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Any Husky dog keepers on ats?

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posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:13 PM
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A friend of mine has been left with a Sibirian Husky that belonged to her x partner. She's trying her best to give the dog a good home but is having problems with food. Whatever she feeds it comes out the other end as liquid.

Food from the stores is the worst, he doesnt even want to eat it so she's now buying various meats and veg and cooking meals for him. He realy enjoys his meals now but he's still squirting quite a lot but nowhere near as bad as with the store food. She bumped into a chap in the local park who was walking three Huskys and she asked hm what he feeds them, he laughed and asked her if the dog was squirting. She told him what she was doing and his advice was to just keep trying different foods untill she finds the right one.

Any Husky owners on ats? if so advice would be very much appreciated.




posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


You need to feed the dog a bland diet for a few weeks.
plain cooked rice and chicken. No salt or seasonings.
More than likely ate something that upset it's stomach and regular dog food just keeps it irritated.
ALSO, don't let the dog over-eat. Start off with small amounts and then slowly increase to normal portions.

I'm speaking from personal experience, I'm not a vet.
However, I did get the advice from a vet.

edit on 26-4-2012 by GmoS719 because: (no reason given)


PS. Boil the chicken and rice.
edit on 26-4-2012 by GmoS719 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Do you know if the dog has been checked for parasites?
Worms can cause diarrhea.
The evidence would be in the stool. Might be a good idea to take the dog in for a check up.
Hope it works out for them

I have a husky and she has been a great friend for 12 years.
Best of luck



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:30 PM
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I give mine Iams but you have to tapper the change over 3-5 days. To prevent drastic system shock you can add a few spoons of natural yogurt that has probiotics in it. If you want to give treats you can cover the dog food bites in the same yogurt and freeze them as snacks. This is information I got from a local breeder we just adopted a new puppy(great dane) and she says this works with most dogs. My dane eats eagle pack and my husky eats iams.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by Neysa
 


He's been checked for worms and given pills just incase but still the same. The advice from the vet was to use his very expensive food but the result was just the same.

Like yours he's a fantastic dog, very protective of her young boy too.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:38 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Glad to hear the dog is healthy.

Wish I had some useful info regarding his diet, but my dogs will eat anything and love it. Lol



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:45 PM
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Give him some plain canned (or fresh) pumpkin. It's supposed to help with such issues, and I gave some to my lab puppy when he got diarrhea - he was too young for his vaccines when I got him at 5 weeks old.
It worked. Along with a little tiny bit of Pedialite (baby section of drugstore). Once the diarrhea has settled, get some good organic kibble.

I've heard that small portions of Greek yoghurt helps too, but I've never tried it. Plain pumpkin - good stuff.

I had an old Siberian Husky once as a rescue, and he didn't have any such issues. I don't feed canned food, ever. It gives large dogs the runs. I use organic kibble, and carrots and sweet potatoes for snacks.

I have a Shepherd Husky Coyote cross, and her system is so efficient, that she poops the same size as my Shihtzu.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by Neysa
 


I had a Border Collie for 17 years and he'd eat anything too, even the stuff their not supposed to eat like chocolate!!
It seems this is a known problem with Huskys, maybe we shouldn't keep them as pets, probably better to be left in the wild where they belong.

Thanks to ALL for the replies.
Any suggestions welcome.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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My dog did the same exact thing a couple of months ago....(Great Pyrenees) and did the whole vet check up. I was advised to feed the dog cottage cheese. Start in small amounts, and gradually increase. After a few days, you can introduce what the poster above said; plain yogurt even if they lick it off the spoon. After a few days, start mixing in a Tablespoon of good quality dog food (either canned or dry). Gradually increase the amount of dog food (do not change diets abruptly) and give less of the cottage cheese, until the dog is eating the dry food alone. It worked for my dog very well.

Even if the diarrhea stops, keep up with the cottage cheese for a few days. And I agree with the above poster...large dogs shouldn't eat canned food. It's also horrible for their teeth. It encourages and causes tarter. The canned pumpkin is also an excellent idea that was suggested to me, but my dog just turned up his nose!


edit on 26-4-2012 by jdb51 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:53 PM
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It may be due to stress also. If the poor thing is in a totally new environment, new master...it takes time to feel secure in big changes. Everyone else is giving good advice on food...I say make sure he gets a lot of love and reassurance.

Des



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


Hi. Thanks for the advice, Your the second person to mention yoghurt, I'll pass the info on to her.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


I too had a pedigree Siberian Husky a few years ago and his stomach was very sensitive. We only fed him organic food. You should take him to the vet to check for any bugs/worms in his stomach.

and yes, I truly believe that unless you have a very very large backyard, a Siberian Husky probably isnt for you. My dog had so much energy and I felt so bad because I didnt have a big backyard and it was always sunny weather here in So. CA.


