It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

I'm a 54 year old woman, and I was told to remove my hood before I could enter a shop lol

page: 6
16
<< 3  4  5    7  8 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:17 AM
link   
My only local store is a Sainsburys and unfortunatly my work commitments mean that my big shop of the week coincides with the schools kicking out. The security guards follow regular customers about so that they don't have to confront the hundreds of kids who are filling bags from the cake counter and eating them in store, before leaving without paying, they turn a blind eye to the bags of food ordered at the hot food counter, then slipped into their rucksacks at the back of the store, the piles of sweets and bottles of pop which vanish at the same time. They don't even check out why under 16s are crowded around the spirit counters, if regular customers can see it happening in plain sight, why can't the security guards, aided by the CCTV cameras. They also never challenge the fact that they either have no shopping basket, or half a dozen of them in a group, have only one basket, and only one or two little items in it. If you can find a guard who isn't following an old person and tell them what is happening, they say that they are aware of it and watching them, but I have never seen any of them followed or aprehended. To make it worse, they take the food outside and eat it on the benches, thanks Sainsburys for charging me the extra on my shopping, just to feed these starving and thirsty kids, although you could spend some of the extra money on security staff and training for them.

Incidently I have only once been asked in there to remove my hat whilst shopping, which was embarrassing because I was only wearing it because I had no time to wash my hair and it was a mess. As far as I know they have never asked " a local celebrity " to remove her usual disguise of hat and big scarf ( so that no-one recognises her, but it is not a very good disguise ).
edit on 30-4-2012 by Qwenn because: spelling




posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:22 AM
link   
reply to post by doobydoll
 


Good.

If the store has a 'no hoods' policy then they have enforced it, so they've done nothing wrong. Unless you think that middle-aged people should be exempt and their policy should only target a specific demographic (e.g. youths - which of course you may or may not have been to them, given that they might not have been able to tell with your hood up).

Don't blame the supermarket, blame the feckless individuals in society who make 'no hood' policies inevitable.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:36 AM
link   
Not sure why this upsets people...

In America when you enter banks and stores it's common courtesy to remove your hood because the workers in those places are trained to eye suspicious activity, so if you want to be followed inside a grocery store, just keep your hood on.

in short, don't be dumb, and remove it when entering a business.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:38 AM
link   
So, according to some here, a policy of 'no hoods' inside stores now extends to a ban outside stores?



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:41 AM
link   
Reply to post by doobydoll
 


She was about to enter the store.....therefore her hood had to be taken off. Its not that hard to understand. I find this interesting though because of the whole hoodie issue that arose with the Trayvon Martin case here in the US....I had no clue it was a UK thing too.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:44 AM
link   
reply to post by doobydoll
 


Are you referring to the fact that you were stopped as you walked into the store?

If so, then you could just as easily word this as a ban on hoods 'when entering' the store, which again would be acceptable. If you were clearly entering the store then I dont think its unreasonable to point this out - one might just as well argue that had the guard let you enter with your hood up then he could have immediately thrown you out, causing a much bigger scene!



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 06:47 AM
link   
It also amuses me that the staff will have their faces painted and wear costumes on various occasions throughout the year, I wonder how a customer doing the same would be treated, I have just the curiosity to try it out next halloween, but I would probably end up locked-up for acting suspiciously. Although I might just go dressed as a giant Tomato on Tomato-mass-day ( next Tuesday ) after all, it is compulsory dress for all of us followers ( well there is only me so far, but I am always recruiting ) and we still have to eat.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:00 AM
link   
If you ban hoods, you ban anything covering your face, religious or not. Bam.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:11 AM
link   

Originally posted by doobydoll
So, according to some here, a policy of 'no hoods' inside stores now extends to a ban outside stores?


Dooby, dear.. face it.. youre fooling no one. Youre a raincoat and hood wearing thug that went in to rob that store with your dog standing as look out.


If ya ban hoods, ya ban muslim head gear and pirates eye patches along with halloween masks ( which has alread been done.. on halloween). I think we all have went a little mad sometimes. I went to the art museum and was carrying a large Coach hobo purse ( which I had just received as a gift and was pretty happy about carrying) and had the strap over my shoulder. The bag was pushed a little to my side middle of my back because I was herding kids in. The guard stopped me and said " no backpacks allowed in the museum". I said it was a purse and I was carrying my purse in. There were a few words and another guard came over... this one a female. She said it was my purse and allowed me in. Maybe if we are going to profile.. we probably should figure out exactly what the banned things are and how to identify them before we go banning people. Identifying a threat is not a bad thing.. but for Gods sake.. someone train these dopes.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:11 AM
link   
Can anyone else see that we are treated as all guilty of pre-crime?

But to get us to accept it we're told it's all about our safety and security.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:17 AM
link   
Next time go in dressed as a benedictine nun, see if they ask you to remove your coif and veil.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by doobydoll
Can anyone else see that we are treated as all guilty of pre-crime?

But to get us to accept it we're told it's all about our safety and security.


