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Are the stars in the sky brighter and more clear to you now than years back?

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posted on May, 1 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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I searched for a while and didn't see anybody with this question, so I figured I'd ask. I'm certain it isn't a "conspiracy" so I didn't want to put it in one of those forums, figured that Science would probably be the closest.

I have lived in Vegas since '05, and been watching and enjoying the stars and night sky for a long, long time like a lot of us. Here's my question, and it is more of just a check to see if it is just me, or is this something that others notice as well - It seems to me that just in the last year or so, the stars in the sky are noticeably clearer and brighter than they have been in the past. Has anybody else noticed this?

It may be hard to measure, but I asked my wife the same question while looking up in awe one night. She said to me, "Actually, YES!" She said she thought she was just the only one that thought so and thought nothing more of it. But, is it more than just me and her?

You see, in Vegas there is a TON of light pollution. Hell, that huge Luxor light beam alone is capable of wiping out many stars from one's night vision. But with or without that much light pollution, the sky seems crisp, clear, much brighter overall.

The ONLY hypothesis (ok, Wild-ass guess I mean) is, what about that "photon belt" thing that we're supposed to be around or in? Or maybe some other celestial factor?

Your thoughts?
edit on 1-5-2012 by fourthmeal because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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I'm not too sure. I'm only 3 hours away in Hesperia up in the high desert & on a clear night the stars are bigger & brighter than ever & Venus is so bright & luminous, I pause every night & look up & take in its beauty.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:08 AM
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Maybe it's because the ozone layer is thinning?
It's probably here on earth because I don't think all the stars in the galaxy are suddenly becoming brighter.
Or maybe that's not such a strange idea after all, I mean our sun is also becoming brighter..



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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Here in Britain, despite the current wet weather, we are actually in the midst of the driest period in some time. We have been nineteen months without steady rain, and there have been very few clouds in the sky when compared with previous years. This has certainly resulted in brighter skies at night in my opinion.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by fourthmeal
 


You answered your own question, light pollution. Where you are at now must have less light pollution, and yes the sky looks clearer and starts look brighter.
edit on 1-5-2012 by Tbrooks76 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:15 AM
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Something I've noticed, is the magnitude of Procyon, Capella, Pollux and Venus. You can compare the data with Stellarium, and what you see in tonight's sky.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:20 AM
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Yes. I have noticed that the stars in the night sky appear to have grown more luminous over the last several years.
I have brought this, along with other noticeable differences, to the attention of others. They either did not, do not notice this or rather do not care.

While I have nothing to offer as a possible explanation. I will add that I have also noticed an increased clarity in my ocular perceptibility at night.


I have read some pointing out that are finally noticing the brighter stars appearing to twinkle now, 'twinkle twinkle little star', I attribute the new acknowledgement of others to the stars becoming brighter.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by fourthmeal
 


Actually I have to admit they are, and agree with the OP in regard to brightness or magnitude....

I am in southern Australia and fairly close to a main city, about 30km or 60M approx. Recently (last 6-12 months) I have noticed an increase in luminosity in the sky and from the stars and certain planets...

Kinda odd I guess but hey, it's great for the telescope


Perhaps it's just atmospheric conditions?





edit on 1-5-2012 by Havick007 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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No, in fact the skies have been getting decidedly less clear, and most stars are totally not visible at all, and it gets slowly worse every year.

I could see 100 times more 20 years ago,, at least.

Never heard of people seeing more, and brighter stars till this post...only heard of people seeing nothing at all, really.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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I've had the same thought as well, on clear nights, in the last two years or so. The apparent brightness of Venus these days, and less recently Jupiter, is partly due to factors of proximity (perigee), but for me at least, the phenomenon goes further.

I recall a thread or two in these forums about twinkling stars -- red, green blue alternating in no apparent pattern -- being mistaken or suspected for non-natural objects, and so on. Thinking to the child's rhyme "Twinkle twinkle little star", it is obvious that such a sight has incited wonder for many generations. But I don't ever recall such twinking stars having such vivid colors, or seeming so bright, as a child.

I also have noticed that, on clear nights, the difference in color among stars seems clearer than before. This also makes me wonder if there is some change in our atmosphere. A previous poster mentioned the ozone layer. One speculation in the "chemtrails" vein of discussion is that the ozone layer is thinner than ever, worse off than the public has been told, hence the need to protect us (and other the ecosphere generally) from dangerous doses of UV radiation.

Maybe, but even if that were so, I don't know that a reduced ozone layer would have any effect on the visibility of stars at night.

