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Spaceship photographed flying close to the sun

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posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 05:15 AM
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reply to post by Acidtastic
 


Except for the fact they look nothing like each other




posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by FlySolo
 


At any rate, this is only to explain away planets or stars which give off lots of light. This doesn't really explain artifacts.

You're correct.
This explains what is seen in the image in the OP.

Cosmic Rays: Cosmic rays are noise (white dots, blobs and streaks) created in the images by energetic particles striking the cameras in the telescopes. Cosmic rays get reported as comets more often than real comets do! So it essential to learn how to distinguish them from something that is real. Cosmic rays are completely random -- they can, and do, appear absolutely anywhere in the images and they only appear once. They are most commonly just dots, but they are also occasionally blobs or streaks. Some are very faint, but most are quite bright. Some even saturate the camera and cause the large horizontal spikes we often see on planets and bright stars.

sungrazer.nrl.navy.mil...



I would have to ask then. What methodology is used to rule out cosmic rays? If any streak or blob of light is immediately explained as a cosmic ray based upon what we already know, what remaining tools for analysis are left? You're an astronomy buff. Does the community have any subset of protocols to follow-up on as a contingency? I mean, a real object could be there and no one would even know it.
edit on 26-4-2012 by FlySolo because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by FlySolo
 


I would have to ask then. What methodology is used to rule out cosmic rays?


For starters:
Something appearing in more than one frame.
Something appearing in more than one instrument.


Cosmic rays are completely random -- they can, and do, appear absolutely anywhere in the images and they only appear once.

sungrazer.nrl.navy.mil...



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 01:37 PM
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i like to do these little gifs with various filters for 'anomalous' pics. they may or may not add anything to the final concensus, but it's a hobby, and they look neat. so, here is one i made of this cosmic ray/space rock/intergalactic starship.





edit on 26/4/12 by RoScoLaz because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 01:51 PM
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The crafty newsbuggers concentrated on the B/W picture as it appears to give the image some body by light and shade, where there is none. The Mail and AOL have been at it again.

I will allow though that a ship could get out of sight in 12 minutes

edit on 26-4-2012 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 07:20 AM
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if you look it comes in from the right of the sun, goes to the left and then shoots out on the top. Its very fast but you can see it. Probably just like what scientist say it is. Its intresting to say the least.



posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 07:26 AM
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I agree it was quick, but hey would you want to be near our sun for more then a second... I think not, and if they can get that close to our soon, i am sure their tech is very advanced to where they can do these things in a flash, to us may be a second, to them could be an hour, ECT.



posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 08:00 AM
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Originally posted by KingJod
I agree it was quick, but hey would you want to be near our sun for more then a second... I think not, and if they can get that close to our soon, i am sure their tech is very advanced to where they can do these things in a flash, to us may be a second, to them could be an hour, ECT.


It was so quick because it's in only one frame, the following frame was 12mins later. Had it been seen from another viewpoint/camera, then that would have been interesting.



posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by FlySolo
 


At any rate, this is only to explain away planets or stars which give off lots of light. This doesn't really explain artifacts.

You're correct.
This explains what is seen in the image in the OP.

Cosmic Rays: Cosmic rays are noise (white dots, blobs and streaks) created in the images by energetic particles striking the cameras in the telescopes. Cosmic rays get reported as comets more often than real comets do! So it essential to learn how to distinguish them from something that is real. Cosmic rays are completely random -- they can, and do, appear absolutely anywhere in the images and they only appear once. They are most commonly just dots, but they are also occasionally blobs or streaks. Some are very faint, but most are quite bright. Some even saturate the camera and cause the large horizontal spikes we often see on planets and bright stars.

sungrazer.nrl.navy.mil...



swamp gas...etc. Pixels, artifacts, cosmic rays...The most advanced spacecraft with the most advanced imaging tools in the solar system, and so many of these things. You would think with such technology, they would have accounted for "cosmic rays" and other material that would distract photos.



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