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FDA to let patients buy prescriptions over-the-counter?

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posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 05:56 PM
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Buy prescription with no script?



In a move that could help the government trim its burgeoning health care costs, the Food and Drug Administration may soon permit Americans to obtain some drugs used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes without obtaining a prescription.

The FDA says over-the-counter distribution would let patients get drugs for many common conditions without the time and expense of visiting a doctor, but medical providers call the change medically unsound and note that it also may mean that insurance no longer will pay for the drugs.


Oh this is wonderful. Obamacare at it's finest I guess. I can't afford the copays on my meds as it is, last thing I need it to pay for it completely out of pocket. This is one way to kill off people and keep the rest poorer.





posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Oh this is wonderful. Obamacare at it's finest I guess. I can't afford the copays on my meds as it is, last thing I need it to pay for it completely out of pocket. This is one way to kill off people and keep the rest poorer.


Don't assume yet. I already pay less for generics than the co-pay. In other words, not having insurance is cheaper than having insurance. Generics for common stuff like blood pressure are very likely the targets here. Not having to go through a doctor will make these drugs vastly cheaper. Until you see statistics otherwise, don't jump to conclusions here.
edit on 4/30/2012 by schuyler because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:04 PM
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All this shows is the drug companies influence on government.

Imagine it people now they can directly sell you what ever drug they want with out the pesky doctors getting involved...



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:09 PM
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So we're mad when the government wants to meddle in our lives. And now we're mad when they take some of that meddling away.

Some people are never happy.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler

Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Oh this is wonderful. Obamacare at it's finest I guess. I can't afford the copays on my meds as it is, last thing I need it to pay for it completely out of pocket. This is one way to kill off people and keep the rest poorer.


Don't assume yet. I already pay less for generics than the co-pay. In other words, not having insurance is cheaper than having insurance. Generics for common stuff like blood pressure are very likely the targets here. Not having to go through a doctor will make these drugs vastly cheaper. Until you see statistics otherwise, don't jump to conclusions here.
edit on 4/30/2012 by schuyler because: (no reason given)


Agreed 100%. I don't think this is some sort of hidden agenda to kill people off... drugs are MUCH cheaper if you DON'T use your insurance. When I was on birth control I had insurance. I discovered that it was $10 cheaper to buy it without! Now I don't have insurance, so I pay for prescriptions without insurance. They generally range from $8-$30. I think by doing this, it is ultimately helping those who can't afford insurance premiums, but can still scrounge up the money they need for their medications.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:26 PM
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Originally posted by benrl
All this shows is the drug companies influence on government.

Imagine it people now they can directly sell you what ever drug they want with out the pesky doctors getting involved...


Personally I'm sick of being REQUIRED to go to the doctor when I need a simple medication. This will be good for me and my kids.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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A lot of folks don't know this, but it's true. If your doctor prescribes an over the counter medication, have him or her write you a prescription. Even though it's OTC, with the prescription you won't pay tax. That can add up.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:35 PM
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My girlfriend and I both use a blood pressure med called "propanolol" for treating our uncontrollable performance anxiety. We have to go to the doctor EVERY time we need a perscription and explain what the symptoms are and what its used for. Even if its the same doctor... same stupid questions every time. Waste of time... for some stupid perscription we use every once in a while.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:37 PM
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There is too many pros and cons to this for me to make a statemant one way or the other. I will just have to wait and see what happens.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:38 PM
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It's about time.
This is a sensible move.
People who need blood pressure meds get high blood pressure just from having to take off work to go get the prescription, and pay the doctor his usual $100 +/_ for the office visit.
Definitely cheaper.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:46 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler

Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Oh this is wonderful. Obamacare at it's finest I guess. I can't afford the copays on my meds as it is, last thing I need it to pay for it completely out of pocket. This is one way to kill off people and keep the rest poorer.


Don't assume yet. I already pay less for generics than the co-pay. In other words, not having insurance is cheaper than having insurance. Generics for common stuff like blood pressure are very likely the targets here. Not having to go through a doctor will make these drugs vastly cheaper. Until you see statistics otherwise, don't jump to conclusions here.
edit on 4/30/2012 by schuyler because: (no reason given)


I have Medicaid and unless it's written specifically by the doctor, pharmacists are required to give you generics. My co-pay is $3 per med and $3 per doctor visit. Plus I have busted glasses because medicaid no longer pays for adult glasses. It'll cost about $200 to replace since my prescription is one month out of date.


Between bills, rent, gas, food, and last month taking my daughter to her father, I was in the hole. This month I have to get my car registered, redo my license, and have my car inspection (probably won't pass). I'll be lucky if I have something left.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:50 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
So we're mad when the government wants to meddle in our lives. And now we're mad when they take some of that meddling away.