It's not about your safety, it's so they've got a record of you entering the store should they need to use it later if there was a need to in court. Having said that, I'm wrong, it is also about your safety in a sense. In recent cases of missing/murdered people, footage has been shown on local and national news of people entering a store as it gave a time snap of (sadly) when and where they were last known to be seen. Not sure why that is an issue?



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:33 AM
link   
reply to post by something wicked
 





I said it was a bit crap of you to tie your dog outside in the rain, I did not call you a crappy owner - the two are not the same.

Yes they are.

Crappy owners do crappy things.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:34 AM
link   
The argument put forward by some that a Muslim women or nun would get away with it is moot. The law prohibits discrimination based upon grounds of sex, age or religion.

Denying someone access to a store because they had a Burkha on could be seen as discriminatory and they would run the risk of being sued. Asking someone to lower their hood is obviously not based upon discrimination as it is a generic, not religious, item of clothing.

Also, they didn't have to let you in at all. As a private premises, they can refuse access to anyone without reason. However, if they give a reason, it cannot be based upon age, sex or religion..

Confusing? You bet!

Now, what we have is far less "Orwellian" that they have in the US or Europe, where it is Law to remove face coverings in Public. At least here you have a choice, for now anyway....



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 07:37 AM
link   
Doobydoll I have to ask, as you brought your age bracket into the debate in your OP, why do you think your age should have any bearing on the guard's actions?



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 08:43 AM
link   

Originally posted by ComeFindMe
Doobydoll I have to ask, as you brought your age bracket into the debate in your OP, why do you think your age should have any bearing on the guard's actions?


It's a typical middle England thing. Quite happy to insist on everyone else getting treated this way, or being discriminated upon because of their age, race or what their wearing etc, but god forbid it happen to them...



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 08:46 AM
link   
The whole 'hoody' ban started because of some young miscreants who wear 'hoody' jumpers run about the streets and malls stealing and mugging, with their hoods purposely pulled right over their faces to avoid identification before they sprint off. But now it has gone from that to a ban on everyone's headwear in malls, not just hoodies, even elderly people in wheelchairs have to remove their hats. My hood wasn't covering my face, just my hair. And it isn't a hoody, it's a raincoat with a hood, a once-normal outerwear made specifically for rainy weather.

And I resent being treated as if I MIGHT do something wrong.

Now, if my hood was pulled up and over my face on approaching the store and it wasn't raining, that would be suspicious.

edit on 30-4-2012 by doobydoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 08:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by doobydoll
The whole 'hoody' ban started because of some young miscreants who wear 'hoody' jumpers run about the streets and malls stealing and mugging, with their hoods purposely pulled right over their faces to avoid identification before they sprint off. But now it has gone from that to a ban on everyone's headwear in malls, not just hoodies, even elderly people in wheelchairs have to remove their hats. My hood wasn't covering my face, just my hair. And it isn't a hoody, it's a raincoat with a hood, a once-normal outerwear made specifically for rainy weather.

And I resent being treated as if I MIGHT do something wrong.


It's about being able to identify people. If you have your hood up, you cannot be identified. How old you are, what your age is etc is irrelevant. Remember those two 50+ year old women who robbed ASDA of hundreds of pounds worth of booze around Christmas time?

Also, it is their property so they can treat you pretty much how they like.

Don't like it? Shop somewhere else. It's the only thing they will take notice of anyway.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 08:53 AM
link   
reply to post by stumason
 


I guess the argument they are trying to put forward is that if your "face" is covered you pose a threat to security of the store. Now if we apply that same threat of security to anybody covering their face it would also apply to religious covering, road safety protective gear such as helmets and so forth.

I think its discriminatory for a person backed by religion to get a free pass, but someone outside their religion wouldn't.

Discrimination goes both ways.

Even though its part of the law, the law seems 'moot', seeing as its unfair and all.

This being said things can still get a bit absurd, like asking someone who has an injury to the head like facial burns for instance, to remove all bandages covering the face.

Religion needs to stop being an excuse to be excluded from set law or rules.

Why religion shouldn't be an excuse:

#1 One notable occasion occurred in London when an Islamic terrorist wore his sister's burqa and took her identity card so he could pass through Heathrow Airport security and flee the UK.

#2 In Moscow, a number of female Islamic terrorists wearing the burqa entered a crowded theatre filled with families and children. Under the burqas they concealed rifles and explosive belts.

(pulled from) Article - SMH

My stance is equality. So if I walk into a store at the same time as a Muslim lady, a Christian nun and I have a hoody and am told to remove the covering, I expect equal rights. Otherwise your discriminating and segregating me from the other two people.



posted on Apr, 30 2012 @ 09:03 AM
link   
reply to post by Strainz
 


Totally agree with you mate....

My post was just pointing out the law as it stands, but not actually indicative of my personal feelings..

Perhaps I should put a disclaimer in my sig....



new topics

top topics



 
16
<< 3  4  5    7  8 >>

log in

join