It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mining permit backlog leaves U.S. dependent on China for widely used rare minerals

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 8 2012 @ 06:20 AM
link   
Mining permit backlog leaves U.S. dependent on China for widely used rare minerals
Human Events 05/07/2012


High tech manufacturing of items like electronics, solar panels, military items, etc. all use minerals called "Rare Earths".

Many have some real funny names like terbium, yttrium and dysprosium to name only three.

The U.S. is heavily dependent on China for those minerals.

Well. It seems the U.S. has an estimated $6 trillion worth of many right here at home !!!

But something is getting in the way of mining efforts !


Strategic minerals that are essential components in green and high technology such as hybrid cars, iPods and solar panels are readily available in the U.S. but efforts to mine the elements are being stalled by bureaucrats for years, industry officials say.

“The United States is heavily reliant on foreign countries such as China for critical minerals that are the building blocks of our economy and imperative to renewable energy development, military technology and the manufacturing of nearly all of our electronic devices,” said Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), chairman of the House Resources Committee.

There are 15 such rare earth minerals worth more than $6 trillion, including terbium, yttrium and dysprosium that are found throughout the U.S.

To increase access, Republican lawmakers are supporting legislation called the Strategic and Critical Minerals Production Act that they say tackles the highest hurdle of getting the needed permits to begin mining operations.



The big stall... Where is Obama ?

Hall Quinn, president of the National Mining Association, said at a recent House hearing on the bill that it often takes 10 years to get a mining permit. “The length, complexity and uncertainty of the permitting process are the primary reasons investors give for not investing in U.S. minerals mining,” Quinn said.

“Delaying permits for mining projects is not a new problem. What is new is the growing awareness of its implications for our nation, particularly in a highly competitive world economy in which the demand for minerals continues to grow, especially in fast growing economies led by China and India,” Quinn said.

The bill authored by Rep. Mark Amodei (R-Nev.) would reverse a 30-year trend of increased reliance on foreign countries and fierce competition to gain access to the needed resources. “In the 2012 ranking of countries for mining investment, the United States ranked last, tied with Papua New Guinea, in permitting delays,” Amodei said.



Lots of jobs at stake !

Is somebody gett'n paid off ?





posted on May, 8 2012 @ 06:27 AM
link   
This is unbelievable. I could just cry....We're doing it all to ourselves! China has been working for 10 years or more to lock up under contracts and treaties, every spot they can find these around the world outside their own borders.

I don't fault them for that...It sounds just like what we'd do. .....Used to do... Now? They pretty well corner this whole market as I understand the USA Today articles I read about this over the years.

Now?? We're tying up the little we DO have control over and ability to mine? Wasn't screwing up permits in the Gulf long enough for big rigs to leave for other sites enough? Isn't crippling coal enough??? We have to tie our own hands, by choice, on our little bit of Rare's as well???

(pushes game over button and awaits a Reboot to 1999)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 06:30 AM
link   
Between South Dakota, Colorado, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Alaska....

We can't pull the rare earth metals that we have out of the ground? Each of those states especially Alaska has huge deposits that we're just sitting on...and it's enough to carry the US for a century.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 11:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by xuenchen

Hall Quinn, president of the National Mining Association, said at a recent House hearing on the bill that it often takes 10 years to get a mining permit. “The length, complexity and uncertainty of the permitting process are the primary reasons investors give for not investing in U.S. minerals mining,” Quinn said.

“Delaying permits for mining projects is not a new problem. What is new is the growing awareness of its implications for our nation, particularly in a highly competitive world economy in which the demand for minerals continues to grow, especially in fast growing economies led by China and India,” Quinn said.

The bill authored by Rep. Mark Amodei (R-Nev.) would reverse a 30-year trend of increased reliance on foreign countries and fierce competition to gain access to the needed resources. “In the 2012 ranking of countries for mining investment, the United States ranked last, tied with Papua New Guinea, in permitting delays,” Amodei said.


Wow...a House hearing?? How does the average Joe get one of those? With everything going on this country nice to see the GOP stop and spend time to help the mining industry figure out how to skirt safety regulations and brainstorm ways to get around those bothersome communities that don't want a mining facility next-door.

I am sure that the National Mining Association didn't offer payola in return for the GOPs hearings?

Opensecrets: National Mining Association



Originally posted by xuenchen


The bill authored by Rep. Mark Amodei (R-Nev.) would reverse a 30-year trend of increased reliance on foreign countries and fierce competition to gain access to the needed resources. “In the 2012 ranking of countries for mining investment, the United States ranked last, tied with Papua New Guinea, in permitting delays,” Amodei said.


