We Gotta Get out of This Place!

page: 2
106
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 06:39 AM
link   
Poetic prose meets history, with inline citations.

This is a thread worth reading if ever there was.




posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 06:55 AM
link   
Oh baby...oh bey bee...OBEY bee ..its a GOOD BUY
a couple rock n roll phrases from every other song...
ala "They Live"

snf



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 08:02 AM
link   
reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 

psst!...



got Metal? (...heavy metal)

myself I was born too late for the pacifist gene...



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 08:03 AM
link   


"Eve of Destruction" is a protest song written by P. F. Sloan in 1965. Several artists have recorded it, but the best-known recording was by Barry McGuire. This recording was made between July 12 and July 15, 1965 and released by Dunhill Records. The accompanying musicians were top-tier LA session players: P.F. Sloan on guitar, Hal Blaine (of Phil Spector's "Wrecking Crew") on drums, and Larry Knechtel on bass. The vocal track was thrown on as a rough mix and was not intended to be the final version, but a copy of the recording "leaked" out to a DJ, who began playing it.[1] The song was an instant hit and as a result the more polished vocal track that was at first envisioned was never recorded

Eve of Destruction

Protest songs had a big influence in the sixies and during the Viet Nam war, along comes the seventies and it all went away, in fact there have been no major protests since that time, are we so used to war that we don't care any longer, guess it's easier to listen to Rock n' Roll.



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 08:04 AM
link   
reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 


Merveilleux….très bien écrit!



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 08:19 AM
link   
our Fathers God to thee... Authors of Liberty... of Thee we Sing...


Heavy Metal!



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 08:51 AM
link   
reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 




I just had to.



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 09:02 AM
link   
reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 


Great great thread man. A quick point about blues though, if you will indulge me. I am somewhat inclined to believe that the structure of a blues song was around for a few hundred years before the music that is associated with it was born. It came from Africa though.
The Epic of Son Jara was an oral poem from West Africa and served as the creation story of the Mali empire, much like the Aeneid did for Rome.
What's unique and interesting is that the poem is structured as a call and response with several repeated lines in most verses, much like a blues song.

I have most of the poem in a book somewhere around here and google isn't yielding many results for texts. Just thought it would be interesting, if, off topic, to share with everyone.



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 09:27 AM
link   
S/F

After reading and having a nostalgic retroflection i had an epiphany to Google (how dose music reflect society)
wiki.answers.com...
Music reflects society on a much deeper level than merely effecting peoples moods, music mirrors the attitudes of its time. For example, the 1950's were a very optimistic almost fairy tale period, and the music typically reflected this by being equally light weight and frivolous, ie Pat Boone. It was not until the late 50's that we saw music with more substance. On the other hand, 1960's were a time of great social change, a much more serious decade, and the music also reflected that.


Compare that with the 2000's, and the materialistic & superficial times we live in. Marketing and hype is at levels previously unheard of, and again music reflects this change. Too often rags to riches has replaced the dues paying musician, as the preferred or expected route to success.

Technology has also had a major impact on music, on one hand, it has made it much easier and cheaper to produce (which is good), but it has also made it exponentially more disposable and "same" sounding. The "anyone" can do it mentality is not without consequence, as it has resulted in a flood of bad to decent songs, with the seldom great song more likely buried in the mix.
The best guitar players spent years honing their chops, and experimenting with different amps / guitars to achieve their unique sound (3-4 bars was all it took to recognize them), now that same sound is stored on a microchip, easily emulated with a push of a button.

Popularity and financially success is more and more used as the barometer to judge talent and artistic success. How well an "artist" can work the social media game will more impact their career, than how many hours spent honing their fretboard or vocal skills.

The art of writing a memorable song has taken a back seat to performance and image.

Yes, music very much reflects society, perhaps more than any other art form.

And for those who would like to reminisce, videos provided below.






posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 09:35 AM
link   
reply to post by Ghostcooler
 


"All this machinery making modern music can still be open-hearted"
I'm not a Rush fan, but these words are true. There is still an art to tone. Using amp emulations is a technique, of course, like any other technique, it can be poorly used and over used, but it doesn't have to be. The invention of electronic drums didn't destroy acoustic drums, it simply expanded them. Some players will choose to use emulations, while others will not.
The problem comes in when a sound engineer says "You're making a rock song? Ok, this is what everything MUST sound like." then that engineer punches in a few presets. It's not the tool that the problem comes from, it's the people wielding the tools and the culture surrounding them.

I understand the sentiment, I really do, and I agree with you that radio ready music today is complete crap (Listening to the Band's Last Waltz.). But the problem is something more complicated than amp sims.



