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SECRETS of the Sun; DHS Report says NY New England Seattle worst places during Carrington event

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posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:42 PM
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www.oecd.org...



as for secrets, here's an odd one from NASA:

Did you know a solar flare can make your toilet stop working?



for other fascinating solar secrets including flare-ups... pls see this awesome nova doc:



and this HC one..





posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:46 PM
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Anyway you could give a quick summary of why those are bad places to be during a carrington event? On my phone and cant stream youtube on it. Thanks.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by NoNameBrand
 
I believe they're the most vulnerable because of the population density in those areas in conjunction with their reliance on the electrical grid.

The following photo demonstrates how a solar event comparable to the Carrington event would effect our electrical grid today when it does happen with current levels of preparedness in mind. Remember, it's not a question of if it can happen.




posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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the reason given (read the above linked Homeland Security report which is in PDF format) in summary, is
those 3 areas show the highest risk for social unrest based on their calculated Social Vulnerability Indexes.

might also want to read space weather expert Mike Hapgood's recent warning regarding coming solar maximum events:

www.ktuu.com...


What would the consequences be?
In the modern world, we use electricity for so many things. We require electrical power to pump water into people's houses and to pump the sewage away. [You can imagine] what could happen if the sewage systems aren't pumping stuff away. If you don't have power, you can't pump fuel into vehicles. If you don't have any fuel, traffic could come to a standstill.

Could the economy function? Most of the time you're using credit cards, debit cards or you'll be getting money out of an ATM. If you've lost the power, the computers in the bank that keep track of our money will have back-up power, but not the ATMs or the machines in the shops. So if you had a big power outage, it wouldn't be long before we'd be trying to find cash.

What can be done? The biggest step is to make more and more people aware of the issue, so they're thinking about it in the way they design things. That's the most critical part. I think it's also getting a better picture of these very violent past events. We'd like to find out more about the scope of those events. We have a lot of old data from past events that's on paper — in newspapers and so on — and we're busy trying to find ways to turn it into digital.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:02 PM
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Thanks for the replies. Got's to get myself a better smart (stupid) phone so i can watch video's on it.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by Sek82
I believe they're the most vulnerable because of the population density in those areas in conjunction with their reliance on the electrical grid.





yup, we could be plunged into the Dark Ages and even very brief power grid blackouts in the past, have shown alot of violence. looting, rapid chaotic breakdown of an already crippled/overloaded infrastructure in 'densest' American populations and it would likely a cascade effect pushing chaos into the lesser populated areas, nowhere spared pretty much well not in modern America with all its nuke reactors that good go offline, critical and without pumps etc how would they cool them?, for example.






posted on May, 7 2012 @ 05:46 PM
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just when was this supposed to happen,
exactly?



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 09:16 PM
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A Carrington event is a massive plasma solar flare – a ring of fire


The number of flares and sunspots fluctuate each year reaching a maximum every approximate eleven years. The Sun was due to reach a solar maximum in its 11 year cycle in 2011 or 2012. The current solar maximum was expected to be less severe than normal, however recent observations suggest that the maximum will now be delayed and occur in 2013 and be 40-50% stronger than the last maximum in 2001.





Carrington Event 1 in 8 chance of occuring in the next decade
Could such an event happen today and what would be its impact? It is likely that the electrical activity in polar regions could drive large currents in the electrical grids causing large-scale and possibly long-term damage.NASA appears to be sufficiently concerned that it is launching the “Solar Dynamics Observatory” which will study the sun in unprecedented detail. This should improve our understanding and ability to react to any threat.

It is not possible to predict with certainty when the next Carrington event will occur but a recent report based on modelling of the sun has determined a 12% probability that such an event will happen in the next decade. commend the foresight of those that warn us of the potential for harm from our normally friendly neighbor.


in 1859 we didnt have 104+ nuclear reactors in the US to worry about, nor 2013's coming 40-50% stronger solar flare activity.

in the event of power outage, they have 8 hours or less of backup power. thereafter, wiithout power there is no water for cooling, reactors reach critical, then meltdown, nuclear explosions spewing radioactive clouds of death throughout the sky, killing billions of people.





edit on 7-5-2012 by BiggerPicture because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 10:29 PM
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reply to post by BiggerPicture
 



Except that 8 hours of back up power, and no huge earthquake / tsunami to cause said destruction to those nuclear power plants, gives those engineers enough time to scram the reactor (fully insert the control rods). Once that's done (which takes seconds to minutes), the pumps only have to run long enough to continue cooling the reactor down. Since with the rods inserted all the way, the reactor is subcritical, no more heat is being produced, and the cooling water will stay below 200 degrees F without any pressure (being pumped).

so yah, loss of power grid? Sure.

Nuclear disaster because of a Carrignton event? I'm afraid that's fear mongering there......



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful
reply to post by BiggerPicture
 



Except that 8 hours of back up power, and no huge earthquake / tsunami to cause said destruction to those nuclear power plants, gives those engineers enough time to scram the reactor (fully insert the control rods). Once that's done (which takes seconds to minutes), the pumps only have to run long enough to continue cooling the reactor down. Since with the rods inserted all the way, the reactor is subcritical, no more heat is being produced, and the cooling water will stay below 200 degrees F without any pressure (being pumped).

so yah, loss of power grid? Sure.

Nuclear disaster because of a Carrignton event? I'm afraid that's fear mongering there......