Wow...Rep. Mark Amodei must really have come away from that hearing feeling really passionate about the issue! That or the National Mining Association is his #1 Contributor

Rep. Amodei - #1 Contributor National Mining Association

Also see here
Sourcewatch: National Mining Association
www.sourcewatch.org...


Why does the GOP want to turn us into China???



China has a stranglehold on the global supply of 17 rare earth materials essential for making high-end goods such as hybrid cars, camera lenses, mobile phones and weapons.

About half come from Bayan Obo, a single mine.

On July 2, 2001 (below) and June 30, 2006 (above), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired these false-color views of the mine in the Nei Mongol Autonomous Region.

Vegetation appears red, grassland is light brown, rocks are black, and water surfaces are green. Two circular open-pit mines are visible, as well as a number of tailings ponds and tailings piles. Use the image comparison tool to see how the mine has grown larger since 2001. According to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report, China produced about 81,000 tons of rare earth metals in 2001; the number jumped to about 120,000 by 2006.

Such an intensive mining operation has a definite impact on the surrounding environment. According to the Chinese Society of Rare Earths, 9,600 to 12,000 cubic meters (340,000 to 420,000 cubic feet) of waste gas—containing dust concentrate, hydrofluoric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfuric acid—are released with every ton of rare metals that are mined.

Approximately 75 cubic meters (2,600 cubic feet) of acidic wastewater, plus about a ton of radioactive waste residue are also produced.
Around 100 miles south of Baiyun Obo, larger rare-earth refineries sit around the banks of the world's largest tailing lake, Baogang - seven square miles of evil-smelling toxic waste that shows the shocking extent of this industry's impact.



www.dailymail.co.uk... a-satellites.html
edit on 8-5-2012 by Indigo5 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 11:08 AM
link   

Originally posted by GrandHeretic
Between South Dakota, Colorado, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Alaska....

We can't pull the rare earth metals that we have out of the ground? Each of those states especially Alaska has huge deposits that we're just sitting on...and it's enough to carry the US for a century.


Or how about we don't destroy our envirornment like China?


Without dispute, the mining and processing of rare earths have many toxic and even radioactive byproducts — which is one reason the West and Japan for decades were reluctant to produce them.

www.nytimes.com...

Toyota finds alternative to rare earth metals for hybrids: report
www.caradvice.com.au...

While Rare-Earth Trade Dispute Heats Up, Scientists Seek Alternatives
news.nationalgeographic.com...

We can find an alternative without becoming China.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 05:14 PM
link   
reply to post by Indigo5
 


Good points about the pollution issues.

But we have to wonder why the U.S. has been favoring foreign mined minerals that cause just as much pollution.

If it was such a gigantic world wide problem, why hasn't the U.N. demanded a 100% moratorium on all pollution causing trade ? Or even the U.S. for that matter. The U.S. could actually enforce it too.

It must be the money.

Corruption causes more "pollution" than anything else.

Strange and ironic too is the fact that many green energy products use these materials.

I bet they can mine and contain the pollutants and clean up afterwards. But that might cost too much for the studies needed to figure out how.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 05:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by xuenchen
reply to post by Indigo5
 


Good points about the pollution issues.

But we have to wonder why the U.S. has been favoring foreign mined minerals that cause just as much pollution.


For better or worse, the USA..plus most other nations, get their Rare earth minerals from China because China has historically proven they don't give a crap about polluting the envirornment and when the village next complains about mutations and cancer rates, the Chinese government simply doesn't report it and jails folks that speak up.

Radioactive and toxic waste wouldn't go over as well in the USA or London or other nations. That is why China has the rare earth metals market cornered.

Ironically, China has jacked up the price...everyone complained...and China claims it has to charge a higher price because...wait for it..they are going to put envirornmental safeguards in place at the mines.


If it was such a gigantic world wide problem, why hasn't the U.N. demanded a 100% moratorium on all pollution causing trade ? Or even the U.S. for that matter. The U.S. could actually enforce it too.


Becuase it isn't a "worldwide" problem..the pollution is a China problem.



Strange and ironic too is the fact that many green energy products use these materials.

That is a bit of cherry picking. All cars these days have CPUs that use rare earths, ditto iPads, laptops etc. etc. etc.

Green cars might use a little more for the batteries, but most technology uses rare earths.

The best course is to find an alternative that doesn't require tearing up thousands of square miles in the USA while creating toxic and yes, radioactive pollution.

Many universities and corporations are very close to finding better alternatives.

BUT that won't benefit the "Mining Association" in the OP, so you won't hear much about it...MONEY...MONEY...MONEY.




top topics



 
4

log in

join