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Do You Perceive People with (Foreign) Accents Differently?

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posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 04:37 PM
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Hello ATS,

There are members from all over the world on these forums, and it's definitely interesting to see how you deal with all sorts of accent we encounter around the world. Do accents matter to you, do you've your personal prejudicies, or - perhaps - you prefer people with native English accents? Just a thought




posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 04:40 PM
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I get weak-kneed when I hear an Irish brogue, a Scots burr, or an Aussie drawl. It's instinctive, I think.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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I know I do. When I hear an accent, I hope that I can understand them. I work in a call center so sometimes it can be a pain in the... you know what to understand.

Other than that, I see people as people. We all basically want to be treated respectfully and I try (and it can be really hard sometimes
especially when they are mad about something and your just trying to find out what it is so you can fix it)



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by survivaloftheslickest
 


I always feel stupid talking with people with thick accents. I have mild hearing loss in one ear, and accents make it much more difficult to for me to understand what is being said.
Otherwise, I do not care about accents.
One of my best college professors was from China. Hard at times for me to understand him. But the man was a brilliant lecturer and educator.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 04:50 PM
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Of course I perceive them differently. The very notion of an accent implies an entire different background, experience, and culture.

I recognize the difference, and it only goes to reaffirm that there are strong differences between individuals, and for me, it helps me strengthen my empathy towards others. It also goes to strengthen my identifying diversity amongst the worlds population, then goes to dissolve any idea of generalizing statements, it helps me remove the labels that I once placed on people. It may seem contradictory to some, but for me, knowing that everyone is different, and that there is such diversity that is derivative of experiences... I find it impossible to apply negative generalizing attributes to an individual, because actually mean this, would imply that I know EVERYTHING about an individual. Which I don't, and don't need to... for it is too monotonous of a task. It's easy enough to recognize and place one label on an individual... that is human. Recognizing accents daily, only strengthens that very notion.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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Because I am a first generation American, I grew up hearing accents (German and Spanish). I remember my friends coming over and freaking out when they heard my parents speak, saying "Your parents talk funny".

To me, it is comforting to hear English spoken with an accent other than American. I find it relaxing, but I'm aware that it is my upbringing that makes me feel this way.

Smyleegrl, you are so right. A man with an English, Scottish, Irish or Aussie accent is HOT. My 19 year old daughter almost faints when she sees that fast food commercial for smoothies with David Beckham. Those advertising people know what they're doing when they want to sell something to women in America.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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I love almost all accents. I like the sound of Russian accents, most European accents, South American type accents, etc.

I once gave to a charity mostly because the girl at the door had an Australian accent



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Smyleegrl, you are so right. A man with an English, Scottish, Irish or Aussie accent is HOT. My 19 year old daughter almost faints when she sees that fast food commercial for smoothies with David Beckham. Those advertising people know what they're doing when they want to sell something to women in America.


I think I swooned during Braveheart. Burrs and kilts, oh my!



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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I do, but perhaps not in the sense most might think.

As soon as I hear an accent that is not local, I firstly try to identify the origin, and if I cannot, I ask.

The main reason for this is to be delicate about ideas/customs, that might be the 'norm' where they are from, but not where they are visiting.

For example: if an Indian came to me, I wouldn't start talking about all the great steakhouses in the area. This is a small example, but I think it highlights what I mean when I say I treat people with accents differently. I do not have a negative association with accents that are not my own, I just want them to feel at home and welcome when they are traveling, and if I can make them feel at home by being delicate to their natural environment, why not?
edit on 20-4-2012 by Daemonicon because: Spelling



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
I love almost all accents. I like the sound of Russian accents, most European accents, South American type accents, etc.

I once gave to a charity mostly because the girl at the door had an Australian accent




An Irish lass got me! hahaha




posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by survivaloftheslickest
 


This is how the English Language should be spoken:-

www.youtube.com...



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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If you wish to learn how the English Language should be spoken check out Prof Stanley Unwins talk on Stereophony

www.youtube.com...




posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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It doesn't bother me but I do find I ask them to repeat themselves more so than people with a local accent, and it makes me feel bad because I don't like to repeat myself so I don't like to make others do it. I'm the first in my family born in America so I understand German accents easily. I do have a Cajun friend I have a hard time understanding. I just find myself nodding and smiling when he gets excited talking about something.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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Yeah, my wife is Korean and after 6 yrs of marriage, I still don't understand her...

Wait, that's different altogether.


Nope, I don't perceive people with foreign accents differently, is my answer to the question. Although I do make fun of my wife sometimes. Does that count?


Peace





edit on 20-4-2012 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 07:41 PM
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Not in a negative light but in a curious one. Sometimes I even pick up on the accent for a while when speaking. Various family growing up I was around;for example, a slight Irish accent even to languages German and Russian being spoken. While I was young can still tell the differences easy when hearing those accents and languages.



posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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Originally posted by alldaylong
reply to post by survivaloftheslickest
 


This is how the English Language should be spoken:-

www.youtube.com...


No, THIS is how it should be spoken!





posted on May, 8 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by MESSAGEFROMTHESTARS
 


Please don't take this the wrong way - it is in genuine curiosity that I ask this:

Are you by any chance a non-native English speaker? Your use of commas, for example, seems ever so slightly off, but I could definitely be wrong. Perhaps from Switzerland or somewhere similar?

I only ask as if you're not a native , your command of English is exceptional, and I'd like to know what background in learning the language you do have. If you are a native English speaker, please don't take offence - I mean none.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by survivaloftheslickest
 


I don't treat anyone differently for their accents. In 6th and 7th grade, I was overseas, and went to an International School with kids from over 300 different countries, so I got used to it.

I'm still a bit of a sucker for a good British or Aussie accent though (on women). Doesn't even matter if it's trashy Brit or classy Brit. It's all good.

Many Europeans are required to learn English in school, as it's an international language of business...(for an above poster).
edit on 8-5-2012 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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To the people commenting about Scottish accents...

A Scotsman here! Born and bred in Glasgow


I love accents, they make the world such a diverse and interesting place.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by SaltireWarrior
To the people commenting about Scottish accents...

A Scotsman here! Born and bred in Glasgow


I love accents, they make the world such a diverse and interesting place.


Borrrrrrn and brrrrrred in Glasgow.......

Oh dear lord. My ultimate weakness.



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