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U.S. Decieved Into Believing There is Such A Thing as Fair Taxation

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posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:08 PM
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Note, after (a) through (e) it clearly says

"There is hereby imposed on the taxable income of— "




posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by thegagefather
 





Who?


No, not who:


There is hereby imposed on the taxable income of—


Taxable income is not a who, but rather a what.

What is "taxable income"?

Edit to Add: Good for you! I gave you a star for that. Now, what is "taxable income"?


edit on 26-4-2012 by Jean Paul Zodeaux because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:11 PM
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Apparently some people think that it is "manfest destiny" to tax people in here.

Dunno what that has to do with taxes but how about some separation of church and state?



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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Tax that comes directly from your income.

i.e. - The money you earn that isn't tips or similar gratuity. Because tips aren't technically "taxable" but are still defined as "income."
edit on 26-4-2012 by thegagefather because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:14 PM
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Neo,

I actually never said that.

Ever.

In fact, I never even said anything similar to that.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 


Yes, Economic inequality for Americans blatently at its best.
These type of facts certainly test my patriotism, and tolerance.

S&F



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
Apparently some people think that it is "manfest destiny" to tax people in here.

Dunno what that has to do with taxes but how about some separation of church and state?



(Randomly, my quote button decided to work)

Furthermore,

Seperation of Church and state is an illusion.

Who gets the president elected? Almost assuredly Evangelical Christians.

Any who lobbies to Evangelical Christians? Politicians.
edit on 26-4-2012 by thegagefather because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-4-2012 by thegagefather because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:17 PM
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Originally posted by thegagefather
Tax that comes directly from your income.

i.e. - The money you earn that isn't tips or similar gratuity. Because tips aren't technically "taxable" but are still defined as "income."
edit on 26-4-2012 by thegagefather because: (no reason given)


Try sticking with the legal definition, brother.

Taxable Income Defined

In the strictest sense of the law, what is "taxable income"?



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:18 PM
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Definition of 'Taxable Income'
The amount of income that is used to calculate an individual’s or a company’s income tax due. Taxable income is generally described as gross income or adjusted gross income minus any deductions, exemptions or other adjustments that are allowable in that tax year.

Taxable income is also generated from appreciated assets that have been sold or capitalized during the year and from dividends and interest income. Income from these sources is generally taxed at a different rate and calculated separately by the tax entity.


Investopedia explains 'Taxable Income'
Individuals may choose to use a standard deduction amount for a given tax year. This amount is subtracted from gross income to arrive at the final taxable income figure. If individual deductions are claimed, the person or company will hope to have a total amount deducted from gross income lower than what would be achieved using the standard deduction. Some typical deductions that lower many tax bills include IRA contributions and certain business expenses.

There's one textbook definition, and one definition according to investors.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by thegagefather
 


Religion has nothing to do with the topic being discussed

the introduction of it by who was it?

Is nothing more than deflection.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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It was actually introduced by the OP after I talked about Kings.

Could read the posts and figure that out, there's only a few pages.




posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:22 PM
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I did, however, talk about philosophy.

And that's because I thought the questions at hand were closely related to philosophy.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by thegagefather
 


Another star for you, brother, but let's not concern ourselves with what others say about these definitions. If the statutes are clear and easy for any person of average intelligence or better to understand, then we should be able to make our own determinations ourselves.

So, what then is Gross Income and Adjusted Gross Income?



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:28 PM
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Jean, I understand your passion in regards to taxes, and written law.

By why does it matter what the definition is?

Perhaps a metaphor of my own will shine some light into my meaning.
it's a crude metaphor.

We are inmates in a maximum security prison. The government is our jailor. Our money is the prison art that he he sees us making while doing his rounds. Every other Thursday, he takes us out of the room (so we don't know his methods) as he searches for contraband, which he doesn't even define. What he finds and wants, he takes, and it doesn't matter if the warden knows, because the warden isn't on the inmate's side. Our "gross income" is what we make, our "adjusted gross income" is what we make that the jailor wants, because he knows if he takes all of it, we won't make more - and he just so happens to LOOOOOVE prison art.
edit on 26-4-2012 by thegagefather because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:31 PM
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reply to post by thegagefather
 





By why does it matter what the definition is?


It is how we determine whether we are actually liable or not, actually subject to the applicable revenue law or not.

Try this metaphor:

If your landlord came to you in February and told you that you still owed a months rent from the previous year, but you pulled out 12 receipts showing you paid for each month of that year, and yet your landlord responds by saying; "Oh, I know. I'm not talking about those twelve months, I'm talking about the thirteenth month", would you just fork that rent over?



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:33 PM
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If my landlord had told me in advance, "despite paying me monthly rent, I'm going to also charge you a yearly bill for an amount based upon other factors" I would, since I'd already agreed to do so.

And if it wasn't in her contract, I'd fight it!

But if the judge was on her side, because he knew she already told me this verbally, and/or he was a close personal friend, I'd be S.O.L.

And tax-evasion is not trial-by-peer.
edit on 26-4-2012 by thegagefather because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by thegagefather
 


I didn't ask you to qualify my metaphor, I asked you if you would fork over money for the "thirteenth month"? Your following sentence, however, is a direct answer to my direct question. Of course, if it wasn't in the contract, you would fight it. Who wouldn't? You would not have philosophical debates about how wrong charging a thirteenth month is, you would instead demand that landlord prove there is actually 13 months in a year, wouldn't you?

People are not tried for "tax evasion", and are generally charged with "failure to file" or "conspiracy to commit fraud", and you are mistaken, if you were charged with this you are most assuredly entitled to a jury of your peers.

If you enter a "tax court" you will not be afforded this, but if you've entered a "tax court" you have not been charged with any crime and that "court" is inviting you to dispute the amount owed.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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Originally posted by thegagefather

i.e. - The money you earn that isn't tips or similar gratuity. Because tips aren't technically "taxable" but are still defined as "income


In the 70's while young and a taxi driver in Las Vegas I was called in for an audit by the IRS. I was penalized for not paying taxes on the tips I received.

Is that a more recent ruling or are taxes not uniform throughout the US? This agent did not apparently know tips are not taxable. More to the point, I did not know they were not taxable income - if what you say is correct.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:02 PM
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double post




edit on 26-4-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Once you're contractually bound as a taxpayer then the IRS will tax you on "income, from whatever source derived".




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