Except the pumps won't work because they just got EMPed. Oh and that giant magnetic power turbine might just explode from the influx of solar radiation like the telegraph lines back in the day. How will the workers insert the rods with no working computer? How will they insert the rods with out working machines? Remember everything gets EMPed not just the grid.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by epsilon69

Originally posted by eriktheawful
reply to post by BiggerPicture
 



Except that 8 hours of back up power, and no huge earthquake / tsunami to cause said destruction to those nuclear power plants, gives those engineers enough time to scram the reactor (fully insert the control rods). Once that's done (which takes seconds to minutes), the pumps only have to run long enough to continue cooling the reactor down. Since with the rods inserted all the way, the reactor is subcritical, no more heat is being produced, and the cooling water will stay below 200 degrees F without any pressure (being pumped).

so yah, loss of power grid? Sure.

Nuclear disaster because of a Carrignton event? I'm afraid that's fear mongering there......


Except the pumps won't work because they just got EMPed. Oh and that giant magnetic power turbine might just explode from the influx of solar radiation like the telegraph lines back in the day. How will the workers insert the rods with no working computer? How will they insert the rods with out working machines? Remember everything gets EMPed not just the grid.


An EMP is far more severe than a solar storm. An emp produces both shortwave and longwave radiation. The shortwave radiation is what fries electronics, the longwave is what would harm high-voltage equipment.

In a solar storm, geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) concentrate on long conductors, such as power-lines, pipelines, etc... So the grid infrastructure attached to these conductors, such as transformers would be most at risk.

The pumps themselves would be unaffected as they run on diesel fuel. Now, nuclear power requires an external supply of electricity to the plant to keep operating, so more than likely they would have to shut the plant down. I'm sure, with the expertise of the plant workers, and with advanced warning from our satellites of a storm, we could avert disaster at most plants.

The computer wouldn't be 'fried' by a solar storm. In all likelihood, backup power would still allow for the main systems to function and operate the plant infrastructure. A coronal mass ejection and the associated geomagnetic storm will not 'fry' electronics outright, as an EMP blast might. They are two separate events.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 04:56 AM
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the backup generators have average of only 3 days of diesel to stay running

Is that enough time to shut down each nuclear reactors?

look at how long Fuku has been going haywire...

does US really think it could could keep ALL of its 104+ nuclear power plants under control in a global disaster level event? again look at how much risk and damage and irradiation from the planet Fukushima has been causing for over a year now. but apparently so, since US is so confident that even since Fukushima and its own reactor leaks in the northeast, it's installing even more nuke reactors!

what about the hundreds of other reactors all around the globe? a nuclear holocaust doesn't have to happen in the form of a mushroom cloud. since Chernobyl and now Fukushima and one look at US's nuke reactor arsenal, the likelihood of "multiple Fukushima's becomes just a matter of time when one nation has sooo many reactors to manage and is still installing more despite recent world lessons:

highboldtage.wordpress.com...



^ move over 9/11, EMP attack may be the next False Flag shock & awe event

who would likely use a weapon like that?"
alCIAda, duh

more on Carrington Events:

news.nationalgeographic.com...

quantumpranx.wordpress.com...

at least 27 of USA's 104+ nuke reactors are already chronically leaking - talk about not nippin things in the radioactive bud:



sheesh, cancer galore - it appears meltdown IS part of depop agenda



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 06:35 AM
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reply to post by BiggerPicture
 



does US really think it could could keep ALL of its 104+ nuclear power plants under control in a global disaster level event? again look at how much risk and damage and irradiation from the planet Fukushima has been causing for over a year now. but apparently so, since US is so confident that even since Fukushima and its own reactor leaks in the northeast, it's installing even more nuke reactors!


You must remember that the reason Fukushima failed so horribly is that the earthquake/tsunami combination knocked out the backup generators. An extreme solar storm might knock out the grid, but would leave the backup generators intact.

Now, this doesn't entirely rule out some isolated incidents where there are problems with the backups for other reasons, but I think nearly all of the nuclear power plants in the USA (and most likely the world) would be able to cope in such a disaster.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by epsilon69
 


I recommend you do a LITTLE more research in EMP's before you go declaring things like that.

Any solar event that has the potential to knock down the entire grid, especially on a global scale, will be detected ahead of time by us. This gives them even more time to get ready for it, and to make things secure at the plants so that what you describe does not happen.

Solar Flares and CME's are not like earthquakes. We have a good chunk of time before they hit. They are also not like Tsunamis in that we can see them coming and again, have a lot more time to prepare.

The reactors themselves have manual overrides, not dependent upon electronics or electricity. Those rods will be fully inserted within minutes.

The problem is keeping the spent fuel pool with cool water to keep them cooled down. However, unlike what happened over in Japan (IE the plant itself being damaged badly from both earthquakes and tsunamis), we're talking about a solar event, not something trying to physically destroy the building.

Electromechanical devices, such as motors used on pumps are made up of copper wire that is lamenated and wrapped around to make a armature and stators. They are not sensitive electronics like microchips which can be burned out very easily, whether they are on or off.
Most power companies know that if they remove power prior to a solar even on a massive scale that has the potential to induce damaging current, that many of their electromechanical and electrical devices (generators, motors, transformers, etc) that are hard or difficult to replace will go undamaged. It's while they are running that a solar even can induce extra current in them that blows them out.

The main difference between what happened in Japan and what could happen here is the disaster itself. Our nuclear plants will have plenty of heads up that something is coming, and structure integrity will not be compromised, allowing for repairs or modifications to cope with problems.

In Japan, their place was smashed to hell and back. It's like comparing apples and oranges.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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So I was reading through the DHS study .pdf that the OP posted, and I came across this gem discussing the psychological impacts of a solar storm taking down the grid. Apparently, in everyday life, absent the effects of a catastrophic solar storm, the public is "compliant with government instructions."




I don't know who authors these studies, but they must live in la-la land. People already have a "General loss of belief in government institutions," and there is already "widespread disregard for government instructions."
edit on 8-5-2012 by windowpane because: (no reason given)



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