Some people are never happy.



That's not it at all. Hypothetically this go through, you go to the pharmacy to take your "questionaire" to find out what your health problem is and have the pharmacist give you the medication for it, that you pay completely out of pocket (some can be downright expensive). How many more people are we going to see in the ER or dead because of a side effect that was triggered by genetics the pharmacist was unaware of? Don't get me wrong, I have nothing at all against pharmacists, it's just I can see this going badly. It does make you wonder why all of a sudden now, what repercussions this could have?



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:55 PM
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Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
So we're mad when the government wants to meddle in our lives. And now we're mad when they take some of that meddling away.

Some people are never happy.



That's not it at all. Hypothetically this go through, you go to the pharmacy to take your "questionaire" to find out what your health problem is and have the pharmacist give you the medication for it, that you pay completely out of pocket (some can be downright expensive). How many more people are we going to see in the ER or dead because of a side effect that was triggered by genetics the pharmacist was unaware of? Don't get me wrong, I have nothing at all against pharmacists, it's just I can see this going badly. It does make you wonder why all of a sudden now, what repercussions this could have?


How did you leap from bllod pressure and diabetes medications, as the article states, to all medication being readily available?

As long as there are limits on which medications will be available, which it sounds as though there will be, it is a good thing.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:58 PM
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Originally posted by Azjazzer8
My girlfriend and I both use a blood pressure med called "propanolol" for treating our uncontrollable performance anxiety. We have to go to the doctor EVERY time we need a perscription and explain what the symptoms are and what its used for. Even if its the same doctor... same stupid questions every time. Waste of time... for some stupid perscription we use every once in a while.



I have to take that twice a day, every day, along with Topamax for a cyst in my brain that causes migraines. The propranolol also works on my heart because I have an extra heartbeat. I also take lyrica and cymbalta for fibromyalgia and because I don't get level 4 REM sleep, I HAVE to take a sedative every night, or else I'm up for days on end to the point where I'm in zombie mode.

For people like me, who have multiple health issues, if your questionaire they're coming up with possibly says something and the pharmacist suggests a medication, you may have issues with that medication.

For example, my husband has protein C deficiency. Because it is a clotting disorder, my daughter will never be able to take any kind of birth control for the rest of her life. We were told this by an endocrinologist. Most birth controls can have a side effect of clotting. So if a pharmacist questionaire says she's to be put on birth control, it can run complications with her.

People like her, myself, and others like us is why I'm concerned. There are pros to this, in terms of being able to get certain medication that by all rights should be over the counter anyway, but there are also cons. The cons are what have me worried.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
So we're mad when the government wants to meddle in our lives. And now we're mad when they take some of that meddling away.

Some people are never happy.



That's not it at all. Hypothetically this go through, you go to the pharmacy to take your "questionaire" to find out what your health problem is and have the pharmacist give you the medication for it, that you pay completely out of pocket (some can be downright expensive). How many more people are we going to see in the ER or dead because of a side effect that was triggered by genetics the pharmacist was unaware of? Don't get me wrong, I have nothing at all against pharmacists, it's just I can see this going badly. It does make you wonder why all of a sudden now, what repercussions this could have?


How did you leap from bllod pressure and diabetes medications, as the article states, to all medication being readily available?

As long as there are limits on which medications will be available, which it sounds as though there will be, it is a good thing.




It's not that I leap. I try to look at things objectively. Say it's just blood pressure and diabetes, what is it in 3 years? 5? Where do we draw the line there, when we don't see doctors at all?



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:02 PM
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Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
So we're mad when the government wants to meddle in our lives. And now we're mad when they take some of that meddling away.

Some people are never happy.



That's not it at all. Hypothetically this go through, you go to the pharmacy to take your "questionaire" to find out what your health problem is and have the pharmacist give you the medication for it, that you pay completely out of pocket (some can be downright expensive). How many more people are we going to see in the ER or dead because of a side effect that was triggered by genetics the pharmacist was unaware of? Don't get me wrong, I have nothing at all against pharmacists, it's just I can see this going badly. It does make you wonder why all of a sudden now, what repercussions this could have?


How did you leap from bllod pressure and diabetes medications, as the article states, to all medication being readily available?

As long as there are limits on which medications will be available, which it sounds as though there will be, it is a good thing.




It's not that I leap. I try to look at things objectively. Say it's just blood pressure and diabetes, what is it in 3 years? 5? Where do we draw the line there, when we don't see doctors at all?


In my opinion, the less we are forced to go see the doctor, the better. An example:

I had hand surgery 2 years ago. I had to be referred from my GP, to a hand specialist. From the specialist, to a second specialist. From there, to the surgeon. Back to the specialist. ANd then back to my GP for pain meds.