The only explanation for this apparent increase in brightness that I could arrive at, in my own case, is the gradual deterioration of my vision. I need reading glasses, 1.5x strength, is all. However after doing any work that requires extra magnification (like fixing electronics, or repairing small broken items, using mounted magnifying glass,etc), for a time thereafter there is some blurring of the stars in my vision, due to some distortion, or hardening of the cornea, that I assume comes from age. That blurring fades after a while -- but it does make the stars appear larger (and blurrier) if not brighter. Staring at computer screen for hours could cause the same effect, as one ages, one's focus for distant objects might take some time to recover, so jumping up from the computer and heading outside to stargaze could cause stars to appear somewhat blurrier, than if one's eyes had had time to adjust. This effect, if any, would be less noticeable or nil, if one were simply heading outside into daylight. Viewing stars on a dark sky would accentuate it, making the usually unnoticeable noticeable.

Even so, I concur with the OP's suspicion: the stars do look brighter these days. It takes my breath away, inducing wonder as great as anything I had as a child.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:43 AM
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Originally posted by GrinchNoMore
No, in fact the skies have been getting decidedly less clear, and most stars are totally not visible at all, and it gets slowly worse every year.

I could see 100 times more 20 years ago,, at least.

Never heard of people seeing more, and brighter stars till this post...only heard of people seeing nothing at all, really.


Same here. I use to see the galactic center streaking across the night sky 15 or so years ago, now I can only see it after a hurricane blows away all the chemtrail residue. After hurricane Irene, the skies here were crystal clear, dim stars were visible, reminded me of the good old days.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by fourthmeal
 




i have the answer for your mystery...

are you ready?....

what you are noticing as "brighter stars" .... AREN'T in fact stars...

nope... what you are seeing is satellites ... plain and simple... the REAL stars are the still the very faintly lit dots in the sky, the new bright star looking objects that occupy our night sky are nothing more than satellites, thousands of them to be exact, they appear to be bright like stars because they are much closer to our orbit

sorry to crush you dreams



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:52 AM
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Originally posted by k1k1to
reply to post by fourthmeal
 




i have the answer for your mystery...

are you ready?....

what you are noticing as "brighter stars" .... AREN'T in fact stars...

nope... what you are seeing is satellites ... plain and simple... the REAL stars are the still the very faintly lit dots in the sky, the new bright star looking objects that occupy our night sky are nothing more than satellites, thousands of them to be exact, they appear to be bright like stars because they are much closer to our orbit

sorry to crush you dreams


you beat me to it, thats exactly what i was going to say.

im surprised that no one else has thought logically that what they are seeing is nothing more than satellites, it even explains why they are becoming more common throughout the last couple of years ... thats because we started to mass produce and launch satellites not that long ago, thus explaining the all of a sudden influx of "bigger and brighter stars"..

geez what happened to common sense?



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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Originally posted by Tbrooks76
reply to post by fourthmeal
 


You answered your own question, light pollution. Where you are at now must have less light pollution, and yes the sky looks clearer and starts look brighter.
edit on 1-5-2012 by Tbrooks76 because: (no reason given)


It is a valid possibility but I've been in the same place since 05 till now, and have not moved except across the way by about 100 yards (to a house that was better than mine for the same price during the financial meltdown.)

Believe me, I would not have brought it up had I not removed location from the list of possibilities.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by ooYODAoo

Originally posted by k1k1to
reply to post by fourthmeal
 




i have the answer for your mystery...

are you ready?....

what you are noticing as "brighter stars" .... AREN'T in fact stars...

nope... what you are seeing is satellites ... plain and simple... the REAL stars are the still the very faintly lit dots in the sky, the new bright star looking objects that occupy our night sky are nothing more than satellites, thousands of them to be exact, they appear to be bright like stars because they are much closer to our orbit

sorry to crush you dreams


you beat me to it, thats exactly what i was going to say.

im surprised that no one else has thought logically that what they are seeing is nothing more than satellites, it even explains why they are becoming more common throughout the last couple of years ... thats because we started to mass produce and launch satellites not that long ago, thus explaining the all of a sudden influx of "bigger and brighter stars"..

geez what happened to common sense?


This is also a possibility but I was gauging my view of star brightness via the constellations. I don't think satellites have conjured up constellation organization. Thank you for posting the satellite possibility though, that is something to consider if one is not using constellations as a guide.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by Namdru
I've had the same thought as well, on clear nights, in the last two years or so. The apparent brightness of Venus these days, and less recently Jupiter, is partly due to factors of proximity (perigee), but for me at least, the phenomenon goes further.

