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Picture shows how all the water on Earth would fit into one 860-mile-wide ball

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posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


Hehe the shame on me... initially I mixed up diameter and radius dohx2!
Limbo




posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:13 PM
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Originally posted by Limbo
reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


Hehe the shame on me... initially I mixed up diameter and radius dohx2!
Limbo


Maths are hard. Then they went all metric and #. At least the U.S. ends up with with the ball of water.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:14 PM
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Odd perspective, does this ball contain all known and unknown water reserves contained underground? All water contained in the atmosphere?


CX

posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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Interesting picture.


If thats all there is on earth, you can see why people say that in the future wars will be fought over the control of water.

CX.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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Also pure water is h20. How much of that water is in fact dissolved/suspended minerals?
Limbo



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by Limbo
 

Average of 3.5% for seawater, so not very much.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:34 PM
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I saw this pic (or similar) a couple years ago, it also had a sphere representing all the air on earth (adjusted to sea level density) next to the ball of water. It inspired me to calculate how big the ball of meat comprised of all the humans on the earth would be.

I used the density of ground beef and an average human weight of around 125 lbs (children really pull it down) and came up with a sphere right around a kilometer in diameter (if I recollect correctly).

It was a surprisingly small ball of meat.
edit on 8-5-2012 by tjack because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:35 PM
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I would actually be more interested in seeing what a sphere of the entire earth population looks like balled up.

*With clothes on...

-or maybe not.

Not sure which would be funnier.


-----------

Edit, poster above beat me to it.

edit on 8-5-2012 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 



Feel free to re-run the math, like I said, it was a couple years ago. All I really remember is it wouldn't have been even remotely visible from space (unlike the water and air) and was somewhere in the neighborhood of a kilometer. I guessed at the average human weight, but I bet if you adjust it up and down a bit, the ball of meat doesn't change a whole lot.

I know I was in the ballpark, anyway. Such a tiny ball of meat all we humans would make.
edit on 8-5-2012 by tjack because: I added an "un"



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:57 PM
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The article claims this is the volume of surface water so I assume it doesn't include aquifers and other underground water?



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by tjack
 


Here you go:


I saw this pic (or similar) a couple years ago, it also had a sphere representing all the air on earth (adjusted to sea level density) next to the ball of water.






Left: All the water in the world (1.4087 billion cubic kilometres of it) including sea water, ice, lakes, rivers, ground water, clouds, etc.
Right: All the air in the atmosphere (5140 trillion tonnes of it) gathered into a ball at sea-level density. Shown on the same scale as the Earth.


(And this time, since someone asked "why" the water ball was over the USA.....we see it in perspective with Western Europe).

Oh, and the answer to "why"? Well, the article as basis for this thread was from a USCG study......


Also, source for the photo, above:

boingboing.net...

edit on Tue 8 May 2012 by ProudBird because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by jazz10

Originally posted by Outofcontrol
I'm sorry... I can't believe that.

I dont think thats accurate. I really had to do the math myself to actually believe such a claim.

Thats what i was thinking. I believe this signals a deception into leading the masses that water shortages are . a global thing. But i actually believe it is a case of making profit from water due to the soon to be loss in revenue from oil. Oil is yesterday, technology has moved us on. Watch this space regarding a water conspiracy and remember this thread.
I was right about Egypt


Yes, TPTB are planning on "privatizing" the world's water. All of it will be OWNED by one corporation.
This is just another one of those creeping tyrannies.
academic.evergreen.edu...

Yes, this article should shoot down all the fears of rising oceans. Only 1.7% of the Earth's water is locked up in ice.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by OhZone


Yes, this article should shoot down all the fears of rising oceans. Only 1.7% of the Earth's water is locked up in ice.

 



The total volume is approximately 1.3 billion cubic kilometres (310 million cu mi)[6] with an average depth of 3,790 metres (12,430 ft).


1.7% times the average ocean depth is still around 200ft. Not sure if that's how you would calculate a rise if all the locked up water melted, but sure doesn't sound good for countries 200ft or less above sea level.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:43 PM
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Originally posted by facelift
reply to post by jazz10
 


Why is the ball over north america..?




Because despite popular belief, the earth revolves around America.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by webpirate
I'm pretty sure this is talking about FRESHwater. Not all water. That little bubble would completely disappear into the Marianas Trench without so much as a wave to James Cameron.


edit on 8-5-2012 by LittleBlackEagle because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


This is just an estimate.....You can't physically weigh the earth, or the water for that matter.....You would need to know the approximate depth of the water and how much ground the water covered to come up with the exact number....

Your "estimate" is based on what they say the earth weighs and the water! Did they throw the earth on a scale and subtract the water to find the weight?? Come on!!

To find out a better estimate you would need the approximate depth of the water worldwide and how many miles of water is at this depth to calculate the total.....These numbers are bogus, plain and simple!



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 03:24 PM
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that ball could fit any deep place
it could also represent the indian ocean in total

fresh water maybe but not the salt water



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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Stop speculating about what it may represent. They flat out TELL you what it is intended to represent. Please read again:


Left: All the water in the world (1.4087 billion cubic kilometres of it) including sea water, ice, lakes, rivers, ground water, clouds, etc. Right: All the air in the atmosphere (5140 trillion tonnes of it) gathered into a ball at sea-level density. Shown on the same scale as the Earth.


Now whether or not it's accurate is up for debate, but the number is obviously based on something, and is quite likely "in the ball park" as they say.

They've got 3d topographical mapping of the entire planet, so it shouldn't be too hard to get at least close to what they're claiming.

My 5th grade teacher drew an arc on the chalkboard with a particular length of string one day. It was large, taking up at least 1/2 the chalkboard. This was an approximate scale representation of the mantle thickness relative to the size of the earth. He then removed the tiniest bit of width from a portion of the arc and explained that it represented the average ocean depth. He then drew a tiny line, barely visible, and told us that was about the scale of the highest mountain.

As big and mighty as the oceans may seem, they are still just a skim-coat relative to the actual size of the planet.

Just sayin'



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 04:16 PM
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Originally posted by Ben81
that ball could fit any deep place
it could also represent the indian ocean in total

fresh water maybe but not the salt water


That's what I initially thought. Then I did some math. Screwed it up, and did some more math. And yeah, it's definitely in the ballpark.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by tjack
I saw this pic (or similar) a couple years ago, it also had a sphere representing all the air on earth (adjusted to sea level density) next to the ball of water. It inspired me to calculate how big the ball of meat comprised of all the humans on the earth would be.

I used the density of ground beef and an average human weight of around 125 lbs (children really pull it down) and came up with a sphere right around a kilometer in diameter (if I recollect correctly).

It was a surprisingly small ball of meat.
edit on 8-5-2012 by tjack because: (no reason given)


Now you just have to find a ball of Season-All about 20 meters in diameter. And an onion about 100 meters in diameter...





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