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Which of the below should I major in and why?

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posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:07 AM
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Hey guys, me again. I just finished my second year, 4th semester, of college and I have not yet decided a clear major. I am 24, will be 25 next semester, so I'm kinda old for a college student I guess. I have never had a job, I've done "work" and been able to survive, but have never had a job for a company or anything like that which would take taxes out of your pay and that you would list as a previous job. When I first started school I thought that I would either major in something in the business side of things or engineering, but honestly after some long hard thought the business thing just doesn't seem right for me - I highly doubt I could ever really be even slightly happy doing it. I will owe A LOT back so I need something that will allow me to survive within my means while also being able to pay back all of that student loan debt.

I have always been interested in math and science. I was considering Psychology as a possible major but the odds of going all the way through and into a Phd program really don't seem to be in my favor. So right no I am thinking that I want to go electronics engineering major and I have a buddy who is finishing up his geology major trying to convince me to go into that. So basically where I am at right now is, what should I do, I mean I am mostly done with all of the gen ed crap and I really need to pick a major. I know the job market sucks, and I don't have anything to put on a resume at the moment nor do I have any previous jobs to list. Do you guys think that I could stand any chance at all at getting an entry level job in engineering? Would geology be a better choice? Do any of you work in either field or know someone who does? What should I truly expect from either of those majors? Can I find work with only a bachelor degree in either of those fields? What would that work probably start out at? I've done a lot of research but I find it hard to believe that I would have any chance at starting out earning over 50k a year, especially somewhere closer to 65k a year - are these websites giving honest "average" and "median" earnings in the U.S.?

Would I be better off going for a math or physics degree to get a job in engineering? Right now I'm kinda thinking on major in electronics engineering technology with a minor in management if I can pull that off. I would prefer a hands on kind of job to just sitting in an office all day and I also don't want to write code all day long, that's why I don't really have much of an interest in software engineering. Also I live in east Tennessee and would be financially unable to relocate very far after school, but we do have a few plants and whatnot, there is actually a company called Eastman that hires a lot of people from different backgrounds really close to me. I go to East Tennessee State University if that helps.




posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:25 AM
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I recommend some kind of engineering degree. It will be difficult but it will be the least negatively effected degree you can get, I would think. Everybody needs engineers.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:32 AM
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reply to post by doomedtoday
 


I would say to really weigh what you think will make you happy and what you will enjoy doing the most. I did not do that and only am in my current profession because my main factors were money and ease of employment and now I hate the environment. Any of the options you listed would be good fields to get into I believe. Ultimately I think even if you had to wait a bit longer to get your career going, doing it the one you REALLY want to do would be worth it.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:35 AM
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You won't like my advice but I'll give it anyway.

The status quo we live in currently requires you to tighten your belt. Cut costs, pay down debt.

Hemorrhaging money for schooling and the risk of finding a job is astronomical.

Look at the want ads, 2 years experience OR bachelors degree. Companies don't want college grads, they want experience.

My advice, submit your resume NOW to EVERYONE with whatever you have right now. Get a job, get the experience. Let the employer finish your schooling.

Told ya you wouldn't like it



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:43 AM
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reply to post by litterbaux
 


That is good advice too. I got a job in my field during my college years and by the time I was finished with school (which the company did finish up for me
) I was making more money than all of the guys right out of school. It will also give you a feel for how you like the job.
edit on 8-5-2012 by scorpiosin because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:26 AM
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Please do not troll this with your negative crap. I am seriously asking for friendly advice, not asking to be told how wrong I am for trying to escape the ruthless grasp of poverty which has cursed my family for generations. One of the main reason that I did not go to college when I was 18 was because my mother-in-law kept telling my wife and I how much of a mistake it would be and how we would never escape the debt. Well you know what, at 22 despite all possible efforts on my part, I was still unable to find a job. Seriously, I don't know if I am cursed or what, but even with multiple attempts at places such as McDonald's I could never get an interview. 17-22, with 5 years of not being able to find a job I had to do something, just going into all of the same places that I had already tried numerous times wasn't doing anything for me. Unlike many my age I do not come from a "normal" family, I couldn't get any help from family and I had no "connections," you can say those things don't mater, but you would be fooling yourself because myself and others that I have known are proof that they do indeed matter.

I have two children to provide for. So if you do not want me in college, find me a job that will allow me to pay off the student loan debt that I now owe as well as allowing me to properly provide for my family without need of government assistance, and I will gladly leave college behind for a career now. Otherwise, if you can't offer any meaningful advice other than just snark comments and pessimistic crap please do not troll my post. If I wanted to be told ho much of a failure I am for making some kind of effort because I am smart enough to realize that life sucks and nothing is going to just fall into my lap, then I would just talk to any of the people over 50 around me who keep telling me how wrong I am for being in school, people who all earn less than 25k a year by the way...

