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A Tribute to Native Americans

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posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:45 PM
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Originally posted by napayshni57
My property was once land the Cherokee's lived on. A small village set here. It is beautiful here. If you dig far enough down you find all manner of items used in their daily lives. I had someone approach me from the University saying they would like to come out and dig. I figured if they came out and dug things up they would take them. My thoughts are the items left behind when they were taken away without being able to take anything with them should stay where they left them.

What I find the worst is the idea's and way of life and belief systems that were forced on the Native Americans. Today we still are doing this same thing through out the world. I look at America today and say "This way is not the right way. Our thoughts are not the right ones. Our way of life is not right yet we think the world should be like us or they should change. If they will not change then we force them to change"

Change is not always good.

napayshni57
I don't blame you i wouldn't want them to dig there either they would probably just take it and sell what they found for a profit..

I look at America and almost cry our government is forcing us to change..I look all around just were i live and see people losing there homes and no jobs to be found..

And if they are lucky enough to be working there just living paycheck to paycheck..Your right Change is not always good..peace,sugarcookie1




posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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Originally posted by Unity_99
A wonderful thread. My two oldest sons are status native.


Thank you Unity
peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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Originally posted by Redwookieaz
Nice thread SugarCookie. SnF.

Spreading awareness of these atrocities is vital. Comprehension of our past can help mend, and create. It can create an evironment where knowledge of the past, prevents further genocidal behavior in our future.

Thanks again.


Redwookieaz
Thank you for posting.I hope this never happens again to anyone..I think spreading awareness is the first step..peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:58 PM
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Originally posted by Plugin
reply to post by CrimsonKapital
 


Not sure it was just for land.

They where just something seen as ''less'' IMO and since white had great power (compared = guns and so on) they where just seen as the buffalo's, which they killed off nearly as well.

A ''nice'' picture:

Bison skull pile:


Standing even proud next to them..
Reminds me about those soldiers who tortuded Iraqi's, standing PROUD, next to hem as well.
Scum, low life.. not even a right word for such people.

Not sure the world is much better today, it's just disguised.

The meat business = read money business, is just that, it's not even about animals.. just big $, as we..?
edit on 8-5-2012 by Plugin because: (no reason given)


Plugin..That picture gave me chills ugh..peace,sugarcookie1
edit on 8-5-2012 by sugarcookie1 because: none



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:42 PM
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I am a proud member of the Red Cliff Band Of Lake Superior Chippewas in NW Wisconsin near the Apostle Islands.
The thing that messed with me the most was going to a very private Lutheran school. They NEVER taught us about Indians and everything that happened, in fact the teachers would tell us Indians did not exist in America before Columbus came here. They literally just stopped short of saying there wasn't such a thing as Native Americans.
They always looked directly at me or my brother when they would say it to. They were hard core Lutherans. Im not sure what my parents were thinking by sending us there.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


halfoldman
I just finished the video you sent..Wow that was an eye opener ..Its a long video but well worth the time to watch i encourage everyone to watch this video..thanks again for posting it..sugarcookie1



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by MNnativeamer
I am a proud member of the Red Cliff Band Of Lake Superior Chippewas in NW Wisconsin near the Apostle Islands.
The thing that messed with me the most was going to a very private Lutheran school. They NEVER taught us about Indians and everything that happened, in fact the teachers would tell us Indians did not exist in America before Columbus came here. They literally just stopped short of saying there wasn't such a thing as Native Americans.
They always looked directly at me or my brother when they would say it to. They were hard core Lutherans. Im not sure what my parents were thinking by sending us there.


MNnativeamer
My 2 best friends are also Chippewas I'm in Minnesota..
I'm also Lutheran and i was never told about the Indians either ..I'm shocked your parents sent you to a private Lutheran school unless they decided it was a good place to get an education instead of public schools..I'm a lousy Lutheran i have to admit don't go along with 99% of what the church has to say..peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 02:12 AM
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I'm sure I'll get flamed for this, as usual, but:

many Native American tribes engaged in slash-and-burn agriculture, destroyed forests and grasslands, and wiped out entire animal populations (on the assumption that animals felled in a hunt would be reanimated in even larger numbers).

The widespread iconic image of the environmentalist Native American probably stems from a misinterpreted speech given by Chief Seattle. This speech, cited by Al Gore in the 90's, was mostly fabricated by a screen writer named Ted Perry.

Yes they may have been better stewards of the environment than those who came after them, but land was sacred to them more because their ancestors were buried there then because of an innate spirituality present in every living thing.

It's important for people to understand the atrocities committed against Native Americans, and there is no denying that Europeans committed genocide on the indigenous population when they got here. But it's equally important not to be swayed by propaganda.

I'm sure I've offended someone here. But I'm not sorry. Flame on!



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 02:21 AM
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Originally posted by ZeroReady
I'm sure I'll get flamed for this, as usual, but:

many Native American tribes engaged in slash-and-burn agriculture, destroyed forests and grasslands, and wiped out entire animal populations (on the assumption that animals felled in a hunt would be reanimated in even larger numbers).

