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Picture shows how all the water on Earth would fit into one 860-mile-wide ball

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posted on May, 9 2012 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by ArtOfTrance
 


Yes, the Pacific is a very wide basin of water. But its not 800 some miles deep. That's where you are getting this wrong. We are talking about a sphere with a spherical diameter of 860 miles. A vastly larger volume of water fits in a sphere that large.




posted on May, 9 2012 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by jb1958
 


Yes:


A vastly larger volume of water fits in a sphere that large.


HENCE, to formula:

4/3 Pi r (cubed)


How many times must this MATH be shown???



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by jazz10
 



Total lie. The Mariana Trench is less then 1 percent of the water on the Earth, and it is...
1,580 miles long
6.78 miles deep (average)
43 miles wide (average)

en.wikipedia.org...

EVEN IF you took a below average number of the measurements, lets say 6 miles deep and 42 miles wide, that comes to 252 square miles of water, just in the Mariana Trench.

And compared to the rest of the areas of water around the Earth, that is just a drop in the bucket. Then considering the large underground river, lakes and caverns, that can't be accounted for on top of that, if you could.

So the bottom line, is the 860 ball of water is a total lie and propaganda.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 11:21 PM
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reply to post by Krumm
 


Please, feel free to calculate the math:


Total lie. The Mariana Trench is less then 1 percent of the water on the Earth, and it is...
1,580 miles long
6.78 miles deep (average)
43 miles wide (average)


I just did....1.580 x 6.78 x 43 = 460,633. ASSUMING you are using "miles", then that is about (at most) 500,000 CUBIC MILES.

Next??



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by Krumm
reply to post by jazz10
 



Total lie. The Mariana Trench is less then 1 percent of the water on the Earth, and it is...
1,580 miles long
6.78 miles deep (average)
43 miles wide (average)

en.wikipedia.org...

EVEN IF you took a below average number of the measurements, lets say 6 miles deep and 42 miles wide, that comes to 252 square miles of water, just in the Mariana Trench.

And compared to the rest of the areas of water around the Earth, that is just a drop in the bucket. Then considering the large underground river, lakes and caverns, that can't be accounted for on top of that, if you could.

So the bottom line, is the 860 ball of water is a total lie and propaganda.



volume isn't measured in square miles, it's measured in cubic miles. Even with that being said. According to your measurements, the diameter of the sphere that contained the water you speak of from the Mariana Trench would be about 95 miles, that's only the measurements you listed here from the surface of the water to the depths of the trench. You don't seem to be getting the concept of volume and spheres.
Keep in mind that a gallon of water looks really small compared to the size of a water tower. You aren't thinking of relative size here. The earth is pretty darn large and only the surface of the earth has water, it doesn't go all the way down to the core of the earth.
The radius of the earth is close to 4000 miles, that's from the surface where you are to the core. That's more than the width of the United States (about 3000 miles from the easternmost to westernmost point). That's how deep the earth is, the water only covers the surface and the AVERAGE ocean depth is about 2 1/2 miles. That's a big, big BIG difference when you compare 2.5 to 4000.
The math really is correct and the picture really is accurate. Trust me, I have a degree in Math to support it.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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Maybe another reference that will help some of you. A sphere with that size diameter would yield about 330,000,000 cubic miles of water.
It's only confusing you because they are comparing it to the volume of the earth. If that sphere was sitting in the Mariana Trench, as a sphere (which you cite as being 6.78 miles deep), it would still be about 860 miles high. The space station is about 220 miles above the surface of the earth, so that sphere would be almost 4 times as far up as the space station is. That's really, really REALLY deep water

edit on 9-5-2012 by PurpleChiten because: left out a word



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


You are (approximately) correct:


A sphere with that size diameter would yield about 330,000,000 cubic miles of water.


THIS ( ^ ^ ^ ) has been mentioned, already...but THANKS for bringing it up, again!!



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 02:37 AM
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This will not include all the water that constitutes life.

That is, all the trees, plants, animal life, clouds, atmosphere, human beings ect ect. All of which is pretty much made up of water and eventually turns back into water.

I bet theres more water than that in the global populations bladders!

That 860 mile wide bubble is nonsense.



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 03:28 AM
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reply to post by Silverlake
 


Oh, contraire....(just check the MATH, please).

OH AND...in case it was "over-looked"...here is the water, AND the air....all "rolled up" into a "ball":



Just try to THINK, for at least one moment!!


edit on Thu 10 May 2012 by ProudBird because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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Originally posted by Chrisfishenstein

Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
I doubt it is only fresh water because it's shown next to a completely barren dry Earth. Water doesn't make up a huge percentage of the Earth.


No not at all.....Only around 70%.......Pretty small amount......


70% of the SURFACE AREA.

Not the total mass



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 04:13 AM
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Dear people that believe the picture is inaccurate / BS / propaganda / nonsense / etc.:

The analogies of an apple and its skin or a baseball covered by a layer of latex posted earlier are quite accurate. Don't take my word for it though - take my picture instead:



The large grey circles are supposed to represent earth, the little blue spheres are the entire bodies of water. If the entire earth were covered by a whopping 100km of water, you would end up with the situation on the left. The 'world sea' is just visible as a blue outline. A hundred km of water covering the entire earth may seem like a lot, but even counting the 100km of water on both sides, it just takes up 200/12742 = 1.5% of the diameter of the earth*. Volume-wise it would be 4.8% of the entire earth, and would all fit in a sphere of 4625km wide. If we take a more sane (yet still completely ludicrous) mean depth of 10km, the 'world sea' isn't even visible anymore**. Thanks to the dimensional difference between cubic and square scaling though, the sphere representing the body of water is - even though it is 10 times smaller (5.2*10^10 vs 5.1*10^9) - only 2.16 times as narrow.***

The article describes the hypothetical sphere with a width of 860 miles. When spread out over the surface of the earth as depicted in the most right situation, this still comes down to a mean depth of 2.7km! If anything, the sphere should look too large to us, rather than too small. I'm quite sure there isn't 2.7km of water everywhere.. it is not hard at all to imagine that less obvious sources of water are accounted for.

