"The Secret Meeting that Changed Hip-hop and Destroyed a Generation"

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posted on May, 1 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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Let me get this straight. Every artist signed is told what to put in their lyrics and nobody speaks out against it? The entire main stream hip hop community is told what to do at all times? It couldn't possibly be that when young men get money their default activities involve drugs, women, expensive cars and night clubs? Is 50 cent supposed to be at the Library when not writing music?

One thing the Government does not like is competition. Why then would these rappers that are so under control be talking about selling drugs? You know what sparked the change? 2pac sticking 2 fingers out the window screaming **** YOU! But you know what the man still talked about problems and how the world would be different if we focused on what was real. Hip hop went down when morons were given a voice. Pure and simple.




posted on May, 1 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by awakwforthe1sttime
 


Rap music is more accepted in the mainstream today than it was in the 80's and 90's. Like I said in a previous post, rappers like Jay-Z are right up there in popularity with huge pop acts like Taylor Swift and Maroon 5. Why? Content. In the 80's and 90's rappers brought attention to the reality of the streets, poverty, crime, violence, gangs, drugs, etc. and also afro-consciousness, racism, inequality, government and police corruption. The music was radical, taking influence from funk and avant-garde movements. There was a message. There was a DJ cutting records and an MC or crew, clever at rhyming. Today, the DJ has mostly been replaced by keyboards and sampling and rappers have been reduced to braggarts, who worship themselves and material possessions.

The "positive" rappers are the ones who rap about clubbing, getting money and being famous. The "negative" rappers glorify smoking weed, getting drunk, illicit sex, violence, etc. That's when the lyrics are even comprehensible and not gibberish. There is no message anymore. If anything, youths are left with this choice:

1) Conform to the ideas of American consumerism and greed. Money = Power = Happiness
2) Drop out of school and wind up dead or in jail.

The irony here is that those who've always been critical of black people say things like they wish they'd stop killing themselves, stop being victims, stop complaining, etc. But when black people had a real, creative, progressive voice with hip-hop music, it wasn't as successful. Should we be surprised that rappers today mostly blabber nonsense or rap about getting rich? Well, they've fallen right in line with Wall Street. The establishment should jump for joy because black folks stopped talking about scary things like Allah, killing cops and overthrowing the government.

the Black Eyed Peas started out resembling a hip-hop act, but stagnated and had to redefine themselves as a pop act. They hired Fergie, created flashy costumes, a ridiculous stage show and started doing commercials for Target and DirecTV. They're rewarded with Grammy nominations and a performance at the Super Bowl.

It's a shame what hip-hop (in the public eye) has been reduced to. But likewise, look what's historically happened elsewhere in music: Little Richard was replaced with the Everly Brothers, The Ramones were replaced with The Pretenders. Alice in Chains was replaced with Nickleback. I don't blame a secret conspiracy, just American society.
edit on 5/1/2012 by NaKeDuSk because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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The article would have you believe that these music and prison officials were also inserting some sort of mind control into these "new" rap songs. Lest we forget that probably 65% of gangster rap sales and fans are white suburban kids. And last time I checked this music hadn't cause much decay around my neighborhood. I get it, bad influences obviously won't help the situation if your poor. But I don't think anybody said that Frank Sinatra caused poor Italian immigrants to go join the mafia in their era....



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by Jagermeister
Let me get this straight. Every artist signed is told what to put in their lyrics and nobody speaks out against it?...

...Hip hop went down when morons were given a voice. Pure and simple.



I don't see why the rappers would have to be in on it. They probably are just encouraged by the labels to make a certain sound that sells and they roll with it. The problem isn't the morons, it's the people giving only them the megaphone.



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by MikeNice81
 


I don't think you have a clue what the 5% nation really is.

They are mostly muslim, so it is from and muslim point of view, not judeo-christian.

Ever read about the Dajjal?

Hi Tek


Career
1996-2000

Hi-Tek started his rap career with hip hop group Mood and had a regional hit with "Hustle on the Side". That song was made for Mood's album Doom, which featured amongst others Brooklyn MC Talib Kweli. Talib and Hi-Tek clicked immediately, and Hi-Tek went on to produce most of Talib Kweli and Mos Def's Black Star (1998). In 2000, Tek and Kweli (under the name Reflection Eternal) released Train of Thought (2000) on Rawkus Records, with raps by Talib Kweli and beats by Hi-Tek. It enjoyed moderate crossover radio success with the singles "The Blast" and "Move Somethin'". Reflection Eternal released a follow-up album titled Revolutions Per Minute on May 18, 2010.


Notice he made a record named DOOM, then went on to work with Mos Def's BS

Track List
2 "Astronomy (8th Light)" Da Beatminerz Talib Kweli, Mos Def, Weldon Irvine 3:23

Mos Def
True Magic
The Ecstatic
track 1 ---> Supermagic


Do you notice the common theme here that I am trying to point out. Whatever you think about magic and religion does not matter, I am simply pointing out that it IS important to the people who produce and perform the music.

I don't give a flying F about the NY HipPop wrapper scene. I am pointing out what they actually say and do. You know, actions speak louder than words.
edit on 2-5-2012 by MasterGemini because: woops



posted on May, 3 2012 @ 03:47 AM
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reply to post by RandomEsotericScreenname
 


cool story bro



posted on May, 3 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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BDP's "Criminal Minded" was released in ...1986. So much for the "meeting that changed hip hop"...



posted on May, 3 2012 @ 09:30 AM
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Who knows if this meeting actually happened(although I find it plausible), but, if you're a rapper, it's pretty easy to see the writing on the wall from the people who run the record industry. positive rap won't get airplay, gangsta rap and consumerism rap(Diddy, basically), will get you the $$. No meeting necessary. Rappers will self-conform to what's required, or they stay a "struggle" rapper(the kind that says "I'm a rapper" while reading you that nights specials)



posted on May, 3 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by michaelbrux
the fact is...Rap is older than the specific sub-genre that many racists condemn and if it has produced some of the most incredible artistic personalities any generation will ever see.

the following 'rap' is from the 1960s and the voice of the lead vocal is nothing less than legendary...it would be a shame if we lost it when the fascists destroy all of our arts.