He was probably better off in a cooler climate.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Also mention the canned pumpkin, make sure she double checks that there's no spices in it. Just a small can, in case the dog doesn't like it.

All of mine love the stuff.

It's also worth it to pay extra for high end food. Not the stuff from the vet's unless she checks the ingredients. Much of the stuff at vet's offices is full of chemicals.
Avoid corn based foods, it's just a filler. Make sure there's real meat, and lots of different types of vegies.
They're usually higher in calories, so you feed less, and the yard has much smaller poops to pick up.
The extra cost balances out by being able to feed smaller portions.
edit on 26-4-2012 by snowspirit because: added



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


Thanks, thats often missed by people
He's been with her for about a year so he should be adjusted by now.

My brother had a border collie and he had to work away for six months, while he was gone his dog became quite ill, even vomiting blood. He had a good vet who said the dog was pining for his master. My brother rushed back home and the dog emidiately recovered. They realy are mans best friend



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


I'll mention the pumpkin. Seems an odd food for what is almost a wolf
One of his favourits is to steal a potatoe from the box, maybe he's been trying to tell her he wants veggie


She's toaly organic so the dog is too.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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My Bear Boy is a 10 month old Great Pyrenees/110 lbs. He's on Lamb,rice and veggie mix. Pretzel nuggets dipped in peanut butter and frozen for training treats. He also helps himself to pelleted goat feed when he can snag a mouthful...

He also gets whole carrots to chew on....



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 07:53 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone
My Bear Boy is a 10 month old Great Pyrenees/110 lbs. He's on Lamb,rice and veggie mix. Pretzel nuggets dipped in peanut butter and frozen for training treats. He also helps himself to pelleted goat feed when he can snag a mouthful...

He also gets whole carrots to chew on....


I love those dogs!!! They're sooo gorgeous! And sooo cuddly!

Lots of work with their fur I would imagine. My Shihtzu is the only one of my three that I have to groom, and a Pyrenees is about 20 times his size
And White!

I had a Collie cross years ago, that I used to bath with a whole bottle of Johnson's baby shampoo for each bath.

My larger 2, Lab and the Shepherd cross also love peanut butter on whole grain toast.
Actually, they love almost anything, but the peanut butter is special.

**my little Shihtzu's name is Ned, so I call him my Neddy Bear



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


Neddy Bear...how adorable! Yep, Bear requires about 30 mins grooming every night. He's out with the goats during the day...he's the flock guard. At night after goats are in their barn, Bear comes in for din din and grooming. I started the daily grooming when he was 8 weeks old, so he loves it. Even flips over for me to do the other side on command. If he could purrrrr...I'm sure he would...


I'll take a current photo tomorrow and post it..

Des


edit on 26-4-2012 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 09:14 PM
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I've never owned a Husky per se but have tiny Spitz- Pomeranian, and a very high energy Border Collie, but also have Veterinary experience as well as had a roommate with a part Husky for a while. They are very sensitive and especially sensitive as all dogs are when receiving a new home. They can all suffer from separation anxiety. Seems that this is the case here. Important note is comfort to help. Takes steps at a time for example introducing the dog to different sectors of her life. Time varies from canine to canine.

As well as food. Doesn't look like the dog is used to the diet she is providing. May want to look into kibbles instead while either slowly introducing the other food. High energy breeds need certain foods. I suggest pet stores for seeking those foods over grocery/dept stores for good reason such as better quality, more variety and prescription dietary foods. Keep in mind it takes time for new foods introduced for the body to get used to them. At first they may have stomach discomfort and irregular bowl movements.

Lastly, a Vet checkup, if she/he has not had one as of late. Good preventative measures as... Sadly I've dealt with cases where the immune system of the animal is weakened which sparked organisms in the new environment to cause the animal to be very sick.
edit on 26-4-2012 by dreamingawake because: more



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:05 PM
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Yep, did the former master have these problems?does he/she visit?ever?
Maybe try that and see if anything changes if all else fails....
Huskys get a lot of fish up north where they are fed raw frozen ones ....among other things like cariboo, etc...
Not much corn in the Northwest Territories.....only what you can pack in.......
I agree to the bland diet....rice and chicken...veges.....It cured my ulcers.....so....
Once hes pooing more solid...then work him slowly onto a good protien food....
If you wish to feed canned dog food then mix it with dry food for a big high energy dog it wouldnt be amiss to get a half a can a day.....with dry food...

Has she ever tried Immodium ?
Just asking.....



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