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Twinkle No Twinkle No

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posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 08:09 PM
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Just went out for a smoke and noticed two stars in particular. When I hold my hand up, these two stars are just three fingers apart from each other. The one on the right is twinkling like there's no tomorrow. The other - nothing, not a twink.

If our atmosphere causes the twinkling of stars, why one star and not the other?




posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Idk if one was lower on the horizon or in fact a planet you might expect it to twinkle less than the other



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


i didnt think it was our atmosphere that caused the twinkling of stars...... but anything that might have passed in front of the light traveling from the distant star we see,



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by iforget
reply to post by jiggerj
 


Idk if one was lower on the horizon or in fact a planet you might expect it to twinkle less than the other


They were pretty even in the sky. I tried locating them on a star map. All I can say is they are to the left of the moon. WAY left. They might be part of the virgo constellation, but I could be WAY off.

Best I can do is: If you're in the northern hemisphere and directly facing the moon, these two stars would be at 7:00.
edit on 4/29/2012 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 08:34 PM
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Download Stellarium... you can pretty easily find what's in the sky any time of the year with it.

If it doesn't show up on there, then I'd start asking questions.

~Namaste



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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Stars twinkle but planets do not. If it's not twinkling chances are it's a planet. Stars are giving off light and energy in all kinds of forms, and lots of it. Our atmosphere causes the twinkling. Planets only reflect light from the sun, they do not produce their own. Hence they do not twinkle.



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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My guess is that your seeing Saturn and Spica which are in the Virgo constellation. Any star map or software should help you out. You can always go to the astronomy magazine website. They have an interactive starmap that would help and it's free, no downloading.

These two are making quite a pair. Almost like eyes peering down on us from above.



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 08:57 PM
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Originally posted by ZeroReady
Stars twinkle but planets do not. If it's not twinkling chances are it's a planet. Stars are giving off light and energy in all kinds of forms, and lots of it. Our atmosphere causes the twinkling. Planets only reflect light from the sun, they do not produce their own. Hence they do not twinkle.


Venus twinkles like there's no tomorrow!

I don't about Saturn and the others though.



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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It depends on how hot and far away the star is and how much light is hitting it. Others stars that don't twinkle are planets. THey have a certain number of photons hitting bouncing of the surface toward you. Other bright stars are galaxies with trillions of different light rays bouncing all over the place that gives the twinkle. The sun would twinkle when viewed from another galaxy, yet our planet would not.



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 

my friend and i noticed about 11 stars twinkling like we've never seen before. at first, we thought they were some form of helicopter, but they never moved, and the light coming from them was white, green, blue, purple, and red. i have never seen stars do that before. that was two days ago. last night we were going to check again, but it was too cloudy to see any stars.



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Venus is suppose to be very visible right now.
Too many clouds for me too see anything here


Venus



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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Originally posted by ZeroReady
Stars twinkle but planets do not. If it's not twinkling chances are it's a planet. Stars are giving off light and energy in all kinds of forms, and lots of it. Our atmosphere causes the twinkling. Planets only reflect light from the sun, they do not produce their own. Hence they do not twinkle.


No kidding! I never knew that. Thank you so much!



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by windword

Originally posted by ZeroReady
Stars twinkle but planets do not. If it's not twinkling chances are it's a planet. Stars are giving off light and energy in all kinds of forms, and lots of it. Our atmosphere causes the twinkling. Planets only reflect light from the sun, they do not produce their own. Hence they do not twinkle.


Venus twinkles like there's no tomorrow!

I don't about Saturn and the others though.


I didn't see venus twinkle, but it was HUGE tonight. One website claimed that many people believe it to be a UFO. lol


jra

posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 09:57 PM
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I'd have to echo the Saturn and Spica as well. But it's hard to know for sure without adequate location information. And planets generally don't twinkle or not as much as stars do anyway. Mars should also be visible, just left of the Moon (9 O'clock). If you can see it, is it twinkling at all?



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Stars twinkle due to brightness and the atmosphere. The brighter the object in the sky, the more twinkle you will see. Sirius is the "Twinkle" champion and its about 8 light years from earth. You will see all kinds of colors due impart to Sirius B rotating around it. On any given clear night it will look like a strobe.

Venus is very bright in the western sky and will appear long before dusk.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 05:06 AM
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Originally posted by samlf3rd
It depends on how hot and far away the star is and how much light is hitting it. Others stars that don't twinkle are planets. THey have a certain number of photons hitting bouncing of the surface toward you. Other bright stars are galaxies with trillions of different light rays bouncing all over the place that gives the twinkle. The sun would twinkle when viewed from another galaxy, yet our planet would not.


Stars twinkle because they are a point source of light, planets are close enough to look like a disc that's why they are not effected by the turbulence in the atmosphere.

If you saw the earth from a great enough distance that it was a point source of light and your location had a similar atmosphere to earth then the earth would appear to twinkle!



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 05:59 AM
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Yeah! I noticed them the other night! Then they were right beside each other.
Here is a screenshot of my stellarium about 10 minutes ago at 3:46 a.m. Berkeley CA




posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:26 AM
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reply to post by windword
 


Venus doesn't twinkle.

OP, it was probably Mars or Saturn. Planets don't twinkle.




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