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A Tribute to Native Americans

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posted on May, 8 2012 @ 05:42 AM
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I am a member of the Lenni-Lenape tribe along the US East Coast and I'd just like to stop in and say thank you for this post as it truly warms my heart that we are not forgotten.

edit on 8-5-2012 by GreenEyedVixen because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 8 2012 @ 06:41 AM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


It is terrible what happened to these people, so many killed just for land. But I don't blame the current Americans this is something that happened over 100 years ago.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 07:38 AM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


cant forget the Hualapais
Fort Beale is right here in Kingman, Az


An army outpost was established at Camp Beale's Springs in 1871. A temporary reservation for about 600-650 Hualapais extended for a mile around the fort.



Edgar Walema tells the story in these words: "The Army was ordered to round up all 'hostile' Indians. Apparently every man, woman, and child was hostile, for they took all of them. They were all collected and marched. You know of Trail of Tears' of the Cherokees, and the Navajo 'Long Walk", but this also happened in the state of Arizona.


this is a tragic topic every American who values their rights should be aware of & actively correcting & healing..

peace...
edit on 8-5-2012 by reeferman because: links..



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by CrimsonKapital
 


I, as a native, know that the current generations of white Americans aren't responsible for what happened to my people, but they sure are profiting from it.

Our peaceful nature was taken advantage of, and now people claim we were savages and that we started it.

It is indeed a shame



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 08:13 AM
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It's always so pathetic when people say this country is the brightest and greatest, when really were no different from Germany, Cambodia, or Russia when it comes to Mass Genocide and Big Brother. We murdered 16 million Indians, for what? We turned this great beautiful land into a god damn shopping mall. That's all it is, human farming. The only reason you are worth something, is the fact that you are a drone in this consumer cycle. We are the only thing that keeps this whole system of bull# together.

If we can just finally stop voting, stop relying on the rigged system, we can finally be set free. I would rather live 40 years as an Indian then live in this # filled fake Utopia.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 08:21 AM
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Originally posted by dorkfish87
reply to post by CrimsonKapital
 


I, as a native, know that the current generations of white Americans aren't responsible for what happened to my people, but they sure are profiting from it.

Our peaceful nature was taken advantage of, and now people claim we were savages and that we started it.

It is indeed a shame


It is very sad that so many died, I must be honest and say that I don't know a lot about the American Indians but this thread has been a great education for me.
I must also admit, here in Australia we had our own fair share of atrocities but it is nowhere near as terrible as what happened to your people. Millions were killed in America, in Australia about 20 thousand Aborigines were killed so it is no where near that level.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 08:24 AM
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Originally posted by dorkfish87
reply to post by CrimsonKapital
 


I, as a native, know that the current generations of white Americans aren't responsible for what happened to my people, but they sure are profiting from it.

Our peaceful nature was taken advantage of, and now people claim we were savages and that we started it.

It is indeed a shame



"they" are profiting- what just the "whites", not the latinos, blacks, east asians, and yes, native americans, but no, just whites

Gotta love the unintentional racism over this nonsense



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 09:32 AM
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My property was once land the Cherokee's lived on. A small village set here. It is beautiful here. If you dig far enough down you find all manner of items used in their daily lives. I had someone approach me from the University saying they would like to come out and dig. I figured if they came out and dug things up they would take them. My thoughts are the items left behind when they were taken away without being able to take anything with them should stay where they left them.

What I find the worst is the idea's and way of life and belief systems that were forced on the Native Americans. Today we still are doing this same thing through out the world. I look at America today and say "This way is not the right way. Our thoughts are not the right ones. Our way of life is not right yet we think the world should be like us or they should change. If they will not change then we force them to change"

Change is not always good.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by sugarcookie1
Is anyone on ATS thats Native American ?


I was born here the same as any member of any tribe.
That doesn't qualify me to some but I do have NA blood: My mother's mother was half Chickasaw and somewhere back on my fathers side is Mohawk.

I would like to add that Native Americans do not hold a monopoly on spirituality and nature. Any of us can enjoy the same with the right attitude and experiences. Going to a sweatlodge does not make one spiritual, nor does smoking a peace pipe.
In fact, many Native Americans have completely lost that connection with the Earth and are just as "civilized" as any white person.
Don't let the fact that you are not of Native American descent keep you from experiencing the spiritual aspects of Nature, it's everyone's birthright - even those born in the largest of cities.

The real tragedy of the history of the Native Americans is how being removed from their lands took everything from them - their homes, their connection with the ancestors, their connection with the Earth. The Cherokee who were removed from North Carolina did not know how to live in the land called Oklahoma - it had different plants, animals, soil, weather. Everything they knew about how to live had to abandoned and relearned from scratch.
It's nothing like say if I were to move from Virginia to California. There would still be grocery stores, auto mechanics, doctors, the same medicines. The people and the scenery might feel a little different but that's about all. When native tribes moved they lost a connection that is as deep as family. This is a hard concept to try to convey to modern folks.
edit on 8-5-2012 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 11:10 AM
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A wonderful thread. My two oldest sons are status native.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


A thousand stars to you for that post!



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 11:43 AM
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I wanted to post this lengthy but worthwhile documentary called The Canary Effect.

The film was first shown at a festival in 2006, and explored issues into contemporary times, whereas most films leave the 20th century history of forced sterilization and cultural genocide by the missionaries unexamined.
Corrupt funding, inconsistent casino policies, double-speak on self determination, school-shootings and massive rates of suicide are addressed, and it ends with powerful anti-war sentiments.
It may be controversial in parts, even amongst Native Americans.

