golbal crisis nobody saw coming?

How much water needs to be pulled out of the Eco System via Bottling, to create a disaster truly life ending.

Water is not really consumable, its an energy not created or destroyed...a truly Free resource. Until its put in a bottle.
think about it.
edit on 9-5-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 9 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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Were not actually far from it. As the population continues to explode out of control (mostly due to third world nations not having proper education programs. If the richest elite spent 30% of their incomes, we could truly change the world.) we will see food shortages, water shortages. We are already seeing drug shortages in hospitals.

We will all point fingers to imaginary ghosts when it happens. Sadly, it will be ourselves in the first world nations most to blame.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by rebellender
 

Originally posted by rebellender

It is said a bubble of water 860 miles wide is all we have.
Before now, I had never actually thought about it that way.


Just to be clear about it: This↓ image is supposedly depicting the exact same number that was stated in the OP (860 mile diameter).



About 70 percent of the Earth's surface is water-covered, and the oceans hold about 96.5 percent of all Earth's water. But water also exists in the air as water vapor, in rivers and lakes, in icecaps and glaciers, in the ground as soil moisture and earthgwaquifer.html, and even in you and your dog.

Still, all that water would fit into that "tiny" ball. The ball is actually much larger than it looks like on your computer monitor or printed page because we're talking about volume, a 3-dimensional shape, but trying to show it on a flat, 2-dimensional screen or piece of paper. That tiny water bubble has a diameter of about 860 miles, meaning the height (towards your vision) would be 860 miles high, too! That is a lot of water.

ga.water.usgs.gov...



Originally posted by rebellender

How much water needs to be pulled out of the Eco System via Bottling, to create a disaster truly life ending.

Water is not really consumable, its an energy not created or destroyed...a truly Free resource. Until its put in a bottle.

But the water that is bottled, still goes right back into the ecosystem. We drink it, and we give it back. How much of that '860 mile-diameter ball', is currently bottled? Not much.

I do get what you're saying, but personally, I seriously doubt that it could ever happen.

Bottom Line: The rich want to get richer. That is only done if they can turn a profit. Corporations spend their money on things that they can sell.

This would take a very very long time. It would have to be a rich corporation starting the process now, just so maybe in a few hundred years their great great great great great great great great great great great grandkids might be able to own all of the water in the world.


The rich are far too greedy.
They would not be able to continue bottling water, only to hoard it.




posted on May, 9 2012 @ 03:51 PM
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I suggest anyone with a well
to get a hand pump attachment
for it incase the electricity
goes out, always can put the attachment
on and pump water..



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by BrokenCircles



But the water that is bottled, still goes right back into the ecosystem. We drink it, and we give it back. How much of that '860 mile-diameter ball', is currently bottled? Not much. I do get what you're saying, but personally, I seriously doubt that it could ever happen.

 


perhaps one needs only to think bigger.
Think about all the distribution centers Nationally, Safeway, Walmart/ Winco, Costco.
Think about Nestle'
Now think Global and emerging economies. I had never seen pallets of water stacked like I did in the P.I.

Water is a resource that should never go in a bottle.
I think its a problem bigger than any of us can imagine and is a definite contributor to our climate.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by AaronWilson



We will all point fingers to imaginary ghosts when it happens. Sadly, it will be ourselves in the first world nations most to blame.

 

so very true


the hording of water I think can be the only way we do in our civilization.

Bottling water is not working with our Eco System.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 04:30 PM
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Originally posted by rebellender

Think about all the distribution centers Nationally, Safeway, Walmart/ Winco, Costco.
Think about Nestle'
Now think Global and emerging economies........
All of those companies share the same main goal:
Turn a profit, and continue making more money.
Hoarding = spending money without making a profit.



Originally posted by rebellender

I had never seen pallets of water stacked like I did in the P.I.
...which I am sure was not even close to the amount of water that it takes to fill a small lake.



I have no idea if this number is accurate. Way too many commas for me.

There are 70 million cubic miles of water in the Pacific, which equates to 187,189,915,062,857,142,857 gallons, (187 quintillion gallons or 187,189,915,062 billion gallons), of water in the Pacific Ocean.

wiki.answers.com...
Excluding every possible water source except The Pacific, how many of those 187 quintillion gallons do you think are currently bottled?



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


Ok if not in bottles where is the water?

unless you know how to make water disappear, other than storage, where did it go.

Yet, we are told there is a water crisis and its Global.

you are bright, where is the water which cannot be created or destroyed go.

How much do you think our government has stashed for emergencies?

Beer breweries can it for disaster prep.

In a fragile eco system what does it take to tip the boat?

stop selling it, stop bottling it...it should be free



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by rebellender
 

Originally posted by rebellender

Ok if not in bottles where is the water?

Same place it's always been→ Everywhere.


How come we never run out of water? After four and a half million years you’d think the water would be all used up! It’s not, though, because of one special process: the Hydrologic Cycle, more commonly called “the Water Cycle.”


This Hydrologic Cycle recycles the earth’s valuable water supply. In other words, the water keeps getting reused over and over. Just think, the next glass of water you drink could have been part of a dinosaur’s bath in the Mesozoic Era one hundred million years ago. Water in that glass of water could have been a liquid, a solid, and a gas countless times over thanks to the water cycle.

Foundation For Water & Energy Education




Originally posted by rebellender

unless you know how to make water disappear, other than storage, where did it go.

Yet, we are told there is a water crisis and its Global.
This is the first I've heard of that.
Who said that it was gone?



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Its a drop in the bucket, sure, but if emerging economies are considered along with population exploding we have a problem nobody is taking the time to look at.