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 09:55 AM
link   
reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 
Funny how we as humans can script movies and write lyrics to songs that semm to imply we know what we as a species are capable of but we can't seem to find a way to stop it, .....................for thousands of years now. Sounds a little sociopathic to me, I mean can all the people running this clown fest be................sociopaths??NAWWWWW

My belief is my signature and always will be, realizem is a scarry thing.
edit on 24-4-2012 by Battleline because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 09:56 AM
link   
very nice thread
as this was my life experience touched my being to the core
also reminded me of my song of the time

1-2-3 What are we fighting for? Don't ask me, I don't give a damn. The next stop is Vietnam . 5-6-7 Open up the pearly gates. It ain't no time to wonder why. Yippee! We're all going to die.

-- Country Joe and the Fish
the anthem of my generation
s & f



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 09:59 AM
link   
edit on 4/24/2012 by lonegurkha because: (no reason given)


This is a song I remember form the 60s and 70s. Seems things haven't changed much.

I think that your thread is very well done and points out that after the assination of JFK we've gone steadily down hill.

Constant increases in our debts. continual wars and the corporate seizure of powers. As well as the congresses lack of representation of "We the People". Executive orders that bypass congressional approval, and seize more power for the executive branch. Along with all the other problems that have come to be in the intervening years, serve to underline the Ball of Confusion we see today.

Thanks for posting this. Perhaps some folks who read this will be awakened to what is really going on . S&F
edit on 4/24/2012 by lonegurkha because: (no reason given)
edit on 4/24/2012 by lonegurkha because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 10:07 AM
link   
Simply, terrifyingly, audaciously, wonderful. Stark and to the bone. Well written and a complete mastery of the nomenclature all the way through the piece.



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 10:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by Aquarius1
Protest songs had a big influence in the sixies and during the Viet Nam war, along comes the seventies and it all went away, in fact there have been no major protests since that time, are we so used to war that we don't care any longer, guess it's easier to listen to Rock n' Roll.


Ain't that the truth. Nowadays we hear some mild anti-war stuff but, for the most part, the songs that get the real airplay are the ones that are hard-core Pro-USA garbage.

I like country music and listen to it a lot when driving but, when some of that flag waving garbage comes on, I just have to switch the station because this stuff makes me want to throw up.




When are people gonna learn that the best way to "support our troops" (
) is to demand that we bring them home, away from the danger of occupying a country that doesn't want our troops there and never asked for our help in the first place.



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 10:21 AM
link   


There's a black man with a black cat
Livin' in a black neighborhood
He's got an interstate runnin' through his front yard
You know he thinks that he's got it so good

And there's a woman in the kitchen
Cleanin' up evenin' slop
And he looks at her and says, "Hey darlin'
I can remember when you could stop a clock"

Oh, but ain't that America for you and me
Ain't that America somethin' to see baby
Ain't that America home of the free, yeah
Little pink houses for you and me
Oh yeah for you and me, oh

Well there's a young man in a T-shirt
Listenin' to a rock 'n' rollin' station
He's got a greasy hair, greasy smile
He says, "Lord this must be my destination"

'Cause they told me when I was younger
Said, "Boy you're gonna be President"
But just like everything else those old crazy dreams
Just kinda came and went

Chorus

Well there's people and more people
What do they know, know, know?
Go to work in some high rise
And vacation down at the Gulf of Mexico, ooo yeah

And there's winners and there's losers
But they ain't no big deal
'Cause the simple man baby pays the thrills
The bills, the pills that kill

Oh, but ain't that America for you and me
Ain't that America somethin' to see baby
Ain't that America home of the free, yeah
Little pink houses for you and me, ooo
Ooo yeah






posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 10:23 AM
link   

Originally posted by Ghostcooler
S/F

After reading and having a nostalgic retroflection i had an epiphany to Google (how dose music reflect society


I myself think music reflects dearly about society and even the individual... it is a form of expression and alot of music with lyrics have statements (pretty much every song that has lyrical content)

for instance the hippy generation were cool and all but they missed one crucial point... there would have been no party for them to even attend out to pasture holding flowers because the world is a dangerous place


we have learned so much since then and we are no longer xenophobes... somebody's gotta tend to the forest for others to be able to frolic thru it.

we love peace and love too don't get me wrong man but we also have somewhat of an education in our National History... We are the World (those ones who make a brighter day)





posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 10:34 AM
link   
reply to post by FortAnthem
 

I hit you with a star for your song, I took it up into my veins!

...but not necessarily your statement,

(see my Pro Patriot statements above)

go ye frolic now



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 10:50 AM
link   
reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 


Truely a masterful job. I enjoyed the hell out of that Jean.



Sooner or later we all get out of this place by whatever vehicle chooses us first. No one gets out of here alive.

SnF
edit on 24-4-2012 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 11:06 AM
link   
reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 


Always loved that original (by the animals) oh, one thing Tom and Jerry cartoons were MGM 'shorts' made between 1940 and 1957, by the 60's they were gone, maybe that is what you meant. Good post!
Gawd, I remember the "Summer of Love" like it was yesterday!





new topics
top topics
 
106
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join