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Ask a Teacher Anything

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posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by SoulVoid
 


I But IMO in the end, we are simply cheating ourselves and the child out of the precious allotted time we have with them while they are young. Those years will never ever be recoverable. {Take that as the Gospel truth}



Let me tell you something, some things ressonate deep within our hearts, and what you said here is one of those things..
Thanks...




posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by cloudyday

Originally posted by smyleegrl
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Many rural areas do have classes with multiple grade levels. But the advantage of the home school kids, IMO, is not that the children are with others on different levels. After all, the average classroom has children working on a wide range of levels. The biggest advantage for home schooled kids is the individualized attention they receive. Say a parent is homeschooling three children. She can work directly with what each child needs, strengthen areas of weakness, provide basically one-on-one attention. EVERY child would thrive in that environment.

Now compare that to the typical classroom. 24 first graders, one teacher. Individualized attention? Rarely happens, simply because of the setup in the classroom.

With continued budget cuts, our class sizes are growing larger and larger. Even though studies show that reducing class size leads to better scores, the government keeps raising the size limit.


I'm sure somebody has already tried this, but here goes anyway: what about elementary school classrooms that consist of 3 or 4 students at each of the grade levels mixed together in each classroom? Then the older students can teach the younger students while the teacher stands by to support them? I think this is how the one room schools worked (at least on TV).
edit on 27-4-2012 by cloudyday because: (no reason given)

We do something similar, in a way.
In every classroom you have a wide range of ability levels. So you pair a struggling student with one who has mastered the skill. It does work to a certain extent.
But to answer your question, I'm not familiar with any schools that currently use this approach. Interesting question and I'll try to find out.



posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by Germanicus
 


My son does Charter School. He is a kindergartener with SPD and it has worked WONDERS. At the beginning of the year, I did not know how I was going to even make it work. Now he is on his last 7 weeks of school (packet period) and at the top of his class. He reads at a 4th grade level and absolutely loves going to school. I credit that to the fact he does 2 days in class, 3 at home. He does not feel overwhelmed, we get all the support we need, and learning is actually fun. The teacher at his school is very involved and the classes are small. The teachers have a little bit more liberty as well and we can say things like "Easter" instead of "Spring Holiday".


Before we got accepted to the Charter School, we toured our neighborhood public school, which boasts themselves as the best in our entire county (San Diego). I went in, preparing to be impressed, and walked away disgusted. The principal spent literally half of the orientation finger-wagging us, and actually threatened to send the local police after us if we dare to try and go to their school while not living in the zone. He also made it clear he would not tolerate absences in any way, and went on and on about school funding. Things went from bad to worse when we toured the kindergarten classrooms. The assigned teacher, an exhausted older woman, had stacks of papers that said 1993 on them. It looked like a dump, she did not even want to answer questions, and she yelled at a mother who dared to ask something she claims she already covered. It felt like a Twilight Zone.
I was so relieved when the Charter School called and offered us an opening.



posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by bastet11
 


Wow! Reading on a fourth grade level...seriously impressed!

Sounds like you dodged a potential bullet. I'm so glad it's working for you and your son.

You know you're doing something right when your child loves school.



posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


# 5 Supplementing my child's education is something I may want to do in a year or 2. Focusing in on what she wants to do with her life, working with horses, and cutting out certain subjects that aren't really applicable. When you get the time could you PM me a couple links of places that could get me on the right track?

I would like it if she could get some personalized curriculum solely online that could also help get her into some of the colleges that focus on equine careers.

I'm going to friend you and stalk you now if you don't mind.





posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 07:00 PM
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Originally posted by Taupin Desciple
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


# 5 Supplementing my child's education is something I may want to do in a year or 2. Focusing in on what she wants to do with her life, working with horses, and cutting out certain subjects that aren't really applicable. When you get the time could you PM me a couple links of places that could get me on the right track?

I would like it if she could get some personalized curriculum solely online that could also help get her into some of the colleges that focus on equine careers.

I'm going to friend you and stalk you now if you don't mind.




One can never have too many friends. Stalk away!

About your daughter.. what grade is she in? Home school, public, or private?
What careers capture her interest? A vet would need high scores in math and science. Running a horse farm? Focus on math and get lots of practical experience.

I'm sorry this isn't a very helpful answer, but all I know about horses is they are bigger than me. If you can give me more info, I'll be happy to look into it for you both.



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Well your topic said ask a teacher anything.

But what does it mean to be morally offensive?



posted on Apr, 29 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by someguy0083
 


Ahhhhhhh. Too cute.

Morally offensive is defined by the individual, typically based on societal norms.



posted on May, 11 2012 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by XLR8R
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


I don't mean any disrespect but how come the truth about historical facts isn't taught in school? I was taught to revere the colonists. But upon further research on my part, I had found out about the Native American genocide which they had never talked about when I was in school. When I brought up the issue I was told there was no such thing and was reprimanded for holding fast to the facts. And this is just one example out of many. Why such secrecy and hypocrisy? Can't the teachers take it upon themselves to teach outside the curiculum, or adding side notes to what is being taught?
edit on 26-4-2012 by XLR8R because: (no reason given)

Your location has a great deal to do with the way things are taught as well as the textbooks that are adopted and state and national standards. The example of the Native American genocide would depend on what part of the country you live in. If you're in the NorthEast, they like to glorify the colonists. In the midwest, they take the side of the Native Americans more. Not sure what they do on the West Coast, I've not lived out there.
A good example of what I'm talking about goes back to the Civil War. If you live in the North it's taught very differently from it is in the South. In the South, I have actually heard it referred to as "The War of Northern Agression" (and agree with that since I"m southern LOL).
The teachers do teach outside the curiculum, just not as much as they used to :/



posted on May, 11 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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History is told by the victors.

I just want to know why I am hit up for fundraisers EVERY OTHER WEEK! I only have so much funds and telling my kids, " No " all the time, in the name of supporting their school buying something I haven't any real use for.

Creative ideas, just let's be a bit more practical here, and go the box tops way, get with scott paper towels or toilet paper and then I can support my school easier. Better yet, send them things to our politicians.

edit on 11-5-2012 by Moneyisgodlifeisrented because: (no reason given)





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