Quite an eye-opener for a South African, when we were once called the "biggest racists" on earth, although at least our black population never fell under 80 percent, and before the ANC take-over the average life-expectancy was in the mid sixties.

Although the US native population was kept at 0.8 percent, it's worth examining what kind of policies kept it that way, and how it still does, and how a country with such noble ideals could allow a people to be treated so poorly.




posted on May, 8 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by dullb0y
I am a member of the eastern band of cherokee indians and thank you for the thread this is my first post though so hello ats from oklahoma


dullb0y
Thank you for posting..And a warm welcome to ATS
peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by GreenEyedVixen

I am a member of the Lenni-Lenape tribe along the US East Coast and I'd just like to stop in and say thank you for this post as it truly warms my heart that we are not forgotten.

edit on 8-5-2012 by GreenEyedVixen because: (no reason given)


GreenEyedVixen
Thank you so much for posting and I'm glad you liked the thread..peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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Nice thread SugarCookie. SnF.

Spreading awareness of these atrocities is vital. Comprehension of our past can help mend, and create. It can create an evironment where knowledge of the past, prevents further genocidal behavior in our future.

Thanks again.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by reeferman
reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


cant forget the Hualapais
Fort Beale is right here in Kingman, Az


An army outpost was established at Camp Beale's Springs in 1871. A temporary reservation for about 600-650 Hualapais extended for a mile around the fort.



Edgar Walema tells the story in these words: "The Army was ordered to round up all 'hostile' Indians. Apparently every man, woman, and child was hostile, for they took all of them. They were all collected and marched. You know of Trail of Tears' of the Cherokees, and the Navajo 'Long Walk", but this also happened in the state of Arizona.


this is a tragic topic every American who values their rights should be aware of & actively correcting & healing..

peace...
edit on 8-5-2012 by reeferman because: links..


reeferman
In centuries past, American Indians faced the invasion of other cultures that forced their removal from the fertile lands of their ancestors.
Promises were made by the invaders, which resulted in broken treaties. As a result, many Native American tribes were moved to reservations to isolate them, control them and to make them more "civilized" in the eyes of the conquerors.

The isolation still exists today when i go to the reservation to see my friends its all around me..

Tribes continue to battle against destructive forces. Forces like poverty, substance abuse and suicide to name a few, continually strike this segment of the population to a greater degree than most other Americans.

I agree with you..tragic topic every American who values their rights should be aware of & actively correcting & healing..
peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:15 PM
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Originally posted by Kang69
It's always so pathetic when people say this country is the brightest and greatest, when really were no different from Germany, Cambodia, or Russia when it comes to Mass Genocide and Big Brother. We murdered 16 million Indians, for what? We turned this great beautiful land into a god damn shopping mall. That's all it is, human farming. The only reason you are worth something, is the fact that you are a drone in this consumer cycle. We are the only thing that keeps this whole system of bull# together.

If we can just finally stop voting, stop relying on the rigged system, we can finally be set free. I would rather live 40 years as an Indian then live in this # filled fake Utopia.



Kang69
I agree with you..I would rather live 40 years as an Indian then live in this # filled fake Utopia.
peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals

Originally posted by sugarcookie1
Is anyone on ATS thats Native American ?


I was born here the same as any member of any tribe.
That doesn't qualify me to some but I do have NA blood: My mother's mother was half Chickasaw and somewhere back on my fathers side is Mohawk.

I would like to add that Native Americans do not hold a monopoly on spirituality and nature. Any of us can enjoy the same with the right attitude and experiences. Going to a sweatlodge does not make one spiritual, nor does smoking a peace pipe.
In fact, many Native Americans have completely lost that connection with the Earth and are just as "civilized" as any white person.
Don't let the fact that you are not of Native American descent keep you from experiencing the spiritual aspects of Nature, it's everyone's birthright - even those born in the largest of cities.

The real tragedy of the history of the Native Americans is how being removed from their lands took everything from them - their homes, their connection with the ancestors, their connection with the Earth. The Cherokee who were removed from North Carolina did not know how to live in the land called Oklahoma - it had different plants, animals, soil, weather. Everything they knew about how to live had to abandoned and relearned from scratch.
It's nothing like say if I were to move from Virginia to California. There would still be grocery stores, auto mechanics, doctors, the same medicines. The people and the scenery might feel a little different but that's about all. When native tribes moved they lost a connection that is as deep as family. This is a hard concept to try to convey to modern folks.
edit on 8-5-2012 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)


I am not of Native American descent but i do love there culture ..And i do agree you don't have to be Native American to enjoy being spiritual ..

I own a farm and work the land plus raise cattle for a living..I love the feeling of being close to mother earth and all it has to offer..I feel very fortunate to be able to do something i love everyday of my life

I'm of Swedish decent most all of my relatives are also farmers but I'm one of the rare few of this generation still doing this..peace,sugarcookie1



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by CrimsonKapital
 


Not sure it was just for land.

They where just something seen as ''less'' IMO and since white had great power (compared = guns and so on) they where just seen as the buffalo's, which they killed off nearly as well.

A ''nice'' picture:

Bison skull pile:


Standing even proud next to them..
Reminds me about those soldiers who tortuded Iraqi's, standing PROUD, next to hem as well.
Scum, low life.. not even a right word for such people.

Not sure the world is much better today, it's just disguised.

The meat business = read money business, is just that, it's not even about animals.. just big $, as we..?
edit on 8-5-2012 by Plugin because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 


halfoldman
Thank you for posting..Tonight i will watch the video and thanks for posting it also..peace,sugarcookie1





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