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Man grows 1,360-acre forest in India...by himself

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posted on May, 2 2012 @ 04:54 AM
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That was an EPIC accomplishment/undertaking by "MOLAI" !
That name should be known/repeated....seriously.
He, single handedly planted a forest of more that 1,000 acres!? In his next life, may he deserve all the comfort/happiness he can stand.




posted on May, 2 2012 @ 05:51 AM
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Incredible. How can I contact this guy?



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 06:00 AM
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66 Flags and barely 2 pages?

This man is a great example we should all learn from. Not only from his dedication, but his empathy for all living beings, and his incredible work ethic. I cannot imagine how much hard work, the amount of hours, and back breaking labor that must of have taken to get a forest like that.
He created an entire ecosystem out of nothing! Just incredible



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 06:45 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I much prefer Nature and Wildlife to Industrial Complexes.... just look at any major City from above and you will see that it mostly looks ugly!!



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 08:25 AM
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Originally posted by stanguilles7

Originally posted by jude11


Even if it worked out to 1 acre per person that we planted....That's a small scale project that many (not all) could attempt and actually carry out.


No matter where you live, plant a few native plants every year. Especially ones that produce food or medicine for people. Learning proper location, etc, is important, but just getting started is the most important.

Study the land. Observe the cycles. Get in touch with native nurseries in your area. Find out what they recommend to plant. A small investment of eve just $20 a year and some of your time can begin to pay off quite quickly.

There is a lot of evidence that the entire Amazon Rainforest is actually a large, distended food forest from peoples now amost entirely decimated. Humans CAN tend the earth for the better.
edit on 1-5-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)


Amazing find Op and it brings to mind what is quoted above about the Amazon it is man made. www.bbc.co.uk... docu is called Unatural Histories Amazon



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 08:38 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 


WE CAN DO ANYTHING.


HUMANITY DOESN'T EVEN NEED TO WORK TOGETHER, this ONE guy.

this ONE LALALAING GUY.


he planeted a FARST!!!! O_O mind = BLOWN.



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 09:21 AM
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Heard this story today for the first time and did some search. This is the picture of the man


He's such an unassuming guy, but he's made such a massive difference to the area he lives in. The article has some truth in it when it says "Had he been in any other country, he would have been made a hero."



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 09:22 AM
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Plants were here before us, and will be here long after us. Time to show them some respect!
It's refreshing to hear the human species doing this planet a favour for once, rather than bringing it closer to destruction. Thank you!



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 09:30 AM
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This is awesome, I am totally amazed wow



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 09:44 AM
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actually ... its not as hard work as many of you *may* believe.


you could ALL plant trees and gardens wherever you are .... its quite enjoyable to watch nature respond to your efforts. try it sometime.



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 09:44 AM
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Originally posted by Ek Bharatiya
Heard this story today for the first time and did some search. This is the picture of the man


He's such an unassuming guy, but he's made such a massive difference to the area he lives in. The article has some truth in it when it says "Had he been in any other country, he would have been made a hero."


I agree. There is some truth to it.

But I can't keep myself from pondering what would happen to someone here in the US if they tried this. That is, someone that hasn't purchased a thousand acres, paid for licensing, hired locals to tend the area, etc.

Unfortunately, it is likely only the excessively wealthy could attempt such a project. If each one of us just did a little bit, on land we have permission to work, then we could make a difference.

But if I drove out to say, Nevada, went into one of the more desolate places that has at least some rainfall or underground water sources (theory), and began a similar project, it would only be a matter of time before some official would politely ask that I stop, or else.

Am I a cynic? Or just realistic?

On topic, this man should at least be nominated for the Nobel.



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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Guy's a legend!
I certain couldn't undertake something so massive. Instead I'm going to buy a some large bags of mixed wildflower seed's and throw them on any barren verges I can find to help the bee's and critters. So many road verges going to waste. If they don't take and the birds eat them, or they get cut tough...Least I'm trying.



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 10:21 AM
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i for one believe man can do just about anything if he sets his heart to do it - this is truly an amazing example putting one foot in front of the other in the journey of a 1000 miles - evidently he believed in himself - he had an incredible belief system - he was very disciplined - and soon his reality started taking shape according to his belief - this is the greatest evidence that something can be done when we see others do something as remarkable as this human being -

this man never took his eyes off his goal - he never looked to the right or to the left - his eyes were steadfast on his goal!


