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If your a victim of Mortgage fraud, File a lien against your property!

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posted on May, 7 2012 @ 10:17 PM
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Seriously, I read about how banks are funneling peoples mortgage payments to off shore accounts and filing foreclosure papers. If these people can prove they made a payment, they can easily file for a lien in local courts. And if enough people do it, the banks can't deal with them all = people will get their homes free and clear.

The Banks I doubt, will be able to repay the money they stole because me thinks they have been using it to keep the EU afloat(that or recover profits from their quick fed repayment from the bailout debts they paid a little too quickly).

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Even if you already where kicked out, you can file a lien against the bank office building itself. Or if the home wasn't resold against the home.
edit on 7-5-2012 by korathin because: (no reason given)



*I make no legal claims so please consult with an attorney first
edit on 7-5-2012 by korathin because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 7 2012 @ 10:50 PM
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Interesting, file a lien against your own home? You'd have to show "it" owes you something for some contract that was not honored, but the interesting thing about this is that it will tie up the house for YEARS, as you can Pro Se and the court will bend over backwards to give you time to make your case. With 60 day extensions granted without issue, I could see you getting several years in your house for a few court appearances and some legal work, in the meantime you'd be avoiding rent as it would be in dispute.

No legal advice here, just speculating for fun.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 11:27 PM
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HAHAHA....good idea, if my house wasn't paid off I'd give it a whirl



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:04 AM
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Originally posted by crankyoldman
Interesting, file a lien against your own home? You'd have to show "it" owes you something for some contract that was not honored, but the interesting thing about this is that it will tie up the house for YEARS, as you can Pro Se and the court will bend over backwards to give you time to make your case. With 60 day extensions granted without issue, I could see you getting several years in your house for a few court appearances and some legal work, in the meantime you'd be avoiding rent as it would be in dispute.

No legal advice here, just speculating for fun.


One thing people have to keep in mind is: Until it is paid off, the title belongs to the bank= the bank owns the house because the house is kept as collateral until the loan is paid off. If my understanding is correct. So what your doing is placing a lien against a bank asset.
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Also, you wouldn't be avoiding rent and the court cases wouldn't take a decade.

www.ehow.com...

consumerist.com...
edit on 8-5-2012 by korathin because: (no reason given)


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I meant this topic for these people in this type of situation where the bank stole deposit money meant to pay on a mortgage.

www.abovetopsecret.com...


edit on 8-5-2012 by korathin because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-5-2012 by korathin because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by korathin
 

What a clever and creative way to buy time.


It's unethical and quite possibly illegal...if done exactly this way and definitely if done for this purpose....but still, hilarious in how effective I think it might actually turn out to be.

Hmm..... I'm thinking if a friend did work at your house and then you stiffed him..well, now that could bring a perfectly legitimate mechanics lien on the house title.


Of course, I honestly don't think tricks like this would end up doing more than buying time to the end. However, hell, if someone is staring the loss of their home and everything they have right in the face, buying *ANY* time could feel like a pardon from the Governor. I suppose it's not right to advocate such a thing........but I'll chuckle quietly at the idea and note the hypothetical and PURELY theoretical scenario there for mechanics liens.

Not that I'd ever suggest anything of the sort.... It's wrong to stiff a bank, after all.

edit on 11-8-2012 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)




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