I recall a thread or two in these forums about twinkling stars -- red, green blue alternating in no apparent pattern -- being mistaken or suspected for non-natural objects, and so on. Thinking to the child's rhyme "Twinkle twinkle little star", it is obvious that such a sight has incited wonder for many generations. But I don't ever recall such twinking stars having such vivid colors, or seeming so bright, as a child.

I also have noticed that, on clear nights, the difference in color among stars seems clearer than before. This also makes me wonder if there is some change in our atmosphere. A previous poster mentioned the ozone layer. One speculation in the "chemtrails" vein of discussion is that the ozone layer is thinner than ever, worse off than the public has been told, hence the need to protect us (and other the ecosphere generally) from dangerous doses of UV radiation.

Maybe, but even if that were so, I don't know that a reduced ozone layer would have any effect on the visibility of stars at night.

The only explanation for this apparent increase in brightness that I could arrive at, in my own case, is the gradual deterioration of my vision. I need reading glasses, 1.5x strength, is all. However after doing any work that requires extra magnification (like fixing electronics, or repairing small broken items, using mounted magnifying glass,etc), for a time thereafter there is some blurring of the stars in my vision, due to some distortion, or hardening of the cornea, that I assume comes from age. That blurring fades after a while -- but it does make the stars appear larger (and blurrier) if not brighter. Staring at computer screen for hours could cause the same effect, as one ages, one's focus for distant objects might take some time to recover, so jumping up from the computer and heading outside to stargaze could cause stars to appear somewhat blurrier, than if one's eyes had had time to adjust. This effect, if any, would be less noticeable or nil, if one were simply heading outside into daylight. Viewing stars on a dark sky would accentuate it, making the usually unnoticeable noticeable.

Even so, I concur with the OP's suspicion: the stars do look brighter these days. It takes my breath away, inducing wonder as great as anything I had as a child.


I thought about it being my vision, and that in fact may be part of it. I have worn contacts since I was a teen, and I recently switched to a daily disposable so I do see slightly better than if I leave a contact for a few weeks before switching. However, my wife has really great vision and said the same, so I questioned this. Also, the notice of me having better contacts and me noticing the star's brightness do not coincide. I only recently switched, but I have noticed the brightness since a year or so ago. At first a passing fascination as I put the car up for the night, but lately it is more like, "was it really this bright?"

Thanks for your post!



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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Well, what I noticed is that the sky is becoming much clearer and the stars indeed somehow brighter... though I have the impression that I could see a lot more 15 years ago and I've always watched the sky at darkness, doesn't matter at which time, I just love to watch stars and watch out for meteors.
edit on 1-5-2012 by Kemal because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 12:12 PM
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Are creating polls a possibility here? I wonder what the ratio really is.

Please let me know.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by GrinchNoMore
No, in fact the skies have been getting decidedly less clear, and most stars are totally not visible at all, and it gets slowly worse every year.

I could see 100 times more 20 years ago,, at least.

Never heard of people seeing more, and brighter stars till this post...only heard of people seeing nothing at all, really.


Sadly that has been my experience as well..general pollution/air traffic rising and the building of a god forsaken waste burning kiln near where I live has seen to that.
I am lucky if I get one "clear"night in a month in North Wales,and even then its nothing compared to a proper clear night in the Himalayas or the Sahara..

A good one for folks to try is shine a high powered torch up in the sky in the night time and see how many particles are in the beam.
(more particles=less visibility)
For me its billions-but in a truly clear environment you should only see the odd particle or two per 10 seconds in the beam of your torch.
Try it.

edit on 1/5/2012 by Silcone Synapse because: sp



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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you really should see the Luxor like I mentioned in my original post.

The most powerful flashlight ever, pointed straight up!


Originally posted by Silcone Synapse

Originally posted by GrinchNoMore
No, in fact the skies have been getting decidedly less clear, and most stars are totally not visible at all, and it gets slowly worse every year.

I could see 100 times more 20 years ago,, at least.

Never heard of people seeing more, and brighter stars till this post...only heard of people seeing nothing at all, really.


Sadly that has been my experience as well..general pollution/air traffic rising and the building of a god forsaken waste burning kiln near where I live has seen to that.
I am lucky if I get one "clear"night in a month in North Wales,and even then its nothing compared to a proper clear night in the Himalayas or the Sahara..

A good one for folks to try is shine a high powered torch up in the sky in the night time and see how many particles are in the beam.
(more particles=less visibility)
For me its billions-but in a truly clear environment you should only see the odd particle or two per 10 seconds in the beam of your torch.
Try it.

edit on 1/5/2012 by Silcone Synapse because: sp



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