Many countries have become very oriented toward bottled water. According to a 2001 World Wildlife Fund survey, individuals around the globe consume some 89 billion liters of bottle water annually, worth roughly $22 million. Citizens of the U.S. alone consume about 13 billions liters of bottled water. A 2000 report conducted by Yankelovich Partneers of the Rockefeller University discovered that 2.3 eight-ounce servings of the total 6.1 servings of water that are consumed daily are bottled water in the U.S. Bottled WaterConsumption


The ticking time bomb, Storage of marketable Bottled water

Globally almost every country is accepting the "bottled water culture." Millions of people get parts or all of their daily water values from bottled water. A study done by Green Nature suggests that over half of Americans drink bottled water, spending 240-10,000 times more than tap water. At the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, where I attend college, the "bottled water culture" definitely is in full swing. One cannot glance at a random student or faculty member book bag without finding a bottle of water stowed inside. Drinking bottled water is essentially a part of our culture today. We can look at any local, national or international sporting event and see the prevalence of bottled water. Apparently regular tap water in a bottle or cup has slowly begun to be looked down upon. Although many individuals will carry a reusable water bottle such as a Nalgene, most bottled water containers are thrown away after just one use. This may be due to the convenience of bottled water, as it is almost more readily available than tap water. source


edit on 9-5-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


not when its in a bottle and that is growing daily,

look you can disagree with me all you want to, you are free to do so.I get that its something you haven't thought about.

I cannot change the world,
but we can
edit on 9-5-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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I am against this bottled water fanaticism.

Nestles' is in the northern half of the lower peninsula of Michigan and there's been a battle for years about whether or not Nestles is stealing resources and damaging the ecosystem.

When local officials failed to respond to residents’ concerns, Swier and others formed the Michigan Citizens for Water Conservation (MCWC) and took their grievances to court. In 2003, the County Circuit Court ruled in their favor – that Nestlé’s actions were likely to narrow streams, expose mud flats and reduce flow levels. Pumping was ordered to a halt.

This didn’t stop Nestlé, which appealed the case to the Supreme Court of Michigan, ultimately arguing that MCWC and other citizen groups had no right to sue to protect local water resources.

www.stopcorporateabuse.org...


There is clearly a water crisis around the world, exacerbated by deforestation, drought, and lack of infrastructure in poor countries, that prevents even available water from reaching much of the population. But for the most part the U.S. remains blissfully unaware of the crisis, consuming an average 92 gallons of fresh water daily, compared to 44 gallons for Europeans and five gallons for Africans. The mushrooming popularity of bottled water in a country where tap water is safe to drink is symbolic of the drive to consume without thinking about the bigger picture. In the year 2000, according to the book "Blue Gold" by Maude Barlow, over eight billion gallons of water were bottled and traded globally, over 90 percent in non-renewable plastic.

www.indiaresource.org...


info on Nestles in Mecosta County, Michigan
waterwars.wordpress.com...
www.greatlakeslaw.org...
stopnestlewaters.org...
info on water diversion debates
mlui.org...
and here's the settlement reached between Nestle/Ice Mountain and Mecosta County.
www.mlive.com...

Nestles in other states
www.dcbureau.org...



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by rebellender
 


Originally posted by rebellender
reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


look you can disagree with me all you want to, you are free to do so.I get that its something you haven't thought about.
lmao. That's [color=99B076]~snippin~ weak. You can do better than that.

If you want to claim that I am somehow uninformed about this matter, then go ahead and attempt to inform me. Trying to blow me off as simply disagreeing with you, so that you can avoid answering a simple question, is just...........weak.



Since it appears that your entire issue here basically revolves around one specific unsubstantiated claim, let's try it again.....

Originally posted by BrokenCircles

Originally posted by rebellender

Ok if not in bottles where is the water?

unless you know how to make water disappear, other than storage, where did it go.

Yet, we are told there is a water crisis and its Global.
This is the first I've heard of that.
Who said that it was gone?

So...who told you that? I have only heard that rumor from one person, which coincidentally just happens to be you. Needless to say, I don't believe you.

So who told you that? and how do you know it is true?

What makes you think that water has gone somewhere?

What makes you think there is less water now, than there was in the past?








Originally posted by rebellender

not when its in a bottle and that is growing daily,
Yes, water is being bottled on a daily basis, but water bottles are also being emptied on a daily basis.

Every living creature on Earth uses [color=5B9FD4]NEEDS water, in order to survive. We drink it, then our bodies give it back. We cannot control that. That is just how it is.

Look around you. Water is everywhere.
We are constantly surrounded by water.
Water is the very essence of life, and our entire existence.
Water is in me. Water is in you. Water is in the ground. Water is in the air.
Water is everything.





Originally posted by rebellender

Its a drop in the bucket, sure, but if emerging economies are considered along with population exploding we have a problem nobody is taking the time to look at.
A higher population = more people drinking water.
Quite the opposite from more water being stored and hoarded.



Beer breweries can it for disaster prep.
Hundreds of thousands of gallons of beer are pissed out each day, going right back into the ecosystem.


Yesterdays piss might just be tomorrows beer.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by rebellender
Water is not really consumable, its an energy not created or destroyed...a truly Free resource.


Water can be created. The Kola superdeep borehole project revealed the hydrogen and oxygen being compressed into water at extreme depths. It may stop at some point, but earth will probably look like Mercury at that point.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 05:57 PM
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I think the distinction needs to be made between salt water and naturally occurring freshwater.

Concerns of running out of water in general are ridiculous.

Concerns about industry depleting sources of naturally occurring fresh water in particular locations is not so ridiculous.



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by justwokeup
 


question remains, how much water can be removed from the ecosystem before it effects weather patterns?



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