We can do anything we want to if we stick to it long enough. Helen Keller Read more at www.brainyquote.com...

Helen Keller
Read more at www.brainyquote.com...


great reminder!
edit on 2-5-2012 by musselwhite because: (no reason given)
edit on 2-5-2012 by musselwhite because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 10:41 AM
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Thread of the year so far!

I'm inspired! Recently i have been pulling up baby Ash Tree's that have littered my garden, but now i'm going to pot them all and plant them in the most desolate run down part of town!



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 11:05 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 

I have been contemplating growing a bamboo forest in my back yard...it is almost an acre and about 75% wooded but I can see the warehouses on the road behind me and I really need to block those out and also their parking lots drain into my back yard when it rains or the snow melts so I thought that would help soak up some of that water...regardless, bravo to this man, I wish I had a jungle/ecosystem that I said I grew and say I had supplied a home for hundreds or hundreds of thousands of creatures.



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by Wheelindiehl
reply to post by jude11
 

I have been contemplating growing a bamboo forest in my back yard...it is almost an acre and about 75% wooded but I can see the warehouses on the road behind me and I really need to block those out and also their parking lots drain into my back yard when it rains or the snow melts so I thought that would help soak up some of that water...regardless, bravo to this man, I wish I had a jungle/ecosystem that I said I grew and say I had supplied a home for hundreds or hundreds of thousands of creatures.
i used to wish for lots of things but wishing never did anything but bring me down and frustrate me - the things that lifted me up was to see what i had accomplished at the end of a day -



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 11:38 AM
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Trying to look this forest up on google maps, but don't know what city it's in.

Anyone?



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by henryleo
reply to post by stanguilles7
 


Could you please post some links to info about the Amazon being a former food forest!
I am extremely intrigued! and I am sure others here would love to read about it as well
Off to google about this

thank you!


Sure,

There's an EXCELLENT book called "1491" by Charles C Mann that covers the topic, and shows the extent to which both N. And S. America were actively cultivated by 'natives'. It's a long read, but you can just read the chapters on the Amazon if you want.



. New evidence of both the extent of the population and its agricultural advancement leads to a remarkable conjecture: the Amazon rain forest may be largely a human artifact...

Planting their orchards, the first Amazonians transformed large swaths of the river basin into something more pleasing to human beings. In a widely cited article from 1989, William Balée, the Tulane anthropologist, cautiously estimated that about 12 percent of the nonflooded Amazon forest was of anthropogenic origin—directly or indirectly created by human beings. In some circles this is now seen as a conservative position. "I basically think it's all human-created," Clement told me in Brazil. He argues that Indians changed the assortment and density of species throughout the region. So does Clark Erickson, the University of Pennsylvania archaeologist, who told me in Bolivia that the lowland tropical forests of South America are among the finest works of art on the planet. "Some of my colleagues would say that's pretty radical," he said, smiling mischievously. According to Peter Stahl, an anthropologist at the State University of New York at Binghamton, "lots" of botanists believe that "what the eco-imagery would like to picture as a pristine, untouched Urwelt [primeval world] in fact has been managed by people for millennia." The phrase "built environment," Erickson says, "applies to most, if not all, Neotropical landscapes."

"Landscape" in this case is meant exactly—Amazonian Indians literally created the ground beneath their feet. According to William I. Woods, a soil geographer at Southern Illinois University, ecologists' claims about terrible Amazonian land were based on very little data. In the late 1990s Woods and others began careful measurements in the lower Amazon. They indeed found lots of inhospitable terrain. But they also discovered swaths of terra preta—rich, fertile "black earth" that anthropologists increasingly believe was created by human beings.


cogweb.ucla.edu...


www.theatlantic.com...

www.amazon.com...

A MUST READ^^^^ for anyone interested in sustainable food production.
edit on 2-5-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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This is amazing..if one person can do all of this..think of what we could all do if we put our mind to it!!!
This story made my morning!



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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Great thread

What an amazing man.
Makes me think we should have a Replant the earth day.





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