Asinine.

No, people shouldnt be able to just buy these meds. But if you have a legit diagnosis, there is no reason to pay to go to the doctor every time you need it.
edit on 30-4-2012 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:08 PM
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It's very true that with people with complications and very complex issues just going to the pharamacist is probably not a good idea, but I don't think that is what is being advocated here. First, take your own self out of this and look at the general picture. Of all the millions of people taking drugs for chronic issues were relieved of going to a doctor every single time, wouldn't the entire healthy care system and the individuals be better off for it? I'm not saying it would for every single individual for every single issue.

But for common issues where you already know what is wrong and are under a doctor's care anyway, I was extremely surprised to discover my drugs were CHEAPER if I didn't use the copay! Now, they are not cheaper for the brand name stuff, of course, but basically I was cheating myself awhile there. Also, I want to put in a plug for pharmacists. I have treated glaucoma and one of my drugs, one of the "tan" series, Travatan, was $120 for a 1.5ml bottle that barely lasted me a month. (I'm not too good at hitting the eyeball, ya know?) I went to the pharmacist for a refill and she said, "Wait a sec! There's this generic tan that does the same thing for $8.00 a bottle." She called him up and he agreed. he didn't care what it cost; she did. Same affect.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 08:28 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots


It's not that I leap. I try to look at things objectively. Say it's just blood pressure and diabetes, what is it in 3 years? 5? Where do we draw the line there, when we don't see doctors at all?


In my opinion, the less we are forced to go see the doctor, the better. An example:

I had hand surgery 2 years ago. I had to be referred from my GP, to a hand specialist. From the specialist, to a second specialist. From there, to the surgeon. Back to the specialist. ANd then back to my GP for pain meds.

Asinine.

No, people shouldnt be able to just buy these meds. But if you have a legit diagnosis, there is no reason to pay to go to the doctor every time you need it.
edit on 30-4-2012 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)


I agree, we should have to go to the doctor for each and every little thing. My propranolol, topamax and a migraine med the doctor won't put refills on. In order to get refills, I have to see him. Ridiculous, yes. Completely so. But unfortunately there are some medications where the side effects are worse than the disease. I was on ambien for awhile for sleep about 2 years ago. Man, that stuff will mess you up! Forget '___', just take ambien. I hated it. I didn't sleep, I had hallucinations every night. I'd stand at the top of the stairs bobbing and weaving, having a conversation with whomever was awake. My husband was afraid I was going to fall down the stairs and kill myself accidentally. With ambien, you're awake, and you can see this stuff happening, but you can't stop it. How long before it, or Lunesta (ambien's cousin) are on the market as OTC by pharmacists? That would scare the pants off me.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 08:34 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler
It's very true that with people with complications and very complex issues just going to the pharamacist is probably not a good idea, but I don't think that is what is being advocated here. First, take your own self out of this and look at the general picture. Of all the millions of people taking drugs for chronic issues were relieved of going to a doctor every single time, wouldn't the entire healthy care system and the individuals be better off for it? I'm not saying it would for every single individual for every single issue.

But for common issues where you already know what is wrong and are under a doctor's care anyway, I was extremely surprised to discover my drugs were CHEAPER if I didn't use the copay! Now, they are not cheaper for the brand name stuff, of course, but basically I was cheating myself awhile there. Also, I want to put in a plug for pharmacists. I have treated glaucoma and one of my drugs, one of the "tan" series, Travatan, was $120 for a 1.5ml bottle that barely lasted me a month. (I'm not too good at hitting the eyeball, ya know?) I went to the pharmacist for a refill and she said, "Wait a sec! There's this generic tan that does the same thing for $8.00 a bottle." She called him up and he agreed. he didn't care what it cost; she did. Same affect.


I agree, that it can be cheaper sometimes. And taking myself out of the equation, you're still left with a great number of people who have chronic conditions like mine, also noted by a pharmacist in the article. It mentions in the article


“We think it’s a great development for everybody — for pharmacists, for patients and the whole health care system,” said Brian Gallagher, a lobbyist for the American Pharmacists Association. “The way we look at it is there are a lot of people out there with chronic conditions that are undertreated and this would enable the pharmacists to redirect these undertreated people back into the health care system.”

“The FDA has not offered any evidence establishing that it is safe, or patient outcomes are improved, when patients with hypertension, [high cholesterol], asthma or migraine headaches self-diagnose and manage these (or other) serious chronic medical conditions on their own,” she said.


If you go to some kiosk and answer questions to diagnose yourself for medication from the pharmacist, how is that different than going to WebMD, diagnosing yourself and saying to your doctor, "You should prescribe me such and such because this website said I have this."?



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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we survived for thousands of years without prescriptions, i'm sure we'll do fine without them.




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