So what's the reason it seems entirely too small? In my calculated opinion, it's simply due to our completely crappy sense of 'volume conservation'. By 'default', we are horrible in dealing with volume by intuition. We grow up gaining a grasp of most common volume manipulations, but we really start from scratch - see this legendary experiment by psychologist Piaget: www.youtube.com...

If anyone is interested in the actual math, I'll gladly oblige a request - merely ommitted from this post to keep it readable.

* Keeping it easy here - the mean radius of earth probably includes the entiry body of water whereas I'm laying it 'on top' of the earth here. Should be a minor difference.
** At this resolution anyway.. I have an enormous render of 3840x2160, but it only shows a faint outline for 10km.
*** If you have a hard time believing me; V=4/3*pi*r^3, so if r doubles - let's say x = r*2 - then the volume-wise scaling is (4/3*pi*x^3)/(4/3*pi*r^3) = x^3 / r^3 = (2*r * 2*r * 2*r) / (r^2) = 8r^2 / r^2 = 8. The 'trick' is in the power of three / cubicialiciousness. Just like in a cube of 1: width/length/height is 1=1, surface of one face is 1^2=1, and volume is 1^3=1; compare to a cube of 2: width = 2, surface = 2^2 = 4, and volume is 2^3 = 8. Basically, the scaling factor of one dimension is the square root of the scaling factor of a dimension lower, and vice versa. This is actually a very important 'law', as it defines for example how large mammals can grow while keeping their surface/volume relation in balance (which we need for things like breathing & digesting food - and is why those organs are so 'folded' on the inside; so that the surface area can 'keep up' with the volume it relates too). Did.. did that help at all?
edit on 10-5-2012 by scraze because: wrong image url
edit on 10-5-2012 by scraze because: An asterisk was missing.
edit on 10-5-2012 by scraze because: To != too. And stuff.



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 04:40 AM
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If that is correct 860 mile ball is all of earths water, would that make all of earths above sea level surface area fit into a 368 mile ball??



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by duffdean
 


I see what you did there - relate the 860 mile ball to the 70.8% of the surface of earth..
To get from two dimensions (surface) to three (volume) though, you need to add a dimension, in this case thickness / height. According to en.wikipedia.org... the mean height of land above sea-level is 840m or 0.84km. If we ignore the bodies of water that are above sea level (because it's easier o/ ), that would mean that we have a volume of 29.2% * earth's surface * 0.84km, or about 1.25 * 10^8 km; were we to stuff that in a sphere, the sphere would have a diameter of just 620km or 385 miles. Veritably tiny!
edit on 10-5-2012 by scraze because: Fixed hash in url
edit on 10-5-2012 by scraze because: Fixed a number.



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 05:39 AM
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Originally posted by duffdean
If that is correct 860 mile ball is all of earths water, would that make all of earths above sea level surface area fit into a 368 mile ball??

YES! Yes it would

Since 70% is covered with water, .7x=860, solve for x, then take 30% and you have the "dry land" surface area!


reg

posted on May, 10 2012 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by ProudBird
reply to post by reg
 



what i'd like to ask anyone tho is how do they know how much the earth weighs exactly?


Here's the answer:


The quick answer to that is: approximately 6,000,000,000,000 ,000,000,000,000 (6E+24) kilograms.


One Source

AND here.......

How do scientists measure or calculate the weight of a planet?

This isn't "difficult" science.....BIG numbers, yes.....difficult, no.........

(Thanks to Sir Isaac Newton..... lol....He'd LOL at people today, if he were still alive!! )....

edit on Wed 9 May 2012 by ProudBird because: (no reason given)


Cheers m8



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by ProudBird
 


Thank you, I really appreciate that.

Actually, the idea has a morbid influence, lol.

I like forensics, and a long time back I was watching a show where they were discussing blood spills from a murder scene. They said that witnesses always greatly exaggerate how much blood has been spilled, because if you take just a little bit and spill it on the ground, it spreads and looks to be much more then it is. To prove their point, they took like a cup of blood and poured it on the ground. After it was done spreading, they quizzed people on how much they think it was, and because of the amount of surface it spread, people reported it as being a quart or more.



posted on May, 12 2012 @ 02:42 AM
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reply to post by jazz10
 


this was made me really thirsty and quite humbled, great message and was glad to share with friends and family. Great post thank you



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 10:03 PM
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For those still having trouble with the concept of volume, this may be helpful to you:

www.khanacademy.org...

The site has lots of great videos that reinforce concepts you haven't been exposed to for a long time and have forgotten.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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Good thread. Looks like we got the concept understood. All that water really will fit into that relatively small sphere. Amazing.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by jb1958
Good thread. Looks like we got the concept understood. All that water really will fit into that relatively small sphere. Amazing.


Yet only small relative to the size of the earth. Compared to the volume of a single person, it would look (and be) ENORMOUS! We couldn't even represent it with a tiny speck.






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