The widespread iconic image of the environmentalist Native American probably stems from a misinterpreted speech given by Chief Seattle. This speech, cited by Al Gore in the 90's, was mostly fabricated by a screen writer named Ted Perry.

Yes they may have been better stewards of the environment than those who came after them, but land was sacred to them more because their ancestors were buried there then because of an innate spirituality present in every living thing.

It's important for people to understand the atrocities committed against Native Americans, and there is no denying that Europeans committed genocide on the indigenous population when they got here. But it's equally important not to be swayed by propaganda.

I'm sure I've offended someone here. But I'm not sorry. Flame on!


ZeroReady
I'm not going to flame you but others probably will..Do you have any proof of what your saying any links?
But id like for you to understand this is a tribute to the Native American Indians this thread was not posted to be a flame war and get people upset please keep that in mind..peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 02:34 AM
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I know, I don't want to start a flame war. But people whose only image of a Native American is the crying one from the anti-litter commercials need to be aware that they are people, just like you and me, with survival needs and desires for things that went beyond survival.

www.californiachaparral.com...


the relative impact of Native American burning in the coastal portions of California was probably quite significant. Ethnographic studies and other historical documents show that California Indians were responsible for extensive burning and type-conversion of chaparral and other shrublands to grasslands in order to increase favored game species, protect themselves from predators (the favored habitat of the California grizzly bear was chaparral), and as a tool of warfare. They almost certainly increased fire frequencies over what was naturally possible due to lightning. For example, in the 153,000 acre Santa Monica Mountain National Recreation Area only 2 lightning fires have been recorded over the past 25 years.


www.artdiamondblog.com...



After studying thousands of animal bones found in a garbage heap on the shores of San Francisco Bay, Broughton concluded that Native Americans living in an area where Emeryville is now located hunted several species to local extinction from 600 B.C. to A.D. 1300.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 02:38 AM
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I do understand the thread is a tribute to Native Americans. And if anyone reading this is afraid of being upset, then they probably wouldn't, or shouldn't be reading ATS. Most things on this site ought to make somebody upset. It's ok. Totally natural and valuable emotion and should not be suppressed.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 06:52 AM
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Excellent thread. The story of the American Indian
is tragic to say the least. My grandparents immigrated from
Middle Europe in the early 1900's and settled in Western Pa.
and added to the slave labor of the coal mines and mills.
Growing up in this area with an interest in the history of this
region I became more aware of the plight of the American Indian
with the influx of the European invasion that occured in the 1700
& 1800 hundreds. There is a most interesting book by the historian
Allan W. Eckert titled "This Dark and Bloody River" that chronicles
the settling of the Ohio Valley by the early pioneers and the westward
expansion of these early settlers. I highly recommend this read for anyone
who is interested in the early history of this country. It is a good foundation
in the basics that inevitably lead to the destruction of a proud and noble people.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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Originally posted by CrimsonKapital
reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


It is terrible what happened to these people, so many killed just for land. But I don't blame the current Americans this is something that happened over 100 years ago.

I do not blame anyone either, what is past, is past. As a child, my Grandpa and Grandma taught me to hate the Yankee, and everything Yankee, for what they did to their families during the Civil War. And...to hate the "Japs" because they bombed Pearl Harbor. Well, I understand the sentiment and all, but I don't hate anyone. Any race, any people, any religion. People need to stop hating each other.



posted on May, 9 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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Originally posted by 43LEO729
Excellent thread. The story of the American Indian
is tragic to say the least. My grandparents immigrated from
Middle Europe in the early 1900's and settled in Western Pa.
and added to the slave labor of the coal mines and mills.
Growing up in this area with an interest in the history of this
region I became more aware of the plight of the American Indian
with the influx of the European invasion that occured in the 1700
& 1800 hundreds. There is a most interesting book by the historian
Allan W. Eckert titled "This Dark and Bloody River" that chronicles
the settling of the Ohio Valley by the early pioneers and the westward
expansion of these early settlers. I highly recommend this read for anyone
who is interested in the early history of this country. It is a good foundation
in the basics that inevitably lead to the destruction of a proud and noble people.


Hi Leo
I know the conditions in the mills in the late 1800's and early 1900's were hell on earth. These men worked 12 hour shifts 7 days a week, and once every two weeks, worked a 24 hour shift. The unions finally came in decades later. There were no benefits, and in spite of 84 hour weeks, they made only enough money for poor housing and food. A lot of the wives took in boarders to help out. After Andrew Carnegie managed to defeat the early unions..

Another interesting thing was that they were members of the "Greek Catholic" church, which is an Eastern Rite Catholic .Church that is affiliated with Rome now, but for centuries, was geographically separated..

I will get the book your talking about and read it..also another good book is called Indians in Pennsylvania the book does a good job on explaining the impact of white settlers on the native tribes, particularly in terms of the impact on native economics, which drove local tribes to immediately abandon traditional weapons for guns..
Thanks for posting,peace,sugarcookie1





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