Singing isn't rap dude.
They are two different spheres, similar meanings and messages sometimes but don't try and mix them, it just can't be so.



posted on May, 3 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by LightsideAssassin
Who knows if this meeting actually happened(although I find it plausible), but, if you're a rapper, it's pretty easy to see the writing on the wall from the people who run the record industry. positive rap won't get airplay, gangsta rap and consumerism rap(Diddy, basically), will get you the $$. No meeting necessary. Rappers will self-conform to what's required, or they stay a "struggle" rapper(the kind that says "I'm a rapper" while reading you that nights specials)


Youtube and other media outlets are slowly making the music industry obsolete. This moment if you want to make music the only thing you need is a $10 mic and a video camera. As technology continues to evolve, control over who gets on the radio will be given back to the people based on preference and not this fake industry that decides what you listen to based on whatever political crap they want to push on artists.



posted on May, 3 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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I think this is absolutely true! I've read a similar story a couple of years ago, can't remember where right now, the chemtrails fog my memory these days! But i don't just think that the supposed meeting with the music execs was the only one of it's kind, i think that the movie and television execs were given an equal agenda! Just look at the direction all media entertainment has gone in the last couple of decades and to me it's obvious!

They want to make us dumber, sicker, and sterile all the while poisoning the minds of our youth and unsuspecting public in general with the mass media "SUPER WEAPON"

"IT'S TIME TO REVOLT FOLKS" We have been getting played for far too long!



posted on May, 4 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by Jagermeister
Let me get this straight. Every artist signed is told what to put in their lyrics and nobody speaks out against it? The entire main stream hip hop community is told what to do at all times? It couldn't possibly be that when young men get money their default activities involve drugs, women, expensive cars and night clubs? Is 50 cent supposed to be at the Library when not writing music?

One thing the Government does not like is competition. Why then would these rappers that are so under control be talking about selling drugs? You know what sparked the change? 2pac sticking 2 fingers out the window screaming **** YOU! But you know what the man still talked about problems and how the world would be different if we focused on what was real. Hip hop went down when morons were given a voice. Pure and simple.


Thats what happens when you sell your soul. You become a puppet. Listen to lyrics closely.....



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 12:45 AM
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Originally posted by NaKeDuSk
reply to post by awakwforthe1sttime
 


Rap music is more accepted in the mainstream today than it was in the 80's and 90's. Like I said in a previous post, rappers like Jay-Z are right up there in popularity with huge pop acts like Taylor Swift and Maroon 5. ......



Jay-Z is a late 80's 90's rapper.

Hes been in the game a long time.



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 06:53 AM
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Dont believe a word for it. The "fledging" entertainment industry of the 90s turning to private prisons for a buck?

Gangsta rap was just taking themes from country music (The lawbreaking, trainrobbery, cattle hosting kind) and addapting it to hip hop. The decisions were made because the music sold better and probably was more easily produced and required less talent.

While hip hop might have been a contributing factor I dont think it was the main one. White kids dont act out on their music either, with some rare exceptions.



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 02:55 PM
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this rap seems to be sending an ambiguous message:




posted on May, 5 2012 @ 03:01 PM
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If Nate Dogg is a Rapper/HipHopper.



Then So is Johnny Cash




posted on May, 5 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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sure sounds like rap, not necessarily Hip/Hop, to me.




posted on May, 5 2012 @ 03:37 PM
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from what I can hear, all American music is basically the same. any attempt to destroy someone should be considered not an attack upon just a generation or specific race but an unprovoked assault upon an entire nation and the people that had the meeting, if they exist, are guilty of Treason.

if you want to pick a bale of cotton in 1 day, you got to "jump down on it."




posted on May, 5 2012 @ 06:59 PM
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Been mulling this one over and on balance, while it sounds very plausible given the notorious cynicism (if not outright corruption) in the music business.....I'm not convinced.

Even if the music companies had invested in private prisons, why would they require artists and producers etc. to become directly involved in their scheme? They could quite easily achieve exactly the same results by selectively promoting only the rap music that met their needs (this is pretty much what they do anyway). Indeed inviting such people (especially black musicians or producers) into the conspiracy would surely only increase the chance of it being exposed.

Just a thought, all the best



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 07:43 AM
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I don't know how I feel about this. It does seem entirely possible though and I wouldn't be too surprised if it is true. It seems like the whole scheme would work without most in the industry having to know the true nature of it. Private prisons are a huge problem in this nation and with the US housing more prisoners than any other nation on the planet, it makes me wonder why. I'm a recovering drug addict myself and I didn't realize how much drugs are referenced in popular music until after I quit. It seems like most songs on the radio talk about drinking or drugs when there are so many other issues they could be focusing their music on. I guess I have to chalk it up to the fact that most Americans are still asleep and I wish artists would use their platform to inform the world about what's really going on. I'm guessing no one wants to hear it though. I'm so out of touch with new music that my boss makes fun of me when he makes a song reference and I have no idea what he's talking about. I like it that way though. There isn't any substance to a lot of popular music anymore. It's sad to see unknown artists struggle to use what little platform they have to send out a message, be it with their lyrics or just with their fans.

TL
R I wouldn't be surprised if this is real.





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