It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Why are the parables about "the kingdom of heaven" being ignored???

page: 2
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 09:55 AM
link   
reply to post by sk0rpi0n
 

Nothing about jews in here. But rather, it applies to all humanity and is very eschatological in nature... involving the "end of the age" and judgement.

I think the fact that they were parables has to do with the idea that Jesus could not openly go around denouncing the Jews and prophesying their ruin, so you would not expect it to say "Jews" in there. Another reason being that in John, The Jews, meant the Sadducees.
The Wheat and Tares parable could be explaining why God did not immediately destroy Jerusalem as punishment for crucifying Jesus, but waited another thirty five years or whatever.




posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 09:58 AM
link   
reply to post by sk0rpi0n
 

I dont trust Paul... but I know that even Paul never taught some of the bizarre things that modern christians are saying these days...like Jesus being God himself and such.

Where did that come from? Definitely cant be from Paul or anybody else in the bible
Being the Son of God automatically makes you a god. The Gospels say that was the understanding of the Jews at the time. Also Paul in Philippians 2 says Jesus was in the form of God.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 10:02 AM
link   
reply to post by sk0rpi0n
 

I don't trust Paul...

There would be no Christianity without Paul.
There would have been just a sect of Jews which eventually got reabsorbed into the mainstream.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 10:09 AM
link   
reply to post by jmdewey60
 


Address a fellow brother with Love. Embrace his holes in understanding by a light loving wisdom which is how Christ would have explained. Your cold words do not explain the truth, they beat and maim faith by placing the word "false" on someone else's belief. Inspire faith and be inspired!



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 10:25 AM
link   
Some of the biblical parables, in my opinion, were not given by Jesus, but were introduced by politicians and bankers. Example:


’ 24 Then the one who had received the one talent came and said, ‘Sir, I knew that you were a hard man, harvesting where you did not sow, and gathering where you did not scatter seed, 25 so I was afraid, and I went and hid your talent in the ground. See, you have what is yours.’ 26 But his master answered, ‘Evil and lazy slave! So you knew that I harvest where I didn’t sow and gather where I didn’t scatter? 27 Then you should have deposited my money with the bankers, and on my return I would have received my money back with interest!




Banking! Interest? That's usary and strictly forbidden under Rabbinic Law.


Usury is the payment of interest on a loan by [a] borrower to [a] lender. The two biblical passages which forbid the taking of interest are:

“If you lend money to any of My people, even to the poor with thee, thou shalt not be to him as a creditor; neither shalt thou lay upon him interest” (Exodus 22:24).

“Thou shalt not lend upon interest to thy brother: interest of money, interest of victuals, interest of anything that is lent upon interest. Unto a foreigner thou mayest lend upon interest; but unto thy brother thou shalt not lend upon interest; that the Lord thy God may bless thee in all that thou puttest thy hand into, in the land whither thou goest in to possess it” (Deuteronomy 23:20-21). mobile.myjewishlearning.com...


And of course, there is Matthew's love of gnashing of teeth, again:


Therefore take the talent from him and give it to the one who has ten. 29 For the one who has will be given more, and he will have more than enough. But the one who does not have, even what he has will be taken from him. 30 And throw that worthless slave into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth’” (Matthew 25:13-30).t


If Jesus really said that, I'll eat my socks!

Just for fun, I have to add this for some light hearted fun this Sunday morning.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 01:16 PM
link   
Do you spend a lot of time sitting in the pews of Christian churches listening to the sermons?
If you did, you would certainly find the parables being preached about.
If you don't- how would you know that the parables are being ignored? Where do you get that from?



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 01:24 PM
link   
reply to post by DISRAELI
 


He finds them being ignored because there are not more followers of God. These parables sift out the true followers and teach wisdom of the Spirit. Yet we must draw conclusions to the with our own spirits and not by some formula. Where I go to church the parables are told and explained in simplicity, and they are just like bland stories which are overlooked. But the Kingdom of God is sought out by those who understand these parables. Their meaning is increased as wisdom and love is increased. Therefore their meanings are to be found and understood by each and every person, according to the grace granted to them by God. Why else would people hear and not understand? Because God grants True understanding and wisdom, He not only makes it, but teaches it, only to those who are willing to understand.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 08:13 PM
link   
reply to post by mikesk8s247
 

Address a fellow brother with Love. Embrace his holes in understanding by a light loving wisdom which is how Christ would have explained. Your cold words do not explain the truth, they beat and maim faith by placing the word "false" on someone else's belief. Inspire faith and be inspired!
I don't think there is a shortage of willingness to have faith in something, around here. To me, the problem is that there are lots of wrong "Faiths" that are vying for attention to have people latch onto, where if one is not careful, it is misplaced trust in something that seems exciting and new, like what Paul warned of, that makes the ears tingle.



posted on Apr, 23 2012 @ 03:13 AM
link   
reply to post by jmdewey60
 



The Wheat and Tares parable could be explaining why God did not immediately destroy Jerusalem as punishment for crucifying Jesus, but waited another thirty five years or whatever.


Jesus explanation of the parable of the weeds shows that it refers to the "end of the age"...where the righteous being rewarded in the kingdom of Heaven... and the sinners are punished. It was pretty much explaining judgement day.

and not just the destruction of Jerusalem.

edit on 23-4-2012 by sk0rpi0n because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2012 @ 06:06 AM
link   
reply to post by sk0rpi0n
 

. . . it refers to the "end of the age"..

That was the end of the age.

Probably what you are thinking of is the Last Day. That is a hypothetical ultimate judgment day which happens so far off into the future that, in practical terms, it is never. Jesus pretty much blows off that theory.

Jesus was concerned, in the Gospels, with the end of the Age where there was a centralized temple sacrificial system, in favor of a spiritual age which Jesus introduced.



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 12:38 PM
link   
I found a post from someone who seems to agree with me to some degree on this idea of the parables being addressed to the Jews who rejected Jesus, and not to us in particular.
This comes from a site called MidActsDispensationalist. Posted by Deborah L. Collins.

The idea of "the children of the kingdom" being cast into outer darkness," and the "weeping and gnashing of teeth" concept is found exclusively in Scriptures addressed to (Matt. 15:24) and concerning ONLY the nation of Israel during Christ's specific ministry to her. God did not address the Gentiles directly until he set Israel's kingdom promises aside and raised up a new apostle, Paul, to "bear my name before the Gentiles, and kings, and the children of Israel." (Acts 9:15). During Israel's program in time past and in the ages to come (tribulation, millennium), Gentiles were to find salvation through Israel's witness but never directly. In the "but now" (Eph. 2:13), the age of Gentile grace (Eph. 3:1, 2), God's unique gospel of grace according to the revelation of the mystery committed to Paul, is made known through the inspired writings of our apostle in Romans through Philemon.
blogspot







 
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join