I did not make this post in hopes of having people who want to tell me how wrong I am in order to make themselves feel better about their own failures bring in all of their negativity. I suffer from both major depression and borderline personality disorder, some say I should just give up on trying to find work and just try to get a check from the government, but I actually want to do something with my life, and hopefully doing so will help with my depression. So please leave the negative crap in the car, I already wish that I could just die and escape this miserable world and my miserable life, the last thing I need right now is your pessimism.
edit on 8-5-2012 by doomedtoday because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 03:00 AM
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reply to post by doomedtoday
 


I tried engineering and let me say if you don't love physics and math then don't do it. Otherwise you will make great money with a bachelors and there is a big need for engineers. Be realistic though because its not going to be an easy degree to finish and you don't want to waste your time and money. And the person saying experience only matters is totally wrong. You cant get out in a field like that without a degree. My advice though is to try finding a job or internship related to these degrees because the pay wont matter one bit if you hate the field and if you find yourself hating it there is still time to fix it.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by tenplayr99
 


Thanks man, that is what I am looking for, meaningful advice. But yeah, for me it is pretty much just trying to figure out what would be the best way to go about it and to see if anybody knows if there are any jobs in either the geology field or electronics engineering field around where I live. I assume I could probably qualify for entry level electrical engineering jobs as well with a degree in electronics engineering. I have always been interested in math and sciences, so I'm not too worried about that part. One of the tings that makes me believe that going the engineering path would be good for me is that while I am very aware that it is difficult, I also know that it will be a lot easier for me to put in the hard work and effort required into something that I can find interests in rather than something excruciatingly dull like business classes. And besides, according to all of my research, it is the business jobs that are about the only ones you can get with just experience, and even with a degree you still need experience - something I do not have, not to mention that everybody and their mother goes the business path, and in this economy those are some of the least stable jobs - so lots of competition, low odds of actually qualifying for the job, and fairly low on the job security scale - all reasons for me not to pursue a business degree.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 10:20 AM
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reply to post by doomedtoday
 


I agree that since you *are* interested in the math/sciences, you should pursue the engineering-type degree. I am a bit biased because I work in engineering in a near-by state university. I have placed individuals in career positions in the SW VA/WV/TN areas...a lot of people are not willing to live in these places...so a technical degree is very valuable for you.


2 points of advice:

1) Meet with an advisor in your desired career path, you mentioned electronics so here is a very specific link for you:

applieddesign.etsu.edu...

The reason I say this is because they will obviously have information on degree specifics, but often have "insider" knowledge about employment opps related to the field. We have a "co-op" program at my university where a student is able to rotate semesters between working and studying, and still remain a full-time student so you don't miss out on benefits.

2) Always check with U Career Services, too, on a regular basis--as they can help you with your internship/co-op/full time employment. They are valuable for leads, and helping you build a specific, targeted resume. Lots of them have data bases, job/internship fairs. Here you go:

www.etsu.edu...


Most importantly, be persistent, and motivated with anyone you interact with at ETSU. You will "stick out" in their minds that way


Best of luck, and let us know how things work out for you....



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by litterbaux
 



Look at the want ads, 2 years experience OR bachelors degree. Companies don't want college grads, they want experience.


Thing is though, these days, without a degree, you may not even get a foot in the door to get that interview.

Without at least a Bachelor's degree, I wouldn't have even been interviewed for my last two jobs (including my current one). A lot of companies don't even talk to a candidate until the computer has pulled their resumes using a program to compare key words in the resume with the job requirements.

Now, I got my Masters more as a personal thing, and hopefully to teach at some point...but I'll also echo to do something you will enjoy. Don't get a degree for the money. You want to be working at something that at least is acceptable, but even better if it can inspire you.

College is a BIG investment, likely the second biggest one you'll make (next to a house), so use it wisely.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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reply to post by doomedtoday
 


Any engineering discipline..except civil. You will earn a comfortable living.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 10:11 PM
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First off, I'm familiar with area, school, and even the company you mention. Though I was but a tadpole then.

I'd suggest looking at the types of jobs available with either. With a geology major you may be apt to travel more (and often) in your career sometimes to some remote places. You usually go to the rocks instead of them coming to you.


With Engineering Technology you would be more likely to find something local or at least local(ish) I would think as you'll have a more diverse set of skills to apply.

Yes, I know - everyone wants experience and nobody wants to give you any. It's true and it sucks. Hang in there - many folks have to stick it out in a job that isn't the best right out of school till they get a